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Benchmarking Higher Ed AV Staffing Levels — Revisited

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-10-21 17:26

By Mike Tomei, Campus Technology
Have you ever met an AV support department whose members feel like they’re well-staffed, are 100 percent caught up on all projects, are easily able to satisfy the support demands of the campus community, and have plenty of free time to plan for future classroom installs? No? Me neither. AV support folks are always stretched thin and pulled in many different directions. With classroom AV technology in its heyday — active learning classrooms, VR/AR and collaborative technology pushing us way past standard “hang and bang” classroom projects — the increased level of classroom AV design and installation coordination inevitably results in backend staffing and support burdens.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/10/15/benchmarking-higher-ed-av-staffing-levels-revisited.aspx

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Making Online Ed Personal

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-10-21 17:20

Carolyn Gentle-Genitty, Tomorrow’s Professor

Since students who choose online learning often have multiple other commitments, Gentle-Genitty makes very clear how much time students can expect to invest preparing for class, listening to lectures, doing homework, and taking part in chat rooms. “Very specific information gives students a realistic picture of the commitment they’re making,” says Gentle-Genitty. “I want them to understand that a three-credit course may translate into more than nine hours of work per week. If they know exactly when, on what weekday, we discuss their papers, they can become very efficient at structuring their own time. Structure is liberating.” Her course framework enables students to be organized and connected. It comprises a teaching presence, a cognitive space where students interact with content, and a social presence—online discussion forums and chat rooms—where she and her students interact, build personal connections, form teams, and work in small groups.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1672

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Google 2.0: Why MIT scientists are building a new search engine

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-10-21 17:15

by Peter Hopkins, Big Think

W. Daniel Hillis is an inventor, engineer and author, Professor at the MIT Media Lab and Judge Widney Professor of Engineering and Medicine at the University of Southern California. Decentralizing knowledge and making information provenance transparent will be a revolution in the so-called “post-truth age”. The Underlay, a revolutionary knowledge graph, is being developed at MIT by Danny Hillis, SJ Klein, Travis Rich. “So the idea is that what we really need to do is we need to separate up two things. We need to separate the record of what different people said and who said it—the provenance of what was said—And then separately have in some sense a network of trust which is going to be different for different purposes…. A fact is a fact. It’s not copyrightable, to own truth.”

https://bigthink.com/videos/google-2-0-why-mit-scientists-are-building-a-new-search-engine

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Credentialing Evolves as Demand Grows for Middle-Skills Jobs

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-10-21 17:10

By Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed
The bachelor’s degree remains by far the best ticket to a well-paying job, according to new research from the Georgetown University Center on Education and the Workforce, which defines “good jobs” as ones that pay at least $35,000 — and an average of $56,000 for workers with less than a bachelor’s degree. But the report found that all of the growth of new good jobs in the non-bachelor’s-degree economy has been in so-called middle-skills jobs, especially those that require an associate degree. And workers are earning a growing array of credentials to help meet that demand.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/10/17/credentialing-evolves-demand-grows-middle-skills-jobs

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Google Brings Computing Courses to 10 Colleges

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-10-21 17:05

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed
Google announced its latest higher education foray Wednesday: technology courses developed in-house and delivered to students at 10 four-year institutions. Students at eight institutions can enroll this semester in two introductory courses on computer science and data science. The company developed the curriculum and provides the content and materials; institutions supply faculty members to lead in-class projects. Google is also accepting applications for additional institutions that want to offer the introductory computer science and data science courses. Priority consideration will go to institutions with no existing computer science program or one that’s at capacity.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/10/18/google-brings-computing-courses-10-colleges

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From Anxious Online Dean to Confident Virtual Instructor

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-10-21 17:03

By Robert Ubell, Inside Higher Ed

Robert Ubell spent years encouraging professors to overcome their fears, try something new and teach on the web. Now he’s trying to practice what he preached. For years, I’ve led hundreds of professors to the virtual well, gratified that they’ve been responsible for instructing about 30,000 online learners, but I never got close to teaching on screen. I’ve been an online general who sent his virtual troops into battle but, shamefully, never fought in the digital trenches myself. Feeling like a fraud all these years, it was time to step up to the challenge.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/views/2018/10/17/online-dean-describes-how-he-gained-confidence-teach-virtually

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Workplace Learning Is Central To Closing Skills Gap

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-10-20 17:25

ADELIA CELLINI LINECKER, Investor’s Business Daily

Offering programs is not enough. A recent LinkedIn survey found that the No. 1 challenge facing talent development in 2018 is getting workers to make time for learning. “Yet, 94% of employees say that they would stay at a company longer if it invested in their career development,” the study stated. “The modern organization needs to meet learners where they already are — aligning development opportunities with employee aspirations, and engaging them through the platforms where they are already spending their time.”

