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Engineering Education
Updated: 19 hours 42 min ago

Technology is key to reducing college education costs

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:21

by Brian Mulligan, the Irish Times

In 20 years’ time, fewer school leavers will go to college. Far more study options will be available, many on the internet – and much cheaper than what is offered now. Distance learning and work-based learning, including apprenticeships, will become more available, reducing the total cost of education by allowing school leavers to live at home and “earn while they learn”.

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/education/technology-is-key-to-reducing-college-education-costs-1.3045100

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The 7 Deadly Sins of Online Learning (And 7 Ways to Repent)

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:21

By Sydney Johnson, EdSurge

Education technology is riddled with temptations and false promises. But if you ask Mark Brown, a professor and director of the National Institute for Digital Learning at Dublin City University in Ireland, problems such as falling for hype around new technology is an absolute moral dilemma. He’s caved in before. “I have a personal confession,” Brown admitted in his keynote address at OLC Innovate happening this week in New Orleans. “I am a very big sinner.” Yet like any confessional, Brown also offered ways to repent from what he called “the seven deadly sins of online learning.” Feeling a bit guilty ourselves (and perhaps inspired by the home of the Saints), we caught up with Brown afterwards for some advice on ways to return to the righteous path.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-04-06-the-7-deadly-sins-of-online-learning-and-7-ways-to-repent

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Survey: To get more women in STEM, hire more female faculty

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:16

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

A recent CDW survey of 300 college women that examined both those majoring in STEM and those who left their STEM major suggests a lack of female role models, including instructors, in these fields is a primary deterrent to their pursuit. Among the survey’s findings are that 63% of female STEM majors question their abilities, close to 50% say their gender resulted in harder experiences, and 20% aren’t sure they’ll remain in STEM majors through graduation, Ed Tech: Focus on Higher Ed reports. Along with providing more female role models, researchers say the image of scientists, engineers and others in STEM fields needs to be broadened beyond negative stereotypes like that of the male “Dungeons and Dragons” nerd.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/women-stem-female-faculty-role-models/439955/

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Online and Digital Education: Enhancing Access to Higher Education in the 21st Century

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:14

by Vistasp Karbhari, The EvoLLLution

The barriers to extending access to higher education are lower than ever with the vast and rapid evolution of online education opportunities, but it’s up to institutions to adopt these offerings and create new pathways to postsecondary credentials.The 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act is often considered the landmark in the democratization of higher education, assuring postsecondary access to more than the privileged few and ensuring, simultaneously, the education of scholars and the training of a highly skilled workforce. Over 150 years later we need to re-envision the implementation of the concepts put forward through the grand purpose of that step and the series of Acts that followed (Hatch Act of 1887, Morrill Act of 1890, Smith-Lever Act of 1914) in light of today’s technology and needs.

http://evolllution.com/revenue-streams/distance_online_learning/online-and-digital-education-enhancing-access-to-higher-education-in-the-21st-century/

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Report: This kind of student is most likely to enroll in CBE

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:10

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

Though more research is needed, CBE programs are emerging as viable paths for many students. Although students in CBE programs are generally characterized as being older with work experience under their belts, it’s often hard to identify the true characteristics of these students because they are lumped in with the rest of the student body in their respective institutions. New research summarized in a report indicates that CBE programs can reduce costs for students who are progressing toward a degree, although traditional models might be better for low-income students who aren’t taking as many courses per year.

http://www.ecampusnews.com/alternative-pathways/characteristics-cbe-students/

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Computing Devices to Remain Stagnant as Traditional PCs Slide Ever Downward

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:04

By David Nagel, Campus Technology

Worldwide, enthusiasm for new computing devices seems to be tapering off. According to a new report from market research firm Gartner, overall device shipments will remain flat in 2017, even as traditional PCs (including laptops) go into a decline that’s forecast to last at least through 2019. According to Gartner, in 2016, 50 million ultramobile premium devices shipped. In 2017, that will climb to 60 million, followed by 72 million in 2018 and 82 million in 2019. Traditional PCs, including laptops, meanwhile, will crumble from 220 million devices in 2016 to 205 million this year, then drop down to 196 million in 2018 and 191 million in 2019.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/06/computing-devices-to-remain-stagnant-as-traditional-pcs-slide-ever-downward.aspx

