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Engineering Education
Updated: 19 hours 44 min ago

Saturday March for Science in Washington and around the World

Fri, 2017-04-21 03:57

By Andrew Kreighbaum, Inside Higher Ed

The national march in D.C. this Saturday, along with satellite events across the country (and around the world) likely won’t match the turnout of the Women’s March on Jan. 21 — a protest some observers speculated was among the largest in U.S. history. But the March for Science has received intense levels of interest since organizers in January began discussing the possibility and subsequently launched Facebook and Twitter accounts. Rush Holt, CEO of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, said this week that the March for Science is a nonpartisan event that will focus on a positive message about what’s needed for science to thrive. “It’s time to get off the sidelines and make a difference.”

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/21/university-researchers-and-scientists-make-rare-political-engagement-over-fears

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How to Implement Blended Learning in the K-12 Classroom

Thu, 2017-04-20 17:25

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

First and foremost, educators need to know their students. Teachers at the K-12 level must be aware of the level of access to technology their students have at home. Blended learning will look very different in a school where the majority of students don’t have access to high-speed internet at home versus a school where every student can log in at home. For classrooms where most students can’t get online from home, blended learning is still an option. Teachers can set up a schedule where students alternate between digital and traditional learning modes in the classroom. Two or three days a week could be devoted to completing online activities, while the remaining days might look like a more traditional classroom.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/implement-blended-learning-k-12-classrooms/

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Using the ‘virtual’ to change the ‘reality’ of education

Thu, 2017-04-20 17:19

BY CAMERON PROBERT, TRI-CITY HERALD

Jonah Firestone, a Washington State University assistant professor of science education, wants to use the equipment to explore ways that virtual reality can help students, teachers and the education process. “The lab is designed to look at the melding of virtual and augmented reality into education,” he said. The Virtual Integrated Technology for Assessment Learning laboratory opened recently with the help of a $50,000 grant from the WSU Tri-Cities chancellor’s office. Firestone, who spent 20 years teaching in public and private schools, said he became more interested in the role of technological advances in the classroom during his career. Virtual reality is just the latest form of computer technology to make its way into classrooms.

http://www.eschoolnews.com/2017/04/07/virtual-reality-change-education/

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How to make sure your university’s online content is accessible to all

Thu, 2017-04-20 17:15

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

A new whitepaper from 3PlayMedia delves into some of the accessibility issues and offers guidance. Students and faculty who are deaf or have hearing challenges, who are blind or have low vision, who are color blind, or who have physical disabilities or temporary disabilities (such as those due to injury) all require accessibility features to help them consume digital information. Thirty-three percent of students enrolled in four-year institutions complete a bachelor’s degree, compared with 48 percent of students without disabilities. A 2011 World Health Organization report notes that 1 in 5 Americans age 12 or older have hearing loss significant enough to interfere with day-to-day communications.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/curriculum/university-content-accessible/

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Study: Adjuncts bring real-world experience, yet desire closer connection to the academic community

Thu, 2017-04-20 17:10

By eCampus News

Cengage survey presents adjunct faculty feedback on collaboration, digital technology and professional development. A new study from Cengage finds that although adjunct faculty are very student-focused and believe they offer unique value, including real-world expertise and industry contacts, they feel disconnected and less valued than full-time faculty. And, while more than half of adjuncts are using digital learning tools, they want more opportunities for collaboration and professional development using these materials, the survey finds. Cengage and Zeldis Research Associates conducted both qualitative and quantitative research over a six-month period and connected with nearly 500 adjunct instructors.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/campus-administration/adjuncts-academic-community/

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6 ways to engage alumni using Facebook Live

