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Engineering Education
Updated: 20 hours 23 min ago

Creatively nudging faculty members to expand use of immersive technology

Fri, 2018-07-20 17:20

by James Paterson, Education dive
Colleges and universities find it isn’t easy to get faculty to use immersive technologies, but some are having success by introducing them to the new tools in creative ways. Campus Technology recently reviewed the efforts by some institutions to move educators toward using the new technology. Officials advocating for use of immersive technology at institutions point out several hurdles that are hindering its development – from tight budgets for these less-accepted teaching methods, to finding time to instruct professors how to use them. They have improved the response by introducing virtual reality or immersive experiences in casual settings to faculty members, by showing them examples of how it can be used and by proving its value by gathering data about its effectiveness in the classroom.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/creatively-nudging-faculty-members-to-expand-use-of-immersive-technology/527468/

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Making Learning Without Borders a Reality

Fri, 2018-07-20 17:15

by Tutaleni Asino and Phil Tietjen, Educause Review

One of our shared interests is using social networking technologies not only to build local learning communities but to expand those communities beyond our classrooms. On the surface, this sounds obvious since these tools are often associated with making connections and bringing students together regardless of time and place. However, what we found is somewhat paradoxical: While faculty members are usually interested in using social networking technologies to build learning communities within their specific classes, we saw far fewer instances of engagement in collaborative learning activities with classes from other universities. This suggests another kind of border that we educators could work more earnestly toward addressing. We set out to contribute to this effort by designing a small-scale collaborative project between two classes from our respective schools by using the video discussion tool Flipgrid.

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2018/6/making-learning-without-borders-a-reality

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Measuring Non-Degree Credential Attainment

Fri, 2018-07-20 17:10

BY JENNA LEVENTOFF, National Skills Coalition

The Workforce Data Quality Campaign (WDQC) has surveyed all fifty states, and the District of Columbia, to learn whether states are collecting individual-level data about non-degree credentials, incorporating that data into their SLDS, evaluating attainment by subpopulation, and identifying
credentials of value. This scan finds that no state has comprehensive data about all types of non-degree credentials. States are the most likely to have data about public for-credit certificate programs, registered apprenticeship certificates, and licenses. Thirty-six states report having most or all individual-level data on for-credit certificates from public two-year institutions in their state. Twenty-seven states report having most or all data about registered apprenticeship certificates, and twenty-two states report having most or all licensing data.

https://www.nationalskillscoalition.org/resources/publications/file/Measuring-Non-Degree-Credential-Attainment-50-State-Scan.pdf

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College Opportunity at Risk

Fri, 2018-07-20 17:02

by Institute for Research in Higher Education, University of Pennsylvania

The College Opportunity Risk Assessment is the first state-by-state analytic tool to consider the breadth of the policy landscape that must be navigated to ensure future educational opportunity. All states face risks to college opportunity, but each state faces different types and levels of risk within their diverse economic and social realities. To guide state policy makers in mitigating these risks, we offer individual state risk assessments based on four interrelated risk categories—higher education performance, educational equity, public funding and productivity, and economic policies that influence public revenue and budgeting.

https://irhe.gse.upenn.edu/College-Opportunity-at-Risk

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University of Iowa axes 7 centers due to reduced state funding

Fri, 2018-07-20 17:01

By James Paterson, Education Dive
The University of Iowa is closing seven centers and cutting funding to five more in the next year to save an estimated $3.6 million and to make up for revenue lost in state budget cuts. The move will eliminate 33 jobs, according to the Des Moines Register. The centers to be closed are dedicated to a variety of specialties, including workplace-related training, dentist recruitment, relations with China, farm safety and understanding the aging process. In the past decade, the University of Iowa, Iowa State University and the University of Northern Iowa have relied increasingly on tuition as their revenue source, raising 63% from students last year compared to 49% in 2008. State aid dropped 17% in that period to 32% of revenue for the three state public universities.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/university-of-iowa-axes-7-centers-due-to-reduced-state-funding/527590/

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Online STEM Courses Need More Real-World Interactivity

Thu, 2018-07-19 17:25

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
What do students want in the learning activities for their online STEM courses? They’d prefer more real-life problems to solve and instructional resources such as simulations, case studies, videos and demonstrations. They’d also like the chance to meet and collaborate with other students as well as teaching assistants online. Finally, they’d appreciate clear and consistent information from instructors about instructions, assignments, assessments, due dates, course pages and office hours. That’s what a research project found when it queried 537 students from 15 online STEM courses within a large, four-year public university in the southeast during spring 2016. A third of the students (36 percent) came from the college of engineering and computer science; other large groups included science majors (14 percent) and those pursuing degrees in the college of health and public affairs (11 percent). The study was done by three researchers from the Center for Distributed Learning at the University of Central Florida.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/07/09/online-stem-courses-need-more-real-world-interactivity.aspx

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Five Ways to Build Community in Online Classrooms

Thu, 2018-07-19 17:17

By: Melissa Wehler, Faculty Focus

I was still dealing with the real issues of isolation, fear, and frustration that results in students leaving their online courses. To combat these feelings, professors—myself included—have to deliberately, consistently, and relentlessly work to build student-faculty and student-student relationships in online courses. As educators, we know that building community in the online environment increases the likelihood of student success. Finding ways to concretize something as ephemeral as “a sense of belonging” can be difficult; however, here are five places where you can start.

