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Engineering Education
Updated: 23 hours 17 min ago

‘MicroMasters’ Surge As MOOCs Go From Education To Qualification

Sat, 2018-02-24 16:20

by Adam Gordon, Forbes
The future shape of graduate and executive education is coming into focus with the surge of “MicroMasters” certificate programs on edX, to which 1.7 million students have registered in a year. The number of programs on offer has exploded from one to 46 during this time. This is the kind of extraordinary exponential growth that rips apart and rebuilds industries. MicroMasters certificates (MMs) are online, examined and graded, credit-eligible graduate-level courses that involve about a quarter of the coursework of a traditional Masters degree. At edX they cost about $1,000.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamgordon/2018/02/13/voice-of-employers-rings-out-as-moocs-go-from-education-to-qualification/#4caabd2c564b

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Sharing Courses? Google It

Sat, 2018-02-24 16:15

by Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Presidents of six small liberal arts colleges in rural Michigan have been talking for a decade about the possibility of adopting a consortium model to facilitate sharing courses and other resources. Online programs are increasingly popular solutions to this issue in higher education, but they don’t necessarily meet the small-classroom characteristics of a liberal arts education. Last fall, at long last, a surprising path forward emerged. Just three months later, at lightning speed for a cross-college collaboration, three of those institutions — Alma, Albion and Calvin Colleges — have begun a pilot course-sharing program that makes use of Google hardware, including its brand-new Jamboard for interactive videoconferencing.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/02/14/michigan-liberal-arts-colleges-use-google-share-courses

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Future economy demands workers who can learn online

Sat, 2018-02-24 16:10

BY ANNE TRUMBORE, the Hill

The New York Times recently published an article entitled Online Courses Are Harming The Students Who Need the Most Help. The piece, by Susan Dynarski, a well-respected professor of education, public policy and economics at the University of Michigan, makes the reasoned, evidence-based case that online courses that are offered with little to no instructor interaction are detrimental to students who struggle in traditional classrooms. Why should we care if learners learn to learn online? Because the future will demand self-directed lifelong learning from a significant portion of the workforce. Current data suggests workers could have have 12 jobs in their lifetimes.  There will be more demand for post-baccalaureate training and education, and it will have to be delivered online. But if we relegate underperforming students to in-person-only instruction, as Dynarski suggests, we risk widening the digital divide, not closing the achievement gap.

http://thehill.com/opinion/education/373644-future-economy-demands-workers-who-can-learn-online

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‘MicroMasters’ Surge As MOOCs Go From Education To Qualification

Sat, 2018-02-24 16:04

by Adam Gordon, Forbes
The future shape of graduate and executive education is coming into focus with the surge of “MicroMasters” certificate programs on edX, to which 1.7 million students have registered in a year. The number of programs on offer has exploded from one to 46 during this time. This is the kind of extraordinary exponential growth that rips apart and rebuilds industries. MicroMasters certificates (MMs) are online, examined and graded, credit-eligible graduate-level courses that involve about a quarter of the coursework of a traditional Masters degree. At edX they cost about $1,000.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/adamgordon/2018/02/13/voice-of-employers-rings-out-as-moocs-go-from-education-to-qualification/#4caabd2c564b

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Sharing Courses? Google It

Sat, 2018-02-24 16:03

by Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Presidents of six small liberal arts colleges in rural Michigan have been talking for a decade about the possibility of adopting a consortium model to facilitate sharing courses and other resources. Online programs are increasingly popular solutions to this issue in higher education, but they don’t necessarily meet the small-classroom characteristics of a liberal arts education. Last fall, at long last, a surprising path forward emerged. Just three months later, at lightning speed for a cross-college collaboration, three of those institutions — Alma, Albion and Calvin Colleges — have begun a pilot course-sharing program that makes use of Google hardware, including its brand-new Jamboard for interactive videoconferencing.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/02/14/michigan-liberal-arts-colleges-use-google-share-courses

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Web-Based, Interactive Learning Helps Middle Schoolers Excel in Science

