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Engineering Education
Updated: 20 hours 28 min ago

The Student Debt Crisis: Could It Slow the U.S. Economy?

Tue, 2018-10-30 17:16

by Knowledge@Wharton

Student debt has more than tripled since 2004, reaching $1.52 trillion in the first quarter of 2018, according to the Federal Reserve — second only to mortgage debt in the U.S. College costs have outpaced the Consumer Price Index more than four-fold since 1985, and tuition assistance today is often harder to come by, particularly at schools without large endowments. As for the effect on the economy in general, Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said in March that slowed growth isn’t showing up in the data yet. But, he warned: “As this goes on and as student loans continue to grow and become larger and larger, then it absolutely could hold back growth.”

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/student-loan-debt-crisis/

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How Do You Prepare Students for Jobs That Don’t Exist Yet? Karen Cator Has Some Ideas.

Tue, 2018-10-30 17:10

By Emily Tate, EdSurge

There is a lot of talk these days about robots replacing humans in the workforce, but those conversations remain largely abstract. For students in school today, however, the issue is urgent, research shows. What if the job they aspire to today is no longer an option when it comes time to graduate? How can they train for jobs that don’t even exist yet? On the other side of that equation are educators, who often draw from their own learning experiences in K-12 and higher education to inform their instruction. What responsibility do they have in preparing today’s students for a future none of them can really envision? EdSurge recently sat down with Karen Cator, the CEO of Digital Promise, to get her take.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-23-how-do-you-prepare-students-for-jobs-that-don-t-exist-yet-karen-cator-has-some-ideas

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Google to offer on-campus machine learning classes

Tue, 2018-10-30 17:06

James Paterson, Education Dive
Google is headed to college campuses next year to teach a 10-week intensive course on machine learning, a fast-growing field for which the tech firm says there are neither enough workers nor faculty to train them, and where the firm is among the top employers. The course is part of Google’s Applied Computing Series, which includes two introductory computer and data science courses currently offered through eight colleges. It is seeking host colleges that don’t have a computer science program or whose program is at capacity. The machine-learning intensive will be offered at five colleges beginning in 2019. Google will pay tuition and offer instructors alongside faculty from the host college. Participants will earn nine credits from the host institution for successfully completing the course.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/google-to-offer-on-campus-machine-learning-classes/540436/

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100,000 people take humanitarian learning courses to save more lives in disaster situations

Tue, 2018-10-30 17:02

Humanitarian Leadership Academy
The Humanitarian Leadership Academy (the Academy) has released today (23 October 2018) an analysis of the learners and courses undertaken since its inception in November 2015. The report ‘100,000 humanitarian learners and counting’ shows that over 100,000 learners have accessed learning through the Academy’s free online learning platform Kaya, and other methods including face to face training, workshops and webinars in less than three years.  The Academy’s mission is to enable people around the world to prepare for and respond to crises in their own countries. This investment in learning and knowledge supports the commitments made at the World Humanitarian Summit for the localisation of aid to ensure a more efficient, effective and sustainable approach.

https://reliefweb.int/report/world/100000-people-take-humanitarian-learning-courses-save-more-lives-disaster-situations

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Empowering the Faculty in Debates Over Managing Online Programs

Mon, 2018-10-29 17:25

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

A new tool kit from the AAUP offers faculty groups concrete steps for ensuring that partnerships with for-profit companies don’t threaten academic freedom and program integrity. The association’s materials, released Monday, don’t explicitly make the case that faculty members should seek to block deals with OPMs or other for-profit companies like learning management system providers. But they aim to even the playing field of contentious negotiations between for-profit companies and the complex network of shared governance on the institutional side.  Vickie Cook, executive director of the Center for Online Learning, Research and Service at the University of Illinois at Springfield, said she thinks the tool kit is “impressive” and understands that some institutions see value in partnering with an OPM. But she remains skeptical that such a partnership would be worth the potential headaches.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/10/24/aaup-seeks-arm-faculty-members-tools-negotiations-over-managing

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10 Amazing Hackathon Ideas

Mon, 2018-10-29 17:20

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

You have probably heard the term “hackathon,” but you may not be sure of what it means. A hackathon is most commonly associated with hackers or computer programmers. However, while hacking typically involves computers, hackathons are primarily events where groups of people gather to “hack” an idea. At these major events, people come together to take an idea and turn it into something real using technology. As schools are focusing on STEM education, it is only natural for educators to consider adding hackathons to their lesson plans. Why? In addition to encouraging creativity, critical thinking, and collaboration, hackathons are fun! Students will learn how to take an idea and bring it to reality in a competitive (but collaborative) atmosphere.