https://www.investors.com/news/management/leaders-and-success/workplace-learning-close-skills-gap/

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New 2-Year Online College Aims to Grow Quickly (But Without Traditional Gen-Ed Courses)

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-10-20 17:20

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge
Alternative higher education programs don’t always work out. But one former Harvard University dean is giving it a try. That former Harvard dean, Stephen Kosslyn, opened an online two-year college this week with an experimental academic program promising something between a vocational education and a traditional general-education curriculum. Among its innovations: no homework. It’s called Foundry College, and it is a for-profit college that plans to seek regional accreditation so that its students can eventually qualify for financial aid. Its leaders hope to partner with employers and convince them to cover some of the tuition costs for students.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-11-new-two-year-online-college-aims-to-grow-quickly-but-without-traditional-gen-ed-courses

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Online course can help boost business savvy

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-10-20 17:15

Sandy Nelson, Las Cruces Sun

Not everyone has the resources to go to college for an MBA, but anyone with an internet connection and some self-discipline can learn business basics through the DreamBuilder program offered by the nonprofit small-business development and training organization WESST. DreamBuilder targets women who want to start their own businesses or need additional support to increase profitability. It’s one of a growing number of massive open online courses (MOOCs) that offer busy people a way to explore subjects that interest them — and often to earn credit for their efforts.

https://www.lcsun-news.com/story/money/business/2018/10/12/online-course-can-help-boost-business-savvy/1574044002/

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MIT Announces Plan for $1B Effort on Computing, AI

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-10-20 17:05

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed
Massachusetts Institute of Technology on Monday morning announced a $1 billion plan to create a new college of computing within MIT, and to promote teaching and research on computing and artificial intelligence. MIT’s announcement says the effort “marks the single largest investment in computing and AI by an American academic institution, and will help position the United States to lead the world in preparing for the rapid evolution of computing and AI.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/10/16/mit-announces-plan-1b-effort-computing-ai

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New warnings about California students juggling college and jobs

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-10-20 17:04

by Larry Gordon, EdSource

Now, student job schedules are receiving more scrutiny from educators who are increasingly worried that working more than 15 or 20 hours a week can harm students’ grades and academic progress. That is an important issue in California where the state’s public universities are trying to push more students to finish their bachelor’s degrees in four years rather than five or six. For example, across the California State University system, the most current four-year graduation rate among students who entered as full-time freshman averaged 23 percent last year; 59 percent finished within six years.

New warnings about California students juggling college and jobs

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AI Team at Penn State Gains $30k to Define Fastest Path to Graduation

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-10-20 17:02

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
A mixed team of seven Penn State undergraduates — one in the College of Arts and Architecture and six from the College of Engineering — received $30,000 to continue development of an application to help students figure out the shortest path to graduation. “LionPlanner” won first place in a competition that challenged students to use artificial intelligence to solve real problems. The multi-phase contest was put on by the Nittany AI Alliance, a group of faculty and companies working together to give students opportunities to learn more about AI.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/10/15/ai-team-at-penn-state-gains-30k-to-define-fastest-path-to-graduation.aspx

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Walmart grants $4M to support workforce education

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-10-19 17:25

By Corinne Ruff, Retail Dive
Walmart and the Walmart Foundation are giving $4 million in grants to three organizations working to increase workforce training, according to a company press release. Walmart is also expanding its education benefit, announced in May, to U.S. e-commerce associates. The funding, announced Wednesday, is part of the company’s five-year Retail Opportunity Initiative, which is a $100 million effort to improve training programs in retail and adjacent sectors. Walmart and the Walmart Foundation have so far funded more than $80 million in related grants. The funding is broken up in the following ways: $2.4 million will go to the Foundation for California Community Colleges to launch an online community college to serve adult learners; $1 million to edX will help launch a series of courses in new “MicroBachelors” programs; and $250,000 will help Code for America “explore the role government technology systems can play in improving access to quality jobs in the digital age, and identify opportunities where technology can improve outcomes for job seekers.”

https://www.retaildive.com/news/walmart-grants-4m-to-support-workforce-education/539446/

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Report Pegs Cost to Develop an OER Course at $11,700

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-10-19 17:24

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
According to a recent research project, developing an open education resources course costs, on average, about $11,700, to cover salary and benefits for the instructors involved. OER courses produced by individuals were half the price of those created by teams ($8,900 vs. $18,200). As the report covering the data noted, teams provided both benefits — greater confidence in course quality and faster time to course completion — and hurdles: They also took more time to coordinate the work, sift through team materials, review and comment, and work toward consensus. Those are a few of the results that came out of an extensive study examining the implementation of OER in colleges.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/10/12/report-pegs-cost-to-develop-an-oer-course-at-11700.aspx