Fri, 2018-02-23 16:25

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal

Middle schoolers did better with science lessons when they could learn online, watching videos, playing educational games, running virtual experiments and collaborating with classmates. Under-achievers did especially well, with access to pop-up vocabulary definitions, interactive diagrams, digital note-taking, watching videos with captions and access to text-to-speech that allowed them to hear information read aloud to them. That’s what a research project found when it introduced four interactive web-based science units to 2,303 students and 71 teachers who had access to computers or tablets in 13 middle schools in three school districts in Oregon and Georgia.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/02/12/web-based-interactive-learning-helps-middle-schoolers-excel-in-science.aspx

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Chasing Gold Medals and Degrees: Olympians Benefit from eLearning

Fri, 2018-02-23 16:20

By Cait Etherington, e-Learning Inside

If you watched the Olympics, you have likely already wondered how all those young people keep up with their studies while training several hours per day and traveling around the world to attend competitions. In the past, many athletes had to put their studies on hold or count on the flexibility and kindness of their teachers and professors. Over the past decade, online education has made chasing gold medals and degrees simultaneously just a bit easier. Indeed, early gold medalists at the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics, including Canada’s Kaetlyn Osmand and the United States’ Red Gerard, are both currently enrolled in online programs.

Chasing Gold Medals and Degrees: Olympians Benefit from eLearning

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Law School Accreditor Proposes Easing Limits on Online Education

Fri, 2018-02-23 16:15

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

The American Bar Association panel that accredits law schools has proposed loosening its restrictions on online education. Currently, the rules of the Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar say that no more than 15 of an ABA-accredited law school’s required credits can be completed in distance learning courses, defined as those in which at least a third of the course work is done online. Most law school programs include between 83 and 90 credits over all. The ABA has in recent years granted (and rejected) several law schools’ requests for variances from the restriction on online courses. Under the proposal initially approved by the ABA council last week, students could earn up to a third of their credits (between 28 and 30) in distance courses. The ABA proposal would also allow first-year law students to take up to 10 credits online; law schools are now barred from offering distance education to first-year students.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/02/13/law-school-accreditor-proposes-easing-limits-online-education

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Law School Accreditor Proposes Easing Limits on Online Education

Fri, 2018-02-23 16:10

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

The American Bar Association panel that accredits law schools has proposed loosening its restrictions on online education. Currently, the rules of the Council of the ABA Section of Legal Education and Admissions to the Bar say that no more than 15 of an ABA-accredited law school’s required credits can be completed in distance learning courses, defined as those in which at least a third of the course work is done online. Most law school programs include between 83 and 90 credits over all. The ABA has in recent years granted (and rejected) several law schools’ requests for variances from the restriction on online courses. Under the proposal initially approved by the ABA council last week, students could earn up to a third of their credits (between 28 and 30) in distance courses. The ABA proposal would also allow first-year law students to take up to 10 credits online; law schools are now barred from offering distance education to first-year students.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/02/13/law-school-accreditor-proposes-easing-limits-online-education

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How Technology And Online Learning Will Impact The Future Of Executive Education

Fri, 2018-02-23 16:05

by Thomas Nugent, Business Because

At the MERIT Higher Education Summit in Lisbon last month, change was in the air. As executives and business school representatives mingled over Pastéis de Nata and espresso pods aplenty, the conversation was geared towards one thing: lifelong learning and the future of work. Online learning and technology, it seems, will impact heavily on the executive education space in the coming years, revolutionizing the way we approach the development of our personal and professional skills. For Carlo Giardinetti, associate dean of Business School Lausanne, that raises an important question.: “How do we redesign the on-campus experience knowing that the importance of technology and off-campus learning will continue to grow?”

https://www.businessbecause.com/news/emba/5069/technology-online-learning-future-executive-education

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UT System pulls the plug on $75 million online learning institute