10 Amazing Hackathon Ideas

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Adaptive Learning: A Stabilizing Influence Across Disciplines and Universities

Mon, 2018-10-29 17:15

Charles Dziuban, Colm Howlin, Patsy Moskal, Connie Johnson, Liza Parker, Maria Campbell; Online Learning

This study represents an adaptive learning partnership among The University of Central Florida, Colorado Technical University, and the platform provider Realizeit. A thirteen-variable learning domain for students forms the basis of a component invariance study. The results show that four dimensions: knowledge acquisition, engagement activities, communication and growth remain constant in nursing and mathematics courses across the two universities, indicating that the adaptive modality stabilizes learning organization in multiple disciplines. The authors contend that similar collaborative partnerships among universities and vendors is an important next step in the research process.

https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj/article/view/1465

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Google Enters the Fray

Mon, 2018-10-29 17:10

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

The company is offering its computer science curriculum — and kicking in some funds — to 10 institutions this academic year, with more to follow. A pilot program for computer science and data science courses is underway this fall at eight institutions, which have begun offering at least one of two introductory computer science and data science courses geared toward students with little to no experience in the disciplines. The program will expand next year as three of the eight institutions, as well as two others, offer an intensive 10-week machine learning seminar, with enrollment open to students across the country. This initiative is separate from Google’s new online certificate program in entry-level IT, which more than 25 community colleges and Northeastern University are offering for credit.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/10/24/google-computer-science-partnership-brings-companys-curriculum

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The Student Debt Crisis: Could It Slow the U.S. Economy?

Mon, 2018-10-29 17:05

by Knowledge@Wharton

Student debt has more than tripled since 2004, reaching $1.52 trillion in the first quarter of 2018, according to the Federal Reserve — second only to mortgage debt in the U.S. College costs have outpaced the Consumer Price Index more than four-fold since 1985, and tuition assistance today is often harder to come by, particularly at schools without large endowments. As for the effect on the economy in general, Federal Reserve chairman Jerome Powell said in March that slowed growth isn’t showing up in the data yet. But, he warned: “As this goes on and as student loans continue to grow and become larger and larger, then it absolutely could hold back growth.”

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/student-loan-debt-crisis/

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Empowering the Faculty in Debates Over Managing Online Programs

Mon, 2018-10-29 17:02

By Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

A new tool kit from the AAUP offers faculty groups concrete steps for ensuring that partnerships with for-profit companies don’t threaten academic freedom and program integrity. The association’s materials, released Monday, don’t explicitly make the case that faculty members should seek to block deals with OPMs or other for-profit companies like learning management system providers. But they aim to even the playing field of contentious negotiations between for-profit companies and the complex network of shared governance on the institutional side.  Vickie Cook, executive director of the Center for Online Learning, Research and Service at the University of Illinois at Springfield, said she thinks the tool kit is “impressive” and understands that some institutions see value in partnering with an OPM. But she remains skeptical that such a partnership would be worth the potential headaches.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/10/24/aaup-seeks-arm-faculty-members-tools-negotiations-over-managing

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The role of AI in education and the changing U.S. workforce

Sun, 2018-10-28 17:27

Elizabeth Mann LevesqueThursday, Brookings

The types of jobs that are at the least risk of being replaced by automation involve problem solving, teamwork, critical thinking, communication, and creativity.[2] The education profession is unlikely to see a dramatic drop in demand for employees given the nature of work in this field. Rather, preparing students for the changing labor market will likely be a central challenge for schools and educators. Policymakers and practitioners must adapt K-12 education to help students develop the skills that are likely to remain in demand (sometimes referred to as “21st century skills”). K-12 education should thus prioritize teaching critical thinking, problem solving, and teamwork across subject areas. Teaching students to become analytical thinkers, problem solvers, and good team members will allow them to remain competitive in the job market even as the nature of work changes. Equally important, these skills form a strong foundation for independent thinking that will serve students well no matter what career(s) they pursue throughout their lives.

The role of AI in education and the changing U.S. workforce

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Will community colleges solve education ‘mix-match’ with tech training?

