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Engineering Education
Updated: 12 hours 40 min ago

Data can improve both student outcomes and faculty performance

Fri, 2017-10-06 17:20

by Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive

 

In response to a realization that students weren’t performing well in class, Pierce College has collected data on course-completion for every instructor, allowing more than 95% of full time faculty to see how students from various backgrounds are performing in their classes over the last three years.  To get instructor buy-in to the data dashboards, Pierce administrators have been engaging in conversations with faculty on specific ways the data can be used to improve teaching — and as a result, the college has added dozens of dashboards to show what types of innovative instructional approaches have positive impacts, reports the Chronicle of Higher Education.  The institution has also invested in professional development around the data, offering a $2,000 increase in salary to faculty for using it — with the result of increasing salaries by more than $300,000 since 2012.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/data-can-improve-both-student-outcomes-and-faculty-performance/506421/

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How Blockchains Could Set IoT Free

Fri, 2017-10-06 17:16

By Joel Hans, RT Insights

By creating some standards by which to structure blockchain-based IoT deployment, consortiums like this one seek to lower the barrier of entry to those who want a secure, easily-deployable blockchain experience. The Trusted IoT Alliance aims to publish open source code under some coordinated standards and reference architecture that even non-members could take advantage of. And they already have a common API that allows them to register transactions on both Hyperledger and Ethereum blockchains.

https://www.rtinsights.com/how-blockchains-could-set-iot-free/

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New computer program to examine collaborative online learning

Fri, 2017-10-06 17:10

by Jim Carlson, Penn State
An effort to transform burgeoning online learning from being essentially individualistic to considerably more collaborative is gaining ground, according to a researcher who is breaking ground about the usefulness of online communities. Marcela Borge, assistant professor in learning, design and technology in Penn State’s College of Education, earned a National Science Foundation grant for her work on “Fostering Ecologies of Online Learning Through Technology Augmented Human Facilitation.” Borge said “Research in the learning sciences has shown that collaborative processes like discourse and collective sense-making are essential for learning. For this reason, we wanted to make sure that students who are learning in online contexts have equal access to meaningful learning experiences: collaborative learning, deep sense-making, building relationships with other students.”

http://news.psu.edu/story/485949/2017/10/03/research/new-computer-program-examine-collaborative-online-learning

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We Are Living in the Age of Online Learning

Fri, 2017-10-06 17:05

by Calvin Harper, Go Certify

Learning House queried 1,500 past, present, and prospective online college students about their demographics and reasons for pursuing an online education. Their responses show some interesting trends. For example, cost can lead to a reluctance to enroll in school, but it can be overcome with minor scholarship incentives, as little as $500 in most instances. What came as no surprise was the finding that the percentage of students pursuing online computer science and IT degrees has more than doubled since 2014, from 9 percent to more than 20 percent. Additionally, the average age of online students is really declining. In 2016 the average age was 29, down from 36 just two years ago. The main reason for the age drop is directly related to an increase in the number of younger students signing up for online courses. Since 2012, the number of online students in the 18-to-24-year-old demographic has more than doubled.

http://www.gocertify.com/articles/we-are-living-in-the-age-of-online-learning

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How Blockchains Could Set IoT Free

Fri, 2017-10-06 17:02

By Joel Hans, RT Insights

By creating some standards by which to structure blockchain-based IoT deployment, consortiums like this one seek to lower the barrier of entry to those who want a secure, easily-deployable blockchain experience. The Trusted IoT Alliance aims to publish open source code under some coordinated standards and reference architecture that even non-members could take advantage of. And they already have a common API that allows them to register transactions on both Hyperledger and Ethereum blockchains.

https://www.rtinsights.com/how-blockchains-could-set-iot-free/

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Classes begin for Lone Star College-Kingwood students after flood damages

Mon, 2017-10-02 17:25

By Beth Marshall, Community Impact Houston

Sustaining the most damage of all Lone Star College System campuses, LSC-Kingwood took on water in six of its nine buildings, and officials have worked to convert nearly 600 face-to-face courses to online or hybrid formats. “While the hurricane damaged our buildings, it did not shake our determination to get students educated,” said LSC-Kingwood President Katherine Persson. “Campus personnel pulled together to ensure that students were able to register, pay, and attend classes by Sept. 25.” As of Sept. 22, LSC-Kingwood had a seven percent increase in student enrollment, according to a release from the college. More than 13,000 students are taking online classes and in-person and hybrid courses are being held in the Student Conference Center and the Music Instructional Building on campus.

https://communityimpact.com/houston/lake-houston-humble-kingwood/education/2017/09/25/classes-begin-lsc-kingwood-students-today-flood-damages/

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Teacher Leadership in Online Classrooms Shapes Communication

Mon, 2017-10-02 17:20

By Allison Mills, Michigan Tech University

In a paper published in the Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, STEM education researcher Joshua Ellis shows how empowering teachers in online professional development classes can deepen their learning. The effects can then carry over into their own classrooms. “My background is in designing online learning environments, and we know that you always want to design for the outcome—but we don’t always know how to design for the outcome,” says Ellis, who is an assistant professor in the Department of Cognitive and Learning Sciences at Michigan Technological University. “The study spurred conversations for us as designers because, at the end of the day, we have to ask, would we do this again?”