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/five-ways-to-build-community-in-online-classrooms/

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Can We Design Online Learning Platforms That Feel More Intimate Than Massive?

Thu, 2018-07-19 17:16

By Amy Ahearn, EdSurge

Most of our energy has been focused on designing physical learning spaces, even as more teaching and learning shifts online. Unfortunately, most massive open online course (MOOC) platforms still feel like drafty lecture halls instead of intimate seminar rooms. The majority of online learning environments are no more than video-hosting platforms with quizzes and a discussion forum. These default features force online instructors to use a style of teaching that feels more like shouting to the masses than engaging in meaningful conversations. This presents a challenge and an opportunity: How can we design online learning environments that achieve scale and intimacy? How do we make digital platforms feel as inviting as well-designed physical classrooms?

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-09-can-we-design-online-learning-platforms-that-feel-more-intimate-than-massive

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Creatively nudging faculty members to expand use of immersive technology

Thu, 2018-07-19 17:10

by James Paterson, Education dive
Colleges and universities find it isn’t easy to get faculty to use immersive technologies, but some are having success by introducing them to the new tools in creative ways. Campus Technology recently reviewed the efforts by some institutions to move educators toward using the new technology. Officials advocating for use of immersive technology at institutions point out several hurdles that are hindering its development – from tight budgets for these less-accepted teaching methods, to finding time to instruct professors how to use them. They have improved the response by introducing virtual reality or immersive experiences in casual settings to faculty members, by showing them examples of how it can be used and by proving its value by gathering data about its effectiveness in the classroom.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/creatively-nudging-faculty-members-to-expand-use-of-immersive-technology/527468/

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Making Learning Without Borders a Reality

Thu, 2018-07-19 17:05

by Tutaleni Asino and Phil Tietjen, Educause Review

One of our shared interests is using social networking technologies not only to build local learning communities but to expand those communities beyond our classrooms. On the surface, this sounds obvious since these tools are often associated with making connections and bringing students together regardless of time and place. However, what we found is somewhat paradoxical: While faculty members are usually interested in using social networking technologies to build learning communities within their specific classes, we saw far fewer instances of engagement in collaborative learning activities with classes from other universities. This suggests another kind of border that we educators could work more earnestly toward addressing. We set out to contribute to this effort by designing a small-scale collaborative project between two classes from our respective schools by using the video discussion tool Flipgrid.

https://er.educause.edu/blogs/2018/6/making-learning-without-borders-a-reality

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Peer Evaluation as a Learning and Assessment Strategy at the School of Business at Simon Fraser University, British Columbia

Thu, 2018-07-19 17:03

by Teach Online Canada

The tool collects student feedback data and uses it to adjust the grades for the group assignments using the logical structure of team-based learning (TBL). In the peer evaluation assignment students assess their group members on teamwork dimensions that are pre-identified by the instructor for example, “preparation”, “contribution” and “collaboration.” Students evaluate each of their teammates on a Likert scale and provide written comments that surface practices which are perceived to help or hinder team performance. The final grades for group assignments are automatically adjusted by the feedback from the group members received through the peer evaluation assignment(s) using the team based learning logic. After screening by the instructor, each student receives an anonymized summary of qualitative comments from group members and the instructor receives a compiled report for the whole class. Finally, to close the loop, students write a short, graded reflection on what they have learned from the process of giving and receiving feedback.

https://teachonline.ca/pockets-innovation/peer-evaluation-learning-and-assessment-strategy-school-business-simon-fraser-university-british

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Hackers can purchase government login credentials for cheap on the dark web

Wed, 2018-07-18 17:25

by Kevin Parish, Digital Trends

Among the list of devices, services and networks on the menu are multiple government systems on sale worldwide, including those linked to the United States. The team found connections to a variety of healthcare institutions including medical equipment shops, hospitals, and more. They even found access to security and building automation systems at a major international airport selling for a mere $10. The problem doesn’t just revolve around desktops, laptops, and servers. Internet of Things devices based on Windows Embedded are also on the menu such as point-of-sale systems, kiosks, parking meters, thin client PCs and more. Many are overlooked and not updated, making them a quiet entryway for hackers.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/computing/mcafee-hackers-buy-remote-desktop-access-dark-web/

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A College Prices Its Online Programs 60% Less

Wed, 2018-07-18 17:20

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Berklee College of Music’s online program, priced at just over a third of tuition for the Massachusetts institution’s face-to-face degree offerings, raised eyebrows when it got off the ground in 2013. Conventional wisdom that online programs require more resources to produce had taken hold, and pricing models that favor online students were few and far between. Five years later, Berklee remains an anomaly in higher ed, as most institutions continue to charge the same or more for online programs as for their face-to-face equivalents. Some arguments hinge on a philosophical belief that online education should be valued equivalently to face-to-face programs, while others emphasize the significant financial burden of designing and launching online courses from scratch.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/11/berklee-college-music-defies-conventional-wisdom-low-price

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OPMs: Pitfalls and opportunities.