Sun, 2018-10-28 17:20

By Halona Black, Education Dive
There is a significant imbalance between the types of jobs available in the U.S. and the number of people who have the corresponding education to apply, according to an Urban Institute report, which notes the “mix-match” is more apparent in local markets than nationally. Nearly two-thirds of U.S. jobs require a high school diploma or less at entry level, while 60% of the population has more than a high school diploma. Of adults ages 25 and older who have some level of college education, less than one-third have an associate degree. The remainder have a certificate or no credential. The report said tracking the educational progress of a community or population can help local, state and regional governments identify which industries or businesses to attract or retain. It also can help to create economic development policies that support entrepreneurship and innovation hubs.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/will-community-colleges-solve-education-mix-match-with-tech-training/540134/

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The 60 Year Curriculum: Developing New Educational Models to Serve the Agile Labor Market

Sun, 2018-10-28 17:16

Chris Dede, Evolllution
With the sponsorship of Harvard’s Division of Continuing Education (DCE), I’m participating in an initiative centered on The Sixty Year Curriculum (60YC). The Dean of DCE, Hunt Lambert, is leading this effort to transform lifelong learning, which is now a necessity in our dynamic, chaotic world. The 60YC initiative is focused on developing new educational models that enable each person to reskill as their occupational and personal context shifts.

https://evolllution.com/revenue-streams/professional_development/the-60-year-curriculum-developing-new-educational-models-to-serve-the-agile-labor-market/

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Do we need to rethink who goes to college and and why?

Sun, 2018-10-28 17:07

By Scott Romine, Greensboro News Record

In a recent article in the online magazine Quillette, Daniel Friedman points out that U.S. participation in higher education — about 65 percent — is among the highest in the world. But fully a third of those matriculating never receive a degree of any kind. Graduation rates correlate strongly with the selectivity of the institution. For the most selective four-year colleges, nearly 9 in 10 students earn their degrees. At the least selective, it’s 1 in 3.

https://www.greensboro.com/opinion/columns/scott-romine-do-we-need-to-rethink-who-goes-to/article_4cfb37ca-9e24-5a92-a2a9-e3950d98501c.html

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Adaptive Learning: A Stabilizing Influence Across Disciplines and Universities

Sun, 2018-10-28 17:05

Charles Dziuban, Colm Howlin, Patsy Moskal, Connie Johnson, Liza Parker, Maria Campbell; Online Learning

This study represents an adaptive learning partnership among The University of Central Florida, Colorado Technical University, and the platform provider Realizeit. A thirteen-variable learning domain for students forms the basis of a component invariance study. The results show that four dimensions: knowledge acquisition, engagement activities, communication and growth remain constant in nursing and mathematics courses across the two universities, indicating that the adaptive modality stabilizes learning organization in multiple disciplines. The authors contend that similar collaborative partnerships among universities and vendors is an important next step in the research process.

https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj/article/view/1465

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Gamify Online Courses with Tools Built into Your Learning Management System (LMS) to Enhance Self-Determined and Active Learning

Sun, 2018-10-28 17:02

Cheng-Chia (Brian) Chen, Online Learning

“Gamified” active learning has been shown to increase students’ academic performance, engagement, and make more social connections than standard course settings. However, the costs to use an educational game design with efficient delivery of the game/course plan can be problematic. Our first objective was to evaluate the effectiveness of gamification by using existing techniques (e.g., simple HTML-based games) and readily available collaborative tools (e.g., Wikis) from a typical learning management system (LMS) such as Blackboard. Moreover, our second objective was to examine students’ attitudes towards gamification (e.g., usefulness). Data were collected from 2015 to 2017 (n = 80) at a Midwestern university in the United State using a mixed methods approach. For the quantitative method, online surveys were conducted in an experimental group (class with implementation of gamification) and control group (class without any gamified activities) that were randomly selected from graduate level statistics courses. For the qualitative method, the researcher conducted semi-structured interviews with subjects who addressed their interests to be interviewed during the online survey. A Welch’s independent t-test revealed a significant difference (p < 0.001) in the mean exam scores of experiment and control groups. A difference favored the classes with gamification. More than 70 % of students agreed that gamified activities were either extremely or highly useful in helping them review and/or understand fundamental concepts. In conclusion, using built-in LMS tools to design gamