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Engineering Education
Updated: 20 hours 2 min ago

Can Anything Stop Cyber Attacks?

Tue, 2018-07-24 17:02

by Knowledge@Wharton

The recent indictment of 12 Russian intelligence officers by the Justice Department for interfering in the 2016 U.S. presidential election underscores the severity and immense reach of cyber attacks, like no other in history. To influence the election’s outcome, authorities said these agents hacked into the computer networks of the Democratic Party to get information, and strategically released it on the internet. In the private sector, companies have to step up their game against cyber attacks that are becoming all too common. Against that backdrop, fighting cyber threats has never been more important. It is the “greatest terror on the economy, bar none,” but policy makers’ response to it has been moving at a snail’s pace, according to high-ranking cyber-security and risk management experts who spoke at a panel discussion on cyber risks at the Penn Wharton Budget Model’s first Spring Policy Forum, which was held last month in Washington. Experts called for greater awareness of cyber threats at all levels, an inclusive approach to protect all parties affected, and steps to “harden our defenses to make the cost too high for the payoff to carry out these cyber attacks.”

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/creating-tougher-defenses-cyber-attacks/

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‘The Future of Tech Is Female’

Mon, 2018-07-23 17:24

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

The share of women in many science and technology fields has increased dramatically in the last generation — in some cases reaching parity with men. But women’s gains have lagged in computer science, some technology fields and in the businesses where many of the graduates of those programs aspire to work. A new book says that both colleges and businesses can do better. Failing to improve, the book argues, means wasting talent that could promote innovation in both academe and industry. The book is The Future of Tech Is Female: How to Achieve Gender Diversity (New York University Press). The author is Douglas M. Branson, the W. Edward Sell Chair in Law at the University of Pittsburgh.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/17/author-discusses-his-new-book-about-women-tech-industry-and-engineering-education

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How ‘The Efficiency Paradox’ Gets EdTech Right

Mon, 2018-07-23 17:20

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

I read lots of nonfiction. Unless these books are about higher education, higher education is unlikely to be mentioned. The Efficiency Paradox is different. Higher education plays a starring role. This is one of the first books written by someone who works primarily outside of academia that gets at a fundamental truth about higher education right. That fundamental truth is that technology to advance learning can be great, as long as that technology is a complement – and not a substitute – for a well-trained and fully-supported educator. In short, nothing matters more than the professor.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/how-efficiency-paradox-gets-edtech-right

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Open educational resources have saved students millions of dollars, but can they also improve students’ grades?

Mon, 2018-07-23 17:16

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed
A large-scale study at the University of Georgia has found that college students provided with free course materials at the beginning of a class get significantly better academic results than those that do not. The Georgia study, published this week, compared the final grades of students enrolled in eight large undergraduate courses between 2010 and 2016. Each of these courses was taught by a professor who switched from a commercial textbook costing $100 or more to a free digital textbook, or open educational resource, at some point during that six-year period.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/16/measuring-impact-oer-university-georgia

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Mixing and Matching Cal State Online Courses — Free

Mon, 2018-07-23 17:10

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Many institutions allow residential students to dabble in online courses as they work through their schedule of face-to-face classes. The California State University System takes that offering one step further, presenting full-time students at all of the system’s 23 institutions with the option to enroll for free in one online course per semester at another Cal State institution.  The system has allowed residential students to take one free online course per semester at other campuses since 2013 — and more than 2,400 students have taken advantage, according to Mike Uhlenkamp, interim senior director of public affairs. The provision was codified in California state law in 2015. But the pool of online courses was more limited, and the institution didn’t advertise this option as widely as it will now, Uhlenkamp said.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/13/cal-state-allows-students-take-online-courses-other-system

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All learning ‘is going to happen digitally’, Coursera boss says

Mon, 2018-07-23 17:04

By Anna McKie, Times Higher Education
Eventually “all learning is going to happen digitally”, according to Jeff Maggioncalda, the chief executive of online learning platform Coursera. Increasing use of technology on campus will erode division between online and offline education, according to Jeff Maggioncalda But Mr Maggioncalda was not rehearsing the tired trope that massive open online courses offered by the likes of Coursera will drive traditional universities out of business. Instead, he was predicting that learning on university campuses will increasingly take place online over the next five to 10 years.

https://www.timeshighereducation.com/news/all-learning-going-happen-digitally-coursera-boss-says

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‘The Future of Tech Is Female’

Mon, 2018-07-23 17:03

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

The share of women in many science and technology fields has increased dramatically in the last generation — in some cases reaching parity with men. But women’s gains have lagged in computer science, some technology fields and in the businesses where many of the graduates of those programs aspire to work. A new book says that both colleges and businesses can do better. Failing to improve, the book argues, means wasting talent that could promote innovation in both academe and industry. The book is The Future of Tech Is Female: How to Achieve Gender Diversity (New York University Press). The author is Douglas M. Branson, the W. Edward Sell Chair in Law at the University of Pittsburgh.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/17/author-discusses-his-new-book-about-women-tech-industry-and-engineering-education

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Can We Design Online Learning Platforms That Feel More Intimate Than Massive?

Sun, 2018-07-22 17:25

by Giving Compass

Most of our energy has been focused on designing physical learning spaces, even as more teaching and learning shifts online. Unfortunately, most massive open online course (MOOC) platforms still feel like drafty lecture halls instead of intimate seminar rooms. The majority of online learning environments are no more than video-hosting platforms with quizzes and a discussion forum. These default features force online instructors to use a style of teaching that feels more like shouting to the masses than engaging in meaningful conversations.

https://givingcompass.org/article/can-we-design-online-learning-platforms-that-feel-more-intimate-than-massive/

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New York to resist Trump rollback of affirmative action in college admissions process

Sun, 2018-07-22 17:20

By James Paterson, Education Dive
New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo has directed that state’s universities to continue policies that promote diversity despite the Trump administration ruling that institutions don’t have to consider race in admissions decisions, according to the Northeast Public Radio. Cuomo asked the chairmen of the boards of trustees for City University of New York and the State University of New York by mid-August to report on how they will further increase diversity on their campuses.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/new-york-to-resist-trump-rollback-of-affirmative-action-in-college-admissio/527722/

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5 Amazing Student Success Stories from India

Sun, 2018-07-22 17:15

By Prachi Mishra, Udacity

Each of these 5 students earned a scholarship from Google and Udacity, and they’ve used their opportunities to achieve incredible things in their lives and their careers. Back in 2017, Google Scholarships launched in India with a mission to help 30,000 students pursue their dreams of venturing into mobile and web development. Today, so many exceptional students have earned new opportunities for themselves through the Udacity-Google Scholarship program. Their stories are amazing, and we share five of them with you here.

5 Amazing Student Success Stories from India

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Open educational resources have saved students millions of dollars, but can they also improve students’ grades?

Sun, 2018-07-22 17:10

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed
A large-scale study at the University of Georgia has found that college students provided with free course materials at the beginning of a class get significantly better academic results than those that do not. The Georgia study, published this week, compared the final grades of students enrolled in eight large undergraduate courses between 2010 and 2016. Each of these courses was taught by a professor who switched from a commercial textbook costing $100 or more to a free digital textbook, or open educational resource, at some point during that six-year period.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/16/measuring-impact-oer-university-georgia

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Cengage Contributes Openly Licensed Content to OER Community

Sun, 2018-07-22 17:08

The share of women in many science and technology fields has increased dramatically in the last generation — in some cases reaching parity with men. But women’s gains have lagged in computer science, some technology fields and in the businesses where many of the graduates of those programs aspire to work. A new book says that both colleges and businesses can do better. Failing to improve, the book argues, means wasting talent that could promote innovation in both academe and industry. The book is The Future of Tech Is Female: How to Achieve Gender Diversity (New York University Press). The author is Douglas M. Branson, the W. Edward Sell Chair in Law at the University of Pittsburgh.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/17/author-discusses-his-new-book-about-women-tech-industry-and-engineering-education

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Experts say we’re approaching a third wave of higher-ed reform

Sun, 2018-07-22 17:05

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News
An evolving workforce will demand lifelong learning, and higher-ed reform will have to mold postsecondary education to follow suit.  As the global economy changes and demands more highly-skilled workers, some experts are tracking what they call a third wave of postsecondary education reform focused on making sure graduates have career-long alignment between their education and the job market. The new report from Jobs for the Future (JFF) and Pearson notes that a career path won’t have a single-job trajectory, but instead will require a lifetime of learning. Higher education will have to experience significant reform to create graduates equipped for such a workforce, the report’s authors claim. “As the future of work is realized, what makes us human is what will make us employable; education systems are already evolving to develop and measure the skills that matter, but there is much more that can be done,” says Maria Flynn, JFF’s president and chief executive officer.

Experts say we’re approaching a third wave of higher-ed reform

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The Sooner You Get Your First AI Job, the Better for Your Career

Sat, 2018-07-21 17:25

by Stephanie Glass, My San Antonio

Artificial intelligence is already reshaping society as we know it in both business and consumer realms. Early use cases with Alexa, autonomous vehicles and AI-driven supply chains provide just a glimpse of the disruption that AI is poised to deliver in the near future and for years to come. Yet despite all the AI hype and initial successes, it remains in its infancy. That makes now the ideal time for young people to build the knowledge, skill sets and connections they need to capitalize on the fast-growing market for AI jobs and build a strong AI career.

https://www.mysanantonio.com/news/article/The-Sooner-You-Get-Your-First-AI-Job-the-Better-13065882.php

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College Opportunity at Risk

Sat, 2018-07-21 17:20

by Institute for Research in Higher Education, University of Pennsylvania

The College Opportunity Risk Assessment is the first state-by-state analytic tool to consider the breadth of the policy landscape that must be navigated to ensure future educational opportunity. All states face risks to college opportunity, but each state faces different types and levels of risk within their diverse economic and social realities. To guide state policy makers in mitigating these risks, we offer individual state risk assessments based on four interrelated risk categories—higher education performance, educational equity, public funding and productivity, and economic policies that influence public revenue and budgeting.

https://irhe.gse.upenn.edu/College-Opportunity-at-Risk

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Where work pays: How does where you live matter for your earnings?

Sat, 2018-07-21 17:15

by Lauren Bauer, Audrey Breitwieser, Ryan Nunn, and Jay Shambaugh; Brookings

Educational and occupational choices matter for your earnings, but where you work matters, too. Employment opportunities and wages in some occupations vary substantially from state to state, county to county, and city to city. One location might be a great place to earn a living as a nurse but not as a construction worker (e.g., New Orleans, Louisiana), while a different location might be the opposite (e.g., Utica, New York). Does it make sense for people starting or advancing their careers to move? And if it does, to where should they move?

Editor’s Note: An interactive tool accompanies this economic analysis, allowing users to see the distribution of annual earnings across the United States for a given occupation and age group, adjusting for cost of living and taxes.

Where work pays: How does where you live matter for your earnings?

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Enabling the future of online learning via human connection

Sat, 2018-07-21 17:12

by Education Technology (UK)

Online education has revolutionised the way students learn by giving learners autonomy over their learning. Nevertheless, the education community is becoming aware of its limitation: its dependency on students’ own motivation to continue studying. A new approach to online learning, therefore, has emerged in Japan to ensure the success of every student – online coaching.  There are three distinct roles coaches play. First, coaches generate an electronic learning record (ELR) for each student, based on the student’s dream, academic objectives, recent assessment results, extracurricular activities, time available to study and so on. The ELR includes a study plan, learner profile, and learning history. Besides assisting coaches to align learning objectives and expectations with learners, the ELR ensures continuous support of each student even if coaches change.

https://edtechnology.co.uk/Article/enabling-the-future-of-online-learning-via-human-connection

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Can We Design Online Learning Platforms That Feel More Intimate Than Massive?

Sat, 2018-07-21 17:10

by Giving Compass

Most of our energy has been focused on designing physical learning spaces, even as more teaching and learning shifts online. Unfortunately, most massive open online course (MOOC) platforms still feel like drafty lecture halls instead of intimate seminar rooms. The majority of online learning environments are no more than video-hosting platforms with quizzes and a discussion forum. These default features force online instructors to use a style of teaching that feels more like shouting to the masses than engaging in meaningful conversations.

https://givingcompass.org/article/can-we-design-online-learning-platforms-that-feel-more-intimate-than-massive/

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5 Amazing Student Success Stories from India

Sat, 2018-07-21 17:03

By Prachi Mishra, Udacity

Each of these 5 students earned a scholarship from Google and Udacity, and they’ve used their opportunities to achieve incredible things in their lives and their careers. Back in 2017, Google Scholarships launched in India with a mission to help 30,000 students pursue their dreams of venturing into mobile and web development. Today, so many exceptional students have earned new opportunities for themselves through the Udacity-Google Scholarship program. Their stories are amazing, and we share five of them with you here.

5 Amazing Student Success Stories from India

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EdX Survey Finds That about 1/3 of Americans Ages 25 – 44 Have Completely Changed Fields Since Starting Their First Job Post-College

Fri, 2018-07-20 17:25

by EdX

EdX.org has announced the results of a survey of 1,000 consumers ages 25 – 44 around trends related to career transformations. The survey found that 32 percent of respondents have considered making a career change at some point within the past year, and 29 percent of respondents have completely changed fields since starting their first job post college. The chief drivers of these continuous shifts are a desire for salary increase (39 percent) or interest in another field (21 percent). EdX commissioned the survey in order to further identify the types of challenges faced by learners, specifically as they look to change industries, in an effort to provide optimized access to quality, career-relevant education to all.  The workplace is changing more rapidly than ever before and employers are in need of highly-skilled talent. Faced with this ever-changing workplace, candidates seeking to change or advance their careers are tasked with gaining the knowledge and skills they need to succeed. In addition, many of these in-demand fields are so newly emerging that they do not map back to traditional fields of study — according to edX’s survey findings, only a fifth of respondents consider their education from their college major to be translatable to their current field.

https://www.businesswire.com/news/home/20180710005238/en/EdX-Survey-Finds-13-Americans-Ages-25

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