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Guide to Open Educational Resources

Mon, 2017-04-17 17:03

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

The idea that knowledge, resources, and information should be widely available and also free might be a slightly newer concept. Before the advancement of the internet and today’s technology, the idea of access to free information, teaching resources, and even online books was unheard of. If you wanted to learn about a topic, you could pay for the materials and or books to learn about your topic of interest. If you want to teach about a specific area, you needed to develop the materials yourself or pay for them. Many educators now believe that teaching materials and other information should be free. As we begin to share our resources as copyright free materials, we also open the idea globally that teaching, learning, and research materials should be accessible to everyone. Edutopia notes that open educational resources can also save teachers significant time, planning, energy, and resources.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/ultimate-guide-using-open-educational-resources/

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Using Robotics to Prepare Students for the Future

Sun, 2017-04-16 17:25

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

In today’s’ technology-driven world, it’s important now more than ever to prepare students for the future. Teaching robotics to young students throughout their schooling can increase their ability to be creative and innovative thinkers and more productive members of society. By teaching our students the basics of robotics, we can open a whole new world to them and exciting opportunities that they wouldn’t have access to otherwise. Industries such as the drone industry have grown dramatically and rapidly in the last couple of years. The Economist has reported that more than 15,000 drones are being sold in the US every month. Growing industries such as these are going to need people who can come up with new and innovative ideas, and be equipped with the knowledge to design and create the technology needed.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/using-robotics-prepare-students-future/

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What is Mobile Learning?

Sun, 2017-04-16 17:20

by Megan Poore, Tomorrow’s Professor

Sometimes referred to simply as ‘mlearning’, mobile learning can be described as ‘anywhere, anytime’ learning that is not fixed in time (by schedule) or space (by location) and that is supported by digital technologies. Put differently, it is learning that is relevant to the context and location of the student. Mobile learning has two main elements: (1) the learner, and (2) a portable digital device (or devices) through which he or she accesses content. Such devices include mobile phones (both ‘smart’ and ‘dumb’), digital cameras, voice recorders, tablet devices (such as iPads), laptops and netbooks, video cameras, and MP3 players. Portable digital devices can support a variety of files and functions, including audio, video, and text files, and recording, wireless internet, news content, feeds, email, social media and other apps, and GPS and geolocation – all of which can be used for ‘learning on the go’. Internet connectivity is not essential for mobile learning although such connectivity is fast becoming the norm. Nevertheless, much effective mobile learning can still be achieved with devices that simply record or ‘play back’ content and information.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1556

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Clicking Your Way to Flipping Your Class

Sun, 2017-04-16 17:15

by Quentin Vicens*, Tomorrow’s Teaching and Learning

‘Flipping the classroom’ has become a popular endeavour among faculty and instructors¹, ²– it’s a refreshing and most welcome way to change the way we teach. In the process of flipping a class, especially for the first time, ‘clicker’-based peer instruction represents a powerful solution to engaging students in order to promote learning. Why does flipping a class make sense? In a nutshell: students don’t need an instructor to access content and ‘go through the book chapters’, especially when the internet is available 24/7 – but they do need an instructor to help them digest, process, criticize, and know how to apply that information. From a ‘sage on the stage’ in the traditional lecture, the instructor turns into a ‘guide on the side’, whose job is not merely to deliver complicated matter but to promote learning and ensure mastery of key concepts.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1557