Thu, 2017-04-20 17:06

BY MICHAEL ELLISON, eCampus News

Launched in April 2016, Facebook Live allows the most-used social network’s users to share up to eight hours of live video with their followers and friends. According to a Facebook spokesperson, the vast majority of these recordings come from people instead of public figures and publishers, and the number of people broadcasting live at any given minute has grown by four times since its launch. Further, users comment over 10 times more on Facebook Live videos than on regular videos, demonstrating that broadcasts engage users with their real-time reactions and comments. Many colleges and universities have already begun integrating Facebook Live into their social media marketing schemes. Out of the 45-school Alumni Monitor coverage group, 36 schools have hosted at least one Facebook Live event within their main university or alumni-focused social media page. For those schools looking to begin (or expand on) their current Facebook Live presence, here are six ideas for engaging alumni using Facebook Live.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/featured/featured-on-ecampus-news/engaging-alumni-facebook-live/

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California State University System Streamlines OER Adoption for Faculty and Students

Thu, 2017-04-20 17:02

By Sri Ravipati, Campus Technology

The California State University (CSU) system — in a move to deliver affordable course materials to more than 50,800 faculty and 497,000 students across its 23 campuses — has partnered with a company that provides access to millions of digital textbooks and digital-authoring tools for open educational resources (OER). CSU announced a new partnership with VitalSource yesterday at the Online Learning Consortium Innovate conference in New Orleans.

https://www.enterprisetech.com/2017/04/09/train-locomotives-without-wheels-moats-cyber-security-innovations/

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80% drop in per student support for higher ed in Illlinois skews national figures

Thu, 2017-04-20 04:03
by Rick Seltzer, Inside Higher Ed Support for public higher education rose in 33 states and declined in 17 in 2016 — including a massive drop in Illinois. It’s impossible to examine state higher education finances in 2016 without separating the collapse in Illinois from a more nuanced picture across the rest of the country. State and local support for higher education in Illinois plunged as the state’s lawmakers and governor were unable to reach a budget agreement and instead passed severely pared-down stopgap funding. Educational appropriations per full-time equivalent student in the state skidded 80 percent year over year, from $10,986 to $2,196. Enrollment in public institutions dropped by 11 percent, or 46,000 students. “Our data is made up of so many different states,” said Sophia Laderman, SHEEO data analyst and the report’s primary author. “Without Illinois, we’re seeing an increase in appropriations per student, after adjusting for inflation. But it’s smaller than in the previous year.” https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/04/20/state-support-higher-education-increased-2016-not-counting-illinois Share on Facebook

Researchers find millions of .edu accounts, passwords available on Dark Web

Wed, 2017-04-19 17:20

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

A recent report from the Digital Citizens Alliance shows 14 million .edu email addresses and email passwords from the 300 largest higher ed institutions in the U.S. were available for sale on the “Dark Web.” Campus Technology reports that 11 million of those uncovered in the most recent search of the Dark Web were found in the last year, and that many of the user names and passwords were likely compromised when users accessed them in non-academic settings. Hacktivist organization Team GhostShell’s leader, a 25-year-old Romanian hacker nicknamed “Dead-Mellox,” provided researchers behind the report with insights on the vulnerability of .edu addresses, as well as the surplus of valuable data, intellectual property and research that higher ed institutions have compared to commercial businesses or government agencies.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/researchers-find-millions-of-edu-accounts-passwords-available-on-dark-web/439711/

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School innovator incorporates blended learning in teacher training

Wed, 2017-04-19 17:18

By Corinne Lestch, EdScoop

Yorktown Community Schools has a culture of “embracing what’s next.” Those are words from the district’s director of eLearning and Curricular Innovation, Holly Stachle. “All of our stakeholders, including students, parents and the administration, are accepting of a 21st century learning environments.” Stachler was named a NextGen Leader by the Consortium for School Networking (CoSN) and EdScoop in a national program to recognize rising leaders in K-12 education technology. She will be recognized along with her fellow finalists at the annual CoSN conference this month in Chicago. Stachler plays a key role in development curriculum and policy, and she has to some extent filled the capacity of technology director. She also does all the professional development for teachers on new tools and devices.

http://edscoop.com/school-innovator-incorporates-blended-learning-in-teacher-training-at-indiana-district

