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Engineering Education
Updated: 19 hours 11 min ago

More North Dakota students will get the opportunity to receive college credit

Mon, 2018-09-03 17:25

By: Nathalie Gomez, My ND Now

Students have the chance to take Advanced placement courses in Calculus, Biology, Statistics, and English– and even though they’re online courses— they still get hands on help. “We never feel like we don’t have enough help or support, We’ve already been like emailing her and we can text her we have her phone number and we’re setting up Skype calls,” said Sutter. If the program is successful NMSI hopes to expand the readiness program to other states and give other students the same opportunities.

https://www.myndnow.com/news/minot-news/more-north-dakota-students-will-get-the-opportunity-to-receive-college-credit/1393600284

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Chris Caplice and Justin Reich win 2018 MITx Prize for Teaching and Learning in MOOCs

Mon, 2018-09-03 17:20

by MIT Open Learning

Chris Caplice, executive director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics, received the award for his work on the MicroMasters Program in Supply Chain Management. MIT launched the MicroMasters credential in fall of 2015. Since then, more than than 25 universities have also launched MicroMasters programs through edX. The MicroMasters Program in Supply Chain Management includes five courses of 13 weeks each, plus a final comprehensive exam. Justin Reich, executive director of the MIT Teaching Systems Lab, was selected for his work on 11.154x (Launching Innovation in Schools), a six-week course targeted to school leaders including teachers, principals, superintendents, school board members, and others.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-chris-caplice-justin-reich-win-mitx-prize-for-moocs-0824

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Up to 1 in 5 Washington students live far away from college

Mon, 2018-09-03 17:16

by Katherine Long, Seattle Times

According to an analysis by The Chronicle of Higher Education, Washington is one of 11 states where 10.1 to 20 percent of the population lives in an “education desert,” where it’s at least a 60-minute drive to get to a college campus. The distance from college is key, the Chronicle notes, because most students stay close to home to earn a degree. In 2016, almost 40 percent of first-time, full-time freshmen said their colleges were less than 50 miles from their homes, according a national study of college freshmen. In Washington, rural superintendents are working to try to get more kids to be better prepared for college or some type of degree after high school, said John Glenewinkel, the superintendent of both the Curlew and Republic school districts in Ferry County, one of the state’s northeastern counties.

https://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/education-deserts-in-our-state-up-to-1-in-5-washington-students-live-far-away-from-college/

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These 4 areas are critical to higher ed’s technological transformation

Mon, 2018-09-03 17:10

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News
Higher-ed leaders must prepare their campuses for augment reality, artificial intelIigence, and more…. Higher ed is in the middle of a critical–yet often invisible–technological transformation, according to a new report from the Center for Digital Education (CDE). Technologies such as augmented reality and artificial intelligence are hyped daily for their future impact, but higher-ed leaders must first prepare their campuses for these `technological revolutions.  A CDE survey finds that college and university leaders are focusing on transforming academics, securing students and data, improving student services, and modernizing IT. These four core areas, they believe, will establish a solid foundation to support future innovation on campus.

 

These 4 areas are critical to higher ed’s technological transformation

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Student income-share agreements are making a comeback, but are they a smart bet?

Mon, 2018-09-03 17:05

BY DEREK HANDOVA, eCampus News
Income-share agreements (ISAs), in which students pay reduced tuition up front for a portion of their salary after graduation, are part of the new strategy to expand access, increase affordability, and reduce the risk students run in paying for college, according to Vemo Education, a company that handles income-based student-financing solutions. And a growing number of colleges and universities have recently implemented ISAs as a new, student-centric model that aligns costs with outcomes. Unlike student loans, ISAs have a fixed number of payments. This may result in a student paying less or more than the total tuition reduction they received during enrollment, but the income-share agreement is always capped at an amount that will not exceed some multiplier (e.g., 1x, 2x, 2.5x). ISAs let universities show that they stand behind their “product” by taking on part of the risk to finance it. However, if a student doesn’t make a minimum income, no repayments are required. On the other hand, if the student exceeds income expectations, the university receives a bonus on its investment—up to a point.

Income-share agreements are making a comeback, but are they a smart bet?

 

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Why it’s difficult to track how many adults are in college

Mon, 2018-09-03 17:03

by James Paterson, Education Dive
Experts have differing views about whether the number of adult learners is growing, but a group representing non-traditional students says that regardless of the trend, institutions should be doing more to target this group specifically, according to The Hechinger Report. Data from the National Center for Education Statistics indicates that the number of students over the age of 25 hit a high point of 8.9 million in 2010 and has since declined. But other data suggest that the number is rising, although the figure can be difficult to determine because adult learners may leave their institutions for periods of time and therefore not be counted even though they intend to return.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/why-its-difficult-to-track-how-many-adults-are-in-college/530944/

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UB TCIE and partners demonstrate online robot safety course that integrates VR