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UK UNIVERSITIES ARE GOING ONLINE TO BEAT BREXIT

Sun, 2017-04-16 17:07

by Management Today

Higher education’s dual dilemma of Brexit and a squeeze on student visas is proving a catalyst for innovation in an otherwise conservative sector, says the founder of EdTech start-up Keypath. Under pressure to curb migration, and despite the concerns of industry and universities, the government has been reluctant to remove international students from the official migration statistics or loosen visa rules that put some of the world’s best and brightest students off studying here. Brexit too, with a 9% decline in EU student numbers over the past six months alone, is adding further pressure on our global standing. In response to some of these challenges, UK universities are accelerating their investment in online degrees. Whilst we must continue to address falling numbers of international students arriving on campus, the growth of high-quality digital degrees presents an enormous opportunity for businesses in the UK and for individuals looking to work, earn and learn.

http://www.managementtoday.co.uk/uk-universities-going-online-beat-brexit/future-business/article/1429896

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The 7 Deadly Sins of Online Learning (And 7 Ways to Repent)

Sun, 2017-04-16 17:05

By Sydney Johnson, EdSurge

Education technology is riddled with temptations and false promises. But if you ask Mark Brown, a professor and director of the National Institute for Digital Learning at Dublin City University in Ireland, problems such as falling for hype around new technology is an absolute moral dilemma. He’s caved in before. “I have a personal confession,” Brown admitted in his keynote address at OLC Innovate happening this week in New Orleans. “I am a very big sinner.” Yet like any confessional, Brown also offered ways to repent from what he called “the seven deadly sins of online learning.” Feeling a bit guilty ourselves (and perhaps inspired by the home of the Saints), we caught up with Brown afterwards for some advice on ways to return to the righteous path.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2017-04-06-the-7-deadly-sins-of-online-learning-and-7-ways-to-repent

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Thinking Small About Online Learning

Sun, 2017-04-16 17:03

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Online programs can be a vehicle to highlight differentiation. What school, department, program, or area of research does your school do better than anybody else?What degree programs are you most proud? What areas of teaching and knowledge creation have you build a critical mass of faculty? Building online programs around your strengths is a way not to compete with the Liberty’s, WGU’s, and SNHU’s of the world. My advice is that you don’t want to compete with these schools anyway. They have figured out the efficiencies around scale. Competing against the recruitment and student services and course development and instructional engines that they have built is a losing proposition. So do something different. The economics of online education mean that it is possible to build a very small program that is financially sustainable. If the focus is institutional differentiation and program quality – economic sustainability should be enough.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/thinking-small-about-online-learning

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Higher ed still lagging on digital accessibility

Sat, 2017-04-15 17:25

by Roger Riddell, Education Dive

Higher ed institutions are behind in ensuring accessibility for all students with digital material and platforms, as detailed by a new 3PlayMedia whitepaper. According to eCampus News, 11% of students have disabilities, but the shift to digital has left them in a particular bind as multimedia materials have expanded faster than accessibility initiatives designed to comply with federal and state laws. When working to establish accessibility for all students, institutions should consider compliance across hardware, software, digital text documents, web design, audio and video, and course design.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/higher-education-digital-accessibility-special-needs-disabilities/439847/

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GOP Rep. Kevin McCarthy introduces bill to provide free high-tech courses to vets

Sat, 2017-04-15 17:23

by Donovan Slack , USA TODAY

House Republican Majority Leader Rep. Kevin McCarthy says veterans need more educational opportunities that meet the demands of the fast-paced technology industry. The California lawmaker is introducing legislation Thursday giving the Department of Veterans Affairs $75 million to start a pilot program to provide accelerated computer courses in everything from robotics and basic programming to artificial intelligence and virtual reality. McCarthy, who is second-in-command to the House speaker, said the GI bill doesn’t cover many such courses and the VA approval process for changing curriculums or course offerings creates bureaucratic delays that are not conducive to the quickly changing technology fields. Under his proposal, veterans, instead of going to a traditional college — or in addition to a traditional degree — could get a shorter-term nano degree or micro credential.

https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2017/04/05/kevin-mccarthy-wants-va-provide-free-high-tech-courses-vets/100096868/