Fri, 2018-02-23 16:02

BY MARIA MENDEZ, Daily Texan
The UT System’s Institute for Transformational Learning was supposed to pioneer an online brand for UT, but it shut down two weeks ago. After investing a total of $75 million in the institute, the UT System decided the institute’s five-year revenue of $1 million was not enough for it to continue operating, according to the Texas Tribune. Francisco Cigarroa, former UT System chancellor, first allocated the institute with $50 million in 2011 from the UT System’s $20 billion Permanent University Fund. The institute was intended to make a UT education more accessible, UT System spokesperson Karen Adler said.

http://dailytexanonline.com/2018/02/12/ut-system-pulls-the-plug-on-75-million-online-learning-institute

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How Technology And Online Learning Will Impact The Future Of Executive Education

Thu, 2018-02-22 16:24

by Thomas Nugent, Business Because

At the MERIT Higher Education Summit in Lisbon last month, change was in the air. As executives and business school representatives mingled over Pastéis de Nata and espresso pods aplenty, the conversation was geared towards one thing: lifelong learning and the future of work. Online learning and technology, it seems, will impact heavily on the executive education space in the coming years, revolutionizing the way we approach the development of our personal and professional skills. For Carlo Giardinetti, associate dean of Business School Lausanne, that raises an important question.: “How do we redesign the on-campus experience knowing that the importance of technology and off-campus learning will continue to grow?”

https://www.businessbecause.com/news/emba/5069/technology-online-learning-future-executive-education

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UT System pulls the plug on $75 million online learning institute

Thu, 2018-02-22 16:20

BY MARIA MENDEZ, Daily Texan
The UT System’s Institute for Transformational Learning was supposed to pioneer an online brand for UT, but it shut down two weeks ago. After investing a total of $75 million in the institute, the UT System decided the institute’s five-year revenue of $1 million was not enough for it to continue operating, according to the Texas Tribune. Francisco Cigarroa, former UT System chancellor, first allocated the institute with $50 million in 2011 from the UT System’s $20 billion Permanent University Fund. The institute was intended to make a UT education more accessible, UT System spokesperson Karen Adler said.

http://dailytexanonline.com/2018/02/12/ut-system-pulls-the-plug-on-75-million-online-learning-institute

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Jane Goodall to lead new CU Boulder online course on compassionate leaders

Thu, 2018-02-22 16:15

By Elizabeth Hernandez, Daily Camera

Jane Goodall, known worldwide for her research on the relationship between chimpanzees and humans, will lead a new massive, open online course for the University of Colorado about developing compassionate leaders. The noted scientist and conservationist is holding the free course kicking off this summer through a partnership between CU and the Jane Goodall Institute’s youth program, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, according to a CU news release. “There are many reasons to be hopeful for the future of our planet but perhaps most inspiring is the energy, commitment, and hard work of young people who we can empower as they grow to be better, more compassionate decision-makers within their society,” said Goodall, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace.

http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_31661507/jane-goodall-lead-new-cu-boulder-online-course

 

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Jane Goodall to lead new CU Boulder online course on compassionate leaders

Thu, 2018-02-22 16:09

By Elizabeth Hernandez, Daily Camera

Jane Goodall, known worldwide for her research on the relationship between chimpanzees and humans, will lead a new massive, open online course for the University of Colorado about developing compassionate leaders. The noted scientist and conservationist is holding the free course kicking off this summer through a partnership between CU and the Jane Goodall Institute’s youth program, Jane Goodall’s Roots & Shoots, according to a CU news release. “There are many reasons to be hopeful for the future of our planet but perhaps most inspiring is the energy, commitment, and hard work of young people who we can empower as they grow to be better, more compassionate decision-makers within their society,” said Goodall, founder of the Jane Goodall Institute and UN Messenger of Peace.

http://www.dailycamera.com/cu-news/ci_31661507/jane-goodall-lead-new-cu-boulder-online-course

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Supporting Post-Traditional Students Drives Broad and Significant Benefits

Thu, 2018-02-22 16:05

by Louis Soares & Jonathan Gagliardi, American Council on Education, Evolllution

The analysis revealed patterns that have major implications for how post-traditional students engage in learning, and for how policymakers and campus leaders design policies, programs, and services that meet their needs. Post-traditional learners need academic programs that are stackable and which offer more structured entry and exit points to and from employment. Many would benefit from flexible learning models that give credit for applied and experiential learning, and which focus less on traditional measures of seat time. Better articulation agreements across campuses and within systems could help hedge against the potential for credit-loss that occurs in the transfer process. Services that make it easier for them to be parents, soldiers, full-time employees, and students could also help post-traditional learners integrate work, life and school.