Sun, 2018-09-02 17:20

By Cory Nealon, University of Buffalo
Anyone with an internet connection can attend college from home. Yet a common complaint about online learning is that it lacks the feel of a physical classroom. That’s starting to change. The University at Buffalo and its partners recently demonstrated how to integrate virtual reality (VR) into a massive open online course (MOOC) focusing on collaborative robot safety.

http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2018/08/021.html

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Students navigate custom lab content by ASU and Labster with VR headsets

Sun, 2018-09-02 17:20

by ASU Now
Students in general biology classes usually don’t get to take blood samples from people, but an online class at Arizona State University not only lets students draw blood, they also can manipulate DNA — all in virtual reality. Thirty students in the general biology course under way now are using virtual-reality headsets to complete their lab requirement as part of a new partnership among ASU Online, Google and Labster. In total, 140 pairs of headsets will be available for students to borrow for the next round of classes starting in October. The new technology can be a boon to students in both online and face-to-face classes, according to Amy Pate, manager of instructional design for the School of Life Sciences.

https://asunow.asu.edu/20180823-solutions-asu-online-biology-course-first-offer-virtual-reality-lab-google-partnership

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6 Best Blockchain Online Courses For Training & Certification 2018

Sun, 2018-09-02 17:16

by Ahmed Dirar, Ripple Coin News

The blockchain revolution is in full swing. This is the marquee technology of this era because of its disruptive potential especially in financial institutions. Naturally, a lot of tech enthusiasts and anyone for that matter would want to get in on the action. This is because the distributed ledger technology represents the future. There are a myriad of ways to learn but the most convenient channel is online Blockchain courses. Some of these courses can take a dedicated person from a blockchain newbie to a developer in a matter of weeks. This is because they are packaged and tutored by experienced innovators and experts whose insights are unmatched.

6 Best Blockchain Online Courses For Training & Certification 2018

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Chris Caplice and Justin Reich win 2018 MITx Prize for Teaching and Learning in MOOCs

Sun, 2018-09-02 17:10

by MIT Open Learning

Chris Caplice, executive director of the MIT Center for Transportation and Logistics, received the award for his work on the MicroMasters Program in Supply Chain Management. MIT launched the MicroMasters credential in fall of 2015. Since then, more than than 25 universities have also launched MicroMasters programs through edX. The MicroMasters Program in Supply Chain Management includes five courses of 13 weeks each, plus a final comprehensive exam. Justin Reich, executive director of the MIT Teaching Systems Lab, was selected for his work on 11.154x (Launching Innovation in Schools), a six-week course targeted to school leaders including teachers, principals, superintendents, school board members, and others.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-chris-caplice-justin-reich-win-mitx-prize-for-moocs-0824

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The Student Debt Problem Is Worse Than We Imagined

Sun, 2018-09-02 17:05

By Ben Miller, NY Times
Consider the official statistics: Of borrowers who started repaying in 2012, just over 10 percent had defaulted three years later. That’s not too bad — but it’s not the whole story. Federal data never before released shows that the default rate continued climbing to 16 percent over the next two years, after official tracking ended, meaning more than 841,000 borrowers were in default. Nearly as many were severely delinquent or not repaying their loans (for reasons besides going back to school or being in the military). The share of students facing serious struggles rose to 30 percent over all.

https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2018/08/25/opinion/sunday/student-debt-loan-default-college.html

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Up to 1 in 5 Washington students live far away from college

Sun, 2018-09-02 17:02

by Katherine Long, Seattle Times

According to an analysis by The Chronicle of Higher Education, Washington is one of 11 states where 10.1 to 20 percent of the population lives in an “education desert,” where it’s at least a 60-minute drive to get to a college campus. The distance from college is key, the Chronicle notes, because most students stay close to home to earn a degree. In 2016, almost 40 percent of first-time, full-time freshmen said their colleges were less than 50 miles from their homes, according a national study of college freshmen. In Washington, rural superintendents are working to try to get more kids to be better prepared for college or some type of degree after high school, said John Glenewinkel, the superintendent of both the Curlew and Republic school districts in Ferry County, one of the state’s northeastern counties.

https://www.seattletimes.com/education-lab/education-deserts-in-our-state-up-to-1-in-5-washington-students-live-far-away-from-college/

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Student Debt Is Worse for Women

Sat, 2018-09-01 17:25

by Julia Piper – The Chronicle of Higher Ed

Kelcie Chandler estimates that she owes about $25,000. “It’s a pretty significant burden when they’re asking for $150 a month out of your paycheck,” she says. As an undergraduate at Christopher Newport University, Kelcie Chandler did not know that there was a significant difference in how much debt women and men hold after graduating from college. But she did notice that her female classmates were much more likely to talk about their debt than were the men she knew. Women talked about “what kinds of jobs they were getting, and the pay for those jobs, and being concerned about whether or not they can pay rent, and pay for their groceries and their car payment, and also student loans.” One question, she noticed, was on a lot of female students’ minds — “Am I going to be paying off these debts until I die?” Though the question may have been posed hyperbolically, it does reflect the daunting task students face upon graduation.