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Report: Students Prefer Courses that Use Open Educational Resources

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-10-19 17:15

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
Students like courses that use open education resources over their typical classes. In a recent research project, most (61 percent) reported that they experienced a boost in their learning experience; 59 percent said the quality of the instructional materials was better; 57 percent considered the caliber of teaching higher; and 54 percent claimed a stronger level of engagement. OER also made classes more affordable. Those results come from a study examining the implementation of OER in colleges. The work was commissioned by Achieving the Dream, a national nonprofit that works with a network of community colleges to help students succeed.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/10/12/report-students-prefer-courses-that-use-open-educational-resources.aspx

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Making Online Ed Personal

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-10-19 17:10

Carolyn Gentle-Genitty, Tomorrow’s Professor

Since students who choose online learning often have multiple other commitments, Gentle-Genitty makes very clear how much time students can expect to invest preparing for class, listening to lectures, doing homework, and taking part in chat rooms. “Very specific information gives students a realistic picture of the commitment they’re making,” says Gentle-Genitty. “I want them to understand that a three-credit course may translate into more than nine hours of work per week. If they know exactly when, on what weekday, we discuss their papers, they can become very efficient at structuring their own time. Structure is liberating.” Her course framework enables students to be organized and connected. It comprises a teaching presence, a cognitive space where students interact with content, and a social presence—online discussion forums and chat rooms—where she and her students interact, build personal connections, form teams, and work in small groups.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1672

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The Department of Education’s Plans for Overhauling Accrediting and Innovation Regulations

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-10-19 17:05

by Cheryl Dowd and Russ Poulin, WCET Frontiers

On Friday, October 13, the U.S. Department of Education published the unofficial version of its plan to establish an “Accreditation and Innovation” negotiated rule making committee. The final version should be published in the Federal Register today and includes the call for nominations to serve on the committee and three subcommittees. Quite simply, these discussions may result in the most sweeping set of changes witnessed in higher education in the United States since the middle of the last century. For WCET members and Frontiers readers, the issues highlighted for consideration are the very ones that will have a deep impact on our day-today operations.

The Department of Education’s Plans for Overhauling Accrediting and Innovation Regulations

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Google 2.0: Why MIT scientists are building a new search engine

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-10-19 17:02

by Peter Hopkins, Big Think

W. Daniel Hillis is an inventor, engineer and author, Professor at the MIT Media Lab and Judge Widney Professor of Engineering and Medicine at the University of Southern California. Decentralizing knowledge and making information provenance transparent will be a revolution in the so-called “post-truth age”. The Underlay, a revolutionary knowledge graph, is being developed at MIT by Danny Hillis, SJ Klein, Travis Rich. “So the idea is that what we really need to do is we need to separate up two things. We need to separate the record of what different people said and who said it—the provenance of what was said—And then separately have in some sense a network of trust which is going to be different for different purposes…. A fact is a fact. It’s not copyrightable, to own truth.”

https://bigthink.com/videos/google-2-0-why-mit-scientists-are-building-a-new-search-engine

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What’s the blueprint for a 21st-century college campus?

News & Thoughts - Thu, 2018-10-18 17:25

by James Paterson, Education Dive
With enrollments declining and technology advancing, colleges are breaking ground on spaces that give students and faculty new ways to engage. Facing headwinds that are muddling their missions and their budgets and luring away prospective students, college and university officials are adapting their campuses in big and small ways that they hope will help them navigate it all. From soaring, high-tech innovation labs that attract new students, to small-scale huddle spaces and digital campsites that foster the soft skills bosses increasingly want, colleges are building anew or repurposing existing infrastructure to meet the learning needs of today’s college students. And flexibility is key.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/whats-the-blueprint-for-a-21st-century-college-campus/539281/

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How campuses can play better defense against expanding cyberthreats

News & Thoughts - Thu, 2018-10-18 17:19

Russell Schrader, Education Dive

Russell Schrader, executive director of the nonprofit National Cyber Security Alliance, shares ways institutions can keep information, and the means of exchanging it, secure: “The biggest challenge is knowing what you have and who is accessing it — data integrity. The idea is that when you put data in, it stays exactly the same while you’re storing it, you know who’s taking it out, and it’s exactly the same way it was before [when they’re done]. It’s not just about access to data and dissemination of data, it’s what’s happening to that data at rest. A lot of colleges don’t have up-to-date, sophisticated data-management systems and hardware and software to do that, so they’re prone to attacks not only to exfiltrate data but also to change data. It’s certainly not unknown for institutions that pride themselves on having open and accessible systems to also pride themselves on educating an incredibly sophisticated group of students who are well-versed in cybersecurity and in coding.”

https://www.educationdive.com/news/how-campuses-can-play-better-defense-against-expanding-cyberthreats/539427/

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