http://www.mtu.edu/news/stories/2017/september/teacher-leadership-online-classrooms-shapes-communication.html

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Online courses, initially slow to boot, now dominate some curricula

Mon, 2017-10-02 17:15

By Mike Malloy, World-Herald

Back in the era of dial-up Internet and floppy discs, Mary Hawkins helped guide Bellevue University into the then mostly uncharted world of online education. It was 1996. Hawkins, who was less than a year into her tenure as university president, established Bellevue’s first online offering – an undergraduate management class. Unsure where to cap enrollment, Hawkins set the class limit at 1,000. “We got eight,” she said. Not 8,000 students. Eight students. Professors also were slow to boot up. “We were literally telling people to unpack the box the computer came in,” Hawkins said. Today, Bellevue has 9,176 online students, who log in from 130 countries to pursue 80 different degrees.

http://www.omaha.com/special_sections/college-careers/online-courses-initially-slow-to-boot-now-dominate-some-curricula/article_88135ae8-b398-5d6c-9236-be0c62378d52.html

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Professors Have Taken Over the MOOCs

Mon, 2017-10-02 17:06

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

We need to revise our thinking about MOOCs. The old story was that MOOCs are just another overhyped educational technology, one more example of interests outside of the academy (investors, technologists) seeking to “disrupt college” without any true understanding of how higher education actually works.
The new MOOC story may be about the professors. This is a narrative of energy and enthusiasm to create and teach open online courses that is coming from the professors themselves, as opposed to the institutions in which they work.
Professors, it turns out, love what they teach about and research.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/professors-have-taken-over-moocs

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Ad-hoc Informal Learning Opportunities for Continuing Professional Development

Mon, 2017-10-02 17:05

By Ben Henderson, eLearning Inside

Measuring CPD has always been tricky calculation.  A two hour session on ‘teamwork’ for example, could easily be less effective than a sub-10 minute YouTube video viewed on the train to the office. One of these activities will potentially be recorded as CPD, and the other barely mentioned.  As a professional, you have ownership of your development on an intrinsic level. You are the only one who knows if a given piece of training or advice has provided value and support to your career development, and that is something which is difficult to measure in an objective sense.  If you would like to track your own CPD, then take a look at Experience API which is a new specification for online learning that makes it easier to collect information about the wide range of professional development experiences an individual has both online and offline.

https://news.elearninginside.com/ad-hoc-informal-learning-opportunities-continuing-professional-development/

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Online courses, initially slow to boot, now dominate some curricula

Mon, 2017-10-02 17:03

By Mike Malloy, World-Herald

Back in the era of dial-up Internet and floppy discs, Mary Hawkins helped guide Bellevue University into the then mostly uncharted world of online education. It was 1996. Hawkins, who was less than a year into her tenure as university president, established Bellevue’s first online offering – an undergraduate management class. Unsure where to cap enrollment, Hawkins set the class limit at 1,000. “We got eight,” she said. Not 8,000 students. Eight students. Professors also were slow to boot up. “We were literally telling people to unpack the box the computer came in,” Hawkins said. Today, Bellevue has 9,176 online students, who log in from 130 countries to pursue 80 different degrees.

http://www.omaha.com/special_sections/college-careers/online-courses-initially-slow-to-boot-now-dominate-some-curricula/article_88135ae8-b398-5d6c-9236-be0c62378d52.html

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Wearables to See Double-Digit Growth through 2021

Sun, 2017-10-01 17:26

By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal
Sales of wearable devices will post double-digit gains each year through 2021, according to a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC).  Vendors will sell 121.7 million devices this year, according to the forecast, up 16.6 percent over last year’s 104.4 million shipments. By 2021, the company predicts total sales to reach 229.5 million units on the strength of a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17.2 percent. Wrist-worn devices will drive the market, according to the company, while “lesser-known wearable products, such as clothing and ear-wear, will experience market-beating growth in the years to come.”

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/09/15/wearables-to-see-double-digit-growth-through-2021.aspx

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Minecraft: Education Edition Reboots The Oregon Trail

Sun, 2017-10-01 17:20

By Sri Ravipati, THE Journal

Since its debut last year, educators and students in 115 countries are currently using Minecraft: Education Edition. Starting today, classrooms will be able to play a popular educational game from the past within Minecraft’s sandbox world.  Microsoft has launched The Oregon Trail Experience, which focuses on subjects in STEM, humanities and fine arts. The company partnered with Houghton Mifflin Harcourt to bring back The Oregon Trail, a computer game first introduced in 1971 to teach students about frontier life by putting them in the role of a 19th century pioneer.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/09/18/minecraft-education-edition-reboots-the-oregon-trail.aspx

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ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE: ARE COMPUTERS TAKING OVER FOR TEACHERS?