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3 Keys to Introducing Virtual Reality in E-Learning Courses

Sat, 2017-04-15 17:15

By Richard Chang, Campus Technology

Virtual reality (VR) has found its way into the educational space, and by all indications, it’s here to stay. Since VR glasses can be obtained for as low as $10 apiece, cost is becoming less of an issue, although the expensive headsets are still out of reach for many. Nonetheless, the actual applications beyond the “wow, cool” factor are still being explored. Here are three guidelines toward introducing VR in e-learning courses, according to the website E-Learning Industry.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/05/3-keys-to-introducing-vr-in-elearning-courses.aspx

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How Threats to Indirect Research Payments Could Make Universities Less Willing to Gamble on Science

Sat, 2017-04-15 17:09

By Paul Basken, Chronicle of Higher Ed

Last week the Trump administration made clear that its proposal to cut billions of dollars in research spending involved entirely eliminating the payments that universities use to help pay for those science buildings. The payments are known as indirect cost reimbursements. After an agency such as the National Institutes of Health and the National Science Foundation awards a grant for a research project, it tacks on an additional amount to cover administrative and facility costs at the university performing the work.

http://www.chronicle.com/article/How-Threats-to-Indirect/239736

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Online and Digital Education: Enhancing Access to Higher Education in the 21st Century

Sat, 2017-04-15 17:05

by Vistasp Karbhari, The EvoLLLution

The barriers to extending access to higher education are lower than ever with the vast and rapid evolution of online education opportunities, but it’s up to institutions to adopt these offerings and create new pathways to postsecondary credentials.The 1862 Morrill Land Grant Act is often considered the landmark in the democratization of higher education, assuring postsecondary access to more than the privileged few and ensuring, simultaneously, the education of scholars and the training of a highly skilled workforce. Over 150 years later we need to re-envision the implementation of the concepts put forward through the grand purpose of that step and the series of Acts that followed (Hatch Act of 1887, Morrill Act of 1890, Smith-Lever Act of 1914) in light of today’s technology and needs.

http://evolllution.com/revenue-streams/distance_online_learning/online-and-digital-education-enhancing-access-to-higher-education-in-the-21st-century/

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What is Mobile Learning?

Sat, 2017-04-15 17:03

by Megan Poore, Tomorrow’s Professor

Sometimes referred to simply as ‘mlearning’, mobile learning can be described as ‘anywhere, anytime’ learning that is not fixed in time (by schedule) or space (by location) and that is supported by digital technologies. Put differently, it is learning that is relevant to the context and location of the student. Mobile learning has two main elements: (1) the learner, and (2) a portable digital device (or devices) through which he or she accesses content. Such devices include mobile phones (both ‘smart’ and ‘dumb’), digital cameras, voice recorders, tablet devices (such as iPads), laptops and netbooks, video cameras, and MP3 players. Portable digital devices can support a variety of files and functions, including audio, video, and text files, and recording, wireless internet, news content, feeds, email, social media and other apps, and GPS and geolocation – all of which can be used for ‘learning on the go’. Internet connectivity is not essential for mobile learning although such connectivity is fast becoming the norm. Nevertheless, much effective mobile learning can still be achieved with devices that simply record or ‘play back’ content and information.

https://tomprof.stanford.edu/posting/1556

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Report: AI and IoT to Change Academic and Research Libraries in Years to Come

Fri, 2017-04-14 17:25

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

In the next year or two, research data management and the valuing of the user experience will drive technology adoption in research and academic libraries. The growth of research reports through online library databases is making it easier for students, faculty and researchers to access and build upon existing ideas and work. But as libraries adopt new data formats, they must also prepare for new methods of data curation involving “cutting-edge technology.” Libraries are also tapping usability principles in their digital and physical spaces to improve the quality of patrons’ interactions by making them more efficient and personalized.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2017/04/05/report-ai-and-iot-to-change-academic-and-research-libraries-in-years-to-come.aspx

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