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Computing Devices to Remain Stagnant as Traditional PCs Slide Ever Downward

Wed, 2017-04-19 17:15

By David Nagel, Campus Technology

Worldwide, enthusiasm for new computing devices seems to be tapering off. According to a new report from market research firm Gartner, overall device shipments will remain flat in 2017, even as traditional PCs (including laptops) go into a decline that’s forecast to last at least through 2019. According to Gartner, in 2016, 50 million ultramobile premium devices shipped. In 2017, that will climb to 60 million, followed by 72 million in 2018 and 82 million in 2019. Traditional PCs, including laptops, meanwhile, will crumble from 220 million devices in 2016 to 205 million this year, then drop down to 196 million in 2018 and 191 million in 2019.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/06/computing-devices-to-remain-stagnant-as-traditional-pcs-slide-ever-downward.aspx

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New Frontiers in Cyber Security: Locomotives without Wheels, Moats, Deep Learning at the Edge

Wed, 2017-04-19 17:10

by Doug Black, Enterprise Tech

Industry analyst Bob Sorensen recently told us something most IT managers already know deep in their apprehensive hearts: cyber security is in a sorry state. Security at many companies is somewhat marginalized, an unfavored area that lies outside core IT operations and procedures, a focal point at many companies of ineffectuality and denial that can be characterized as: Don’t just do something, sit there! Yet everyone grasps the bottom line and reputation risks of poor security. This anxiousness, coupled with uncertainty about their own cyber security strategies, results in many companies – at least those that haven’t been attacked yet – taking refuge in the feeble rationalization: “We haven’t been breached yet so we must be doing something right.”

Yeah, sure.

https://www.enterprisetech.com/2017/04/09/train-locomotives-without-wheels-moats-cyber-security-innovations/

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Ladies Learning Code on a mission

Wed, 2017-04-19 17:05

by Halifax Citizen

The organization has spread to more than 22 cities across the country in aims of improving national digital literacy. Ladies Learning Code established itself in Halifax in 2013. “Our founder at the time wanted to learn coding skills herself, so she looked online and found Ladies Learning Code as something she really wanted to run in the community,” says Liu. Adult workshops cover a variety of digital curating experiences, offering hands-on learning for everything from introductory HTML and CSS, to WordPress, Photoshop and more. They are taught by industry-leading professionals. Despite its name, these workshops are open to all genders. “Our mission is to promote women in tech in society,” says Liu. “I always encourage a man learner brings a lady with them so we can still promote this cause.” Working in technology herself, Liu explains she sees firsthand how underrepresented women are in the industry.

http://thechronicleherald.ca/dartmouthtribune/1458190-ladies-learning-code-on-a-mission

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Using Forums and Discussion Boards to Create Virtual Learning Experiences

Wed, 2017-04-19 17:02

by Matthew Lynch, tech Edvocate

The reason that many teachers strive for a more virtual experience instead of the traditional talking points is that the interaction makes the lesson more memorable to the students. Concepts and ideas that seem too complicated under time-honored instruction methods are easier to grasp when the students can experience the lessons. This does not mean that you need a VR machine to create a virtual experience either. There are a number of tools that can help you establish a virtual environment that makes lessons more entertaining while making the concepts easier to understand.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/using-forums-discussion-boards-create-virtual-learning-experiences/

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The Hidden Costs of Active Learning

Tue, 2017-04-18 17:25

By Thomas Mennell, Campus Technology

Flipped and active learning truly are a better way for students to learn, but they also may be a fast track to instructor burnout. I end every publication and every talk with the catchphrase “I’ll never teach another way again,” and I mean it. Students learn more deeply, more effectively, and they integrate material much more through a flipped/active learning format than with more traditional, lecture-based instruction. To teach in any other way, to me, seems almost unethical — especially given how much money today’s college student spends on his/her education. How could I deliver an inferior product to my students when I know that flipped learning is so much better? That said, there are many days when I wish I’d never heard of flipped learning at all — times when I wish I actually could teach another way again.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/05/the-hidden-costs-of-active-learning.aspx