Sun, 2017-10-01 17:16

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

If you’re an educator, you’ve probably noticed that the profession has undergone significant change in the last few years. With the growth of the flipped classroom model and the plethora of resources available via apps and websites, teachers are no longer considered the experts. They are moving into the role of facilitator, “guide on the side” instead of “sage on the stage.” Are we headed to a brave new world in which teachers are replaced by giant computer screens and a tech coach to assist on the sidelines? The answer is…yes and no.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/artificial-intelligence-computers-taking-teachers/

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Ask 5 Financial Questions When Choosing an Online Degree

Sun, 2017-10-01 17:06

By Marian Stoltz-Loike, US News

Whether you have decided to pursue an online degree for a new job or to advance in your current role, paying for your education can be a major hurdle.  Financing your online education can seem daunting, but by looking into available grants and loans and how payment works, you can make educated choices and determine how to get the most value for your money. Linked below are five key financial questions to ask as you research different options.

https://www.usnews.com/education/online-learning-lessons/articles/2017-09-22/ask-5-financial-questions-when-picking-an-online-degree-program

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Students are opting out of purchasing textbooks because of cost — how OERs fit in

Sun, 2017-10-01 17:02

by Pat Donachie, Education Dive

About 85% of new college or university students had not purchased college textbooks by the first day of class or decided not to buy the textbooks at all, according to a new survey of students conducted by Wakefield Research on behalf of VitalSource Technologies LLC. This was a 5% jump from a similar survey the year before. About 91% of students who did not purchase the materials cited costs as the issue, and half of those students admitted that their grades went down because they did not have the necessary materials. Students also cited an interest in “inclusive access,” which involves incorporating the cost of digital classroom materials into the cost of tuition. 88% of students believed that incorporating inclusive access would help their grades improve, in lieu of using traditional print resources and textbooks. 78% of students whose schools did not have such an initiative underway expressed hope their school would investigate bringing inclusive access to their campus.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/students-are-opting-out-of-purchasing-textbooks-because-of-cost-how-oers/505242/

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Wearables to See Double-Digit Growth through 2021

Sun, 2017-10-01 17:01

By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal
Sales of wearable devices will post double-digit gains each year through 2021, according to a new forecast from International Data Corp. (IDC).  Vendors will sell 121.7 million devices this year, according to the forecast, up 16.6 percent over last year’s 104.4 million shipments. By 2021, the company predicts total sales to reach 229.5 million units on the strength of a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17.2 percent. Wrist-worn devices will drive the market, according to the company, while “lesser-known wearable products, such as clothing and ear-wear, will experience market-beating growth in the years to come.”

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/09/15/wearables-to-see-double-digit-growth-through-2021.aspx

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Science Competition Promotes K-12 Science Standards and Innovation

Fri, 2017-09-29 17:25

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal
An “assistance rod” that acts as a “rescue pack” for baby sea turtles. An improved cochlear implant that allows its wearer to hear a wider range of frequencies. An environmentally-friendly food wrap that will change color when the food inside has spoiled or been contaminated. Those are some of the winning student entries from previous “ExploraVision” science competitions. This year’s event will be open for registration from K-12 students until Feb. 8, 2018. The ExploraVision program is put on by the National Science Teachers Association and Toshiba with a goal of encouraging students to learn more about STEM-related subjects.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2017/09/21/science-competition-promotes-k12-science-standards-and-innovation.aspx

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Future-Proofing College by Embracing ‘Purpose Learning’

Fri, 2017-09-29 17:20

By Michelle R. Weise, EdSurge

How can we help students chart a course for themselves and prepare them for the careers and gigs of an AI world? If we wish to meet the rapidly-changing demands of the workforce of the future, we first have to acknowledge that the educational pathways of the future might very well involve skills-based learning that does not necessarily add up to four years, or even a degree. We will have to embrace new and alternative postsecondary educational models, even if they make us feel uncomfortable at first.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-09-21-future-proofing-college-by-embracing-purpose-learning

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You can now take an online course to learn how to build a flying or self-driving car

Fri, 2017-09-29 17:14

by Karen Hao, Quartz

Udacity revealed two new programs in flying and self-driving cars. “Intro to Self-Driving Cars” promises to teach students “the essentials of building a self-driving car” over four months for 10 hours per week. Designed for people with minimal coding experience, the course introduces students to the basic engineering challenges of self-driving cars (there’s also a more advanced “Self-Driving Car Engineer” bootcamp.) Udacity has partnered with Lyft to offer 400 scholarships to underrepresented minorities in tech for the $800 class. The two-term “Flying Car” program, which will open early 2018, brings together aerospace professors from MIT, ETH Zurich, and the University of Toronto. Despite the ambitious name, the curriculum focuses largely on quadrotors and fixed-wing drones, which are used to introduce software skills and basic concepts that might eventually power the flying cars of the future.

https://qz.com/1082609/online-learning-platform-udacity-will-offer-nanodegree-programs-in-flying-and-self-driving-cars/

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