Wed, 2018-07-18 17:15

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

What do you think of the online program management (OPM) industry? If you are like many higher ed people that I speak with, your answer may not be all that positive. Higher ed people simply don’t like the idea of long contract lock-ins (usually between five and 10 years) and revenue share arrangements that send half to three-quarters of tuition dollars to for-profit companies. Is it possible to be a critical and clear-eyed observer of the OPM industry and still believe that an OPM partnership should be on the table as institutions consider new online programs? I think the answer is yes, as I’ve come to believe that (a) the OPM industry is more complicated and nuanced than we often think, and (b) we need to think about OPM partnerships in a different way.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/5-misconceptions-about-online-program-management

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Can We Design Online Learning Platforms That Feel More Intimate Than Massive?

Wed, 2018-07-18 17:10

By Amy Ahearn, EdSurge

Most of our energy has been focused on designing physical learning spaces, even as more teaching and learning shifts online. Unfortunately, most massive open online course (MOOC) platforms still feel like drafty lecture halls instead of intimate seminar rooms. The majority of online learning environments are no more than video-hosting platforms with quizzes and a discussion forum. These default features force online instructors to use a style of teaching that feels more like shouting to the masses than engaging in meaningful conversations. This presents a challenge and an opportunity: How can we design online learning environments that achieve scale and intimacy? How do we make digital platforms feel as inviting as well-designed physical classrooms?

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-07-09-can-we-design-online-learning-platforms-that-feel-more-intimate-than-massive

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A College Prices Its Online Programs 60% Less

Wed, 2018-07-18 17:05

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Berklee College of Music’s online program, priced at just over a third of tuition for the Massachusetts institution’s face-to-face degree offerings, raised eyebrows when it got off the ground in 2013. Conventional wisdom that online programs require more resources to produce had taken hold, and pricing models that favor online students were few and far between. Five years later, Berklee remains an anomaly in higher ed, as most institutions continue to charge the same or more for online programs as for their face-to-face equivalents. Some arguments hinge on a philosophical belief that online education should be valued equivalently to face-to-face programs, while others emphasize the significant financial burden of designing and launching online courses from scratch.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/11/berklee-college-music-defies-conventional-wisdom-low-price

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OPMs: Pitfalls and opportunities.

Wed, 2018-07-18 17:02

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

What do you think of the online program management (OPM) industry? If you are like many higher ed people that I speak with, your answer may not be all that positive. Higher ed people simply don’t like the idea of long contract lock-ins (usually between five and 10 years) and revenue share arrangements that send half to three-quarters of tuition dollars to for-profit companies. Is it possible to be a critical and clear-eyed observer of the OPM industry and still believe that an OPM partnership should be on the table as institutions consider new online programs? I think the answer is yes, as I’ve come to believe that (a) the OPM industry is more complicated and nuanced than we often think, and (b) we need to think about OPM partnerships in a different way.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/5-misconceptions-about-online-program-management

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How to start a virtual coding boot camp in five easy steps

Tue, 2018-07-17 17:27

BY MEREDITH HOOVER, eSchool News
We’re building a love for STEM with virtual robotics and coding camps that get students excited; here are 5 steps to get your school going in the right direction. It never ceases to amaze me when I see a middle school student excelling at virtual robot simulations, a seventh grader using computer code to solve a STEM problem, or an eighth-grade robotics team brainstorming ideas and then developing a full-blown operating robot. Even these tiniest victories go a long way, with students getting hands-on with advanced technologies and then taking that experience to college and/or out into the workforce.

How to start a virtual coding boot camp in five easy steps

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5 things every college must know about cloud computing

Tue, 2018-07-17 17:20

BY KEITH RAJECKI, eCampus News

Many universities have been relatively slow to embrace the cloud for a few simple reasons. First, because it’s not always cheap or easy to overhaul IT systems. And second, because cloud represents a fundamental technological change and perceived challenges that many organizations do not feel they have the expertise, bandwidth, or resources to address.

Fortunately, there are ways around these challenges, and it starts by remembering that cloud computing is part of a journey to a modern campus—not the ultimate destination. What’s needed is a strategic approach that combines on-premise services with advanced cloud solutions.

5 things every college must know about cloud computing

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Accreditor clears path for $1.9 billion Strayer-Capella merger

Tue, 2018-07-17 17:15

by Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive
The merger between Capella University’s parent company, Capella Education Company, and Strayer Education Inc., the parent company of Strayer University, has been approved by the Higher Learning Commission and is expected to close on or before Aug. 1. The resulting company will be named Strategic Education Inc., according to a July 9 Security Exchange Commission filing.  The $1.9 billion deal will create one of the largest for-profit companies in the country, serving roughly 80,000 students between them. The two institutions will continue to operate as “independent and separately accredited institutions.”  Strayer shareholders will own 52% of the combined stock and Capella shareholders will own 48%.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/accreditor-clears-path-for-19-billion-strayer-capella-merger/527421/

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