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Using Simulations to Create Virtual Learning Experiences

Tue, 2017-04-18 17:20

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

There are many types of simulations that can help instruct children, teens, and college students. For example, there are flight simulators that can be used to help highlight different areas, such as the historic flight of Amelia Earhart across the Atlantic Ocean and various Physics concepts. Simulations do not have to be expensive. With a little research, you are likely to find a free or low-cost online simulation that will help students better understand concepts and ideas. For example, you can teach about the stock market, economics, and business management on SimCEO. There are interview simulators to help students get practice when applying for a job. There are even simulations that are designed to help students sympathize with someone being bullied and help to resolve the problem in a positive way.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/using-simulations-create-virtual-learning-experiences/

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Carl Sandburg college offers new online degree with help from robots

Tue, 2017-04-18 17:15

BY JESYKA DERETA, WQAD

Courses like labs and speech caused hurdles for an online degree because those classes were required to be taken in person. Now, students can take those classes and many others through a robot! It’s all made possible by a telepresence that allows students to be enrolled online but go to class in person if they are struggling with a topic or course. Students go to class in person or as the robot through Skype on a wireless computer or tablet on wheels. The robot is controlled by the student on a computer from wherever they choose. “With the robot, it can wheel up and be a part of the group and the student’s face is on the screen. They can talk to the group and the person feel like they are there. It’s really cool,” said Lori Sundberg, President of Carl Sandburg.

http://wqad.com/2017/04/06/carl-sandburg-college-offers-online-degree-with-help-from-robot-technology/

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How to make sure your university’s online content is accessible to all

Tue, 2017-04-18 17:10

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

A new whitepaper from 3PlayMedia delves into some of the accessibility issues and offers guidance. Students and faculty who are deaf or have hearing challenges, who are blind or have low vision, who are color blind, or who have physical disabilities or temporary disabilities (such as those due to injury) all require accessibility features to help them consume digital information. Thirty-three percent of students enrolled in four-year institutions complete a bachelor’s degree, compared with 48 percent of students without disabilities. A 2011 World Health Organization report notes that 1 in 5 Americans age 12 or older have hearing loss significant enough to interfere with day-to-day communications.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/curriculum/university-content-accessible/

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Researchers find millions of .edu accounts, passwords available on Dark Web

Tue, 2017-04-18 17:05

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

A recent report from the Digital Citizens Alliance shows 14 million .edu email addresses and email passwords from the 300 largest higher ed institutions in the U.S. were available for sale on the “Dark Web.” Campus Technology reports that 11 million of those uncovered in the most recent search of the Dark Web were found in the last year, and that many of the user names and passwords were likely compromised when users accessed them in non-academic settings. Hacktivist organization Team GhostShell’s leader, a 25-year-old Romanian hacker nicknamed “Dead-Mellox,” provided researchers behind the report with insights on the vulnerability of .edu addresses, as well as the surplus of valuable data, intellectual property and research that higher ed institutions have compared to commercial businesses or government agencies.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/researchers-find-millions-of-edu-accounts-passwords-available-on-dark-web/439711/

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Social Learning: The Future Is Here!

Tue, 2017-04-18 17:02

by ATD

In essence, technology and social media have led to a democratization of learning and education that is unprecedented. Learning is everyone’s domain. Continuous learning and growth are not only possible, but expected. Curiosity is the only currency you need. So what’s the L&D professional’s role in this evolution? Workplace learning must adapt to this new world and provide the tools and vehicles to leverage the collective wisdom in the organization. We must support collaborative learning and work. We must build learning and professional networks that cross organizational boundaries, and even go beyond organizations. We must discover and share best practices and ideas and solutions. We can curate content, build platforms, encourage peer learning, and share information.

https://www.td.org/Publications/Blogs/L-and-D-Blog/2017/04/Social-Learning-the-Future-Is-Here

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