https://www.chronicle.com/article/Student-Debt-Is-Worse-for/244145

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8 More Colleges Submitted Incorrect Data for Rankings

Sat, 2018-09-01 17:24

by Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed
U.S. News will consider them unranked for the rest of this rankings year, but that punishment will last only a few weeks. Errors included graduation rates, spending per student, average faculty salaries and more. It’s just a few weeks from the next edition of the U.S. News & World Report “Best Colleges” rankings, widely questioned by educators but relied on by many students and parents (and boasted about by some of the same educators who say that the rankings are a lousy way to pick a college). But it turns out that eight of the colleges ranked a year ago submitted information that was sufficiently incorrect that it would have changed their places in the rankings. And so U.S. News has declared them to be “unranked,” a punishment that lasts until Sept. 10, when the new edition comes out.

https://www.insidehighered.com/admissions/article/2018/08/24/eight-more-colleges-identified-submitting-incorrect-data-us-news

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MOOCs Are No Longer Massive. And They Serve Different Audiences Than First Imagined.

Sat, 2018-09-01 17:15

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

EdSurge: MOOCs were once headline news around the world and now you hardly hear about them. How would you describe the state of MOOCs and where are things going?

Dhawal Shah, founder and CEO of Class Central: Yeah, they might have fallen off the big newspapers and the public eye. But they’ve figured out a monetization model. They might not be profitable but they’re making a lot of money. Udacity itself announced that they made 30 million dollars last year. So I think they’re grinding it out there. More people are using them than at any point in time before. They’re making money and now they are looking forward going into the online degree market and the corporate learning training market.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-08-21-moocs-are-no-longer-massive-and-they-serve-different-audiences-than-first-imagined

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UB TCIE and partners demonstrate online robot safety course that integrates VR

Sat, 2018-09-01 17:10

By Cory Nealon, University of Buffalo
Anyone with an internet connection can attend college from home. Yet a common complaint about online learning is that it lacks the feel of a physical classroom. That’s starting to change. The University at Buffalo and its partners recently demonstrated how to integrate virtual reality (VR) into a massive open online course (MOOC) focusing on collaborative robot safety.

http://www.buffalo.edu/news/releases/2018/08/021.html

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Students navigate custom lab content by ASU and Labster with VR headsets

Sat, 2018-09-01 17:05

by ASU Now
Students in general biology classes usually don’t get to take blood samples from people, but an online class at Arizona State University not only lets students draw blood, they also can manipulate DNA — all in virtual reality. Thirty students in the general biology course under way now are using virtual-reality headsets to complete their lab requirement as part of a new partnership among ASU Online, Google and Labster. In total, 140 pairs of headsets will be available for students to borrow for the next round of classes starting in October. The new technology can be a boon to students in both online and face-to-face classes, according to Amy Pate, manager of instructional design for the School of Life Sciences.

https://asunow.asu.edu/20180823-solutions-asu-online-biology-course-first-offer-virtual-reality-lab-google-partnership

 

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6 Best Blockchain Online Courses For Training & Certification 2018

Sat, 2018-09-01 17:02

by Ahmed Dirar, Ripple Coin News

The blockchain revolution is in full swing. This is the marquee technology of this era because of its disruptive potential especially in financial institutions. Naturally, a lot of tech enthusiasts and anyone for that matter would want to get in on the action. This is because the distributed ledger technology represents the future. There are a myriad of ways to learn but the most convenient channel is online Blockchain courses. Some of these courses can take a dedicated person from a blockchain newbie to a developer in a matter of weeks. This is because they are packaged and tutored by experienced innovators and experts whose insights are unmatched.

6 Best Blockchain Online Courses For Training & Certification 2018

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Saint Louis U Students Rooming with Alexa

Fri, 2018-08-31 17:25

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Later this week Saint Louis University will open up for move-in, when students begin occupying their dorm rooms and apartments. They’ll be greeted by Amazon Alexa-enabled devices primed and ready to answer questions about the university and the campus experience. The university conducted a pilot last spring that tested several different kinds of voice assistants, and the Amazon Alexa platform was the hands-down favorite. The broader deployment will distribute 2,300 Echo Dots, all programmed with speech recognition and voice assistants that enable students to find out how late the library is open for the day or where the registrar’s office is located, among other information.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/08/21/saint-louis-u-students-rooming-with-alexa.aspx

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Getting Higher Education Faculty to Embrace Learning Analytics

Fri, 2018-08-31 17:20

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Schools are rapidly changing course from traditional teaching methods to more technologically based options. Higher education isn’t immune to those changes, but there are some notable differences. For example, not all universities are interested in using the learning analytics. However, these numbers can provide a great deal of insight into how students are doing and areas where the university needs to improve. Looking at the numbers could provide a major benefit to students and faculty members, but everyone has to get on board with them first. Here are a handful of ways we can start getting higher education faculty to embrace the newly available data.

Getting Higher Education Faculty to Embrace Learning Analytics

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