Supporting Post-Traditional Students Drives Broad and Significant Benefits

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Forging Pathways to Good Jobs Without a BA: Assessing the Value of Sub-Baccalaureate Credentials

Thu, 2018-02-22 16:04

by Neil Ridley, Evolllution

For four-year universities across the United States, the focus—and often the metric used to judge their success—is degree completion. But how important is a bachelor’s degree to finding good work and launching a career? Depending on the industry and geographic location, the Georgetown Center for Education and the Workforce has found that the degree might not serve as the only pathway to employment that we once thought. In their recent report, Good Jobs That Pay without a BA: A State-by-State Analysis, researchers dove deep into their prior national report findings to understand how sub-baccalaureate credentials support students’ pathways to good jobs across the United States. In this interview, Neil Ridley reflects on some of their findings and shares his thoughts on how colleges and universities could leverage this data to improve employment pathways for learners.

 

Forging Pathways to Good Jobs Without a BA: Assessing the Value of Sub-Baccalaureate Credentials

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4 WAYS ONLINE CLASSES CAN MAKE YOU MORE ATTRACTIVE TO EMPLOYERS

Wed, 2018-02-21 16:25

By Tabitha Prisinzano, Columbia College of Missouri

Online education is the way of the future and employers are viewing online education more favorably in recent years.  Since more and more jobs have entered the digital realm, studies show that employers increasingly view online degrees favorably, as opposed to just a few years ago. Increasingly, nonprofit, brick-and-mortar schools have started offering distance-learning programs, and at some point, most students enrolled in conventional college programs will take at least one class online. Plus, even as the stigma of online education continues to fade, the benefits of a computer-based classroom are becoming increasingly apparent. In fact, online classes teach students skills and learning techniques that are invaluable in a digital workplace, yet often go untaught in traditional classroom settings.

4 Ways Online Classes Can Make You More Attractive to Employers

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Maltzman defends online learning programs after faculty report

Wed, 2018-02-21 16:21

By Meredith Roaten, the Hatchet

After a report raised questions about unequal standards and oversight of courses taught online, Provost Forrest Maltzman defended the quality of the University’s online learning programs in a presentation to the Faculty Senate Friday. Maltzman insisted the University’s online offerings are equally as strong as traditional classes, citing data showing that programs have high student satisfaction and often outperform peers in national rankings. But he also recommended departments and programs act to increase monitoring of those courses using surveys and retaining lectures. “There is no reasonable examination of this that anyone can walk away and say our online programs are worse than our other programs,” Maltzman told the Faculty Senate.

Maltzman defends online learning programs after report raises concern

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How to Choose an Online Science Course

Wed, 2018-02-21 16:15

by Jordan Friedman, US News

Students in online science classes should check how much time they must commit to coursework each week, especially if there’s a lab requirement. Between lab requirements and the use of classroom equipment to conduct research, the hard sciences – biology, chemistry and physics, to name a few – may not initially seem suited for the online format. But some schools have found ways for students to explore these fields remotely.Experts say online courses in the hard sciences may also attract nondegree students taking classes for general interest or to fulfill prerequisites before transferring elsewhere. Whatever their goals may be, here are six questions experts recommend prospective or incoming students ask as they research online science courses and speak with their academic or enrollment advisers.

https://www.usnews.com/higher-education/online-education/articles/2018-02-12/ask-6-questions-to-choose-an-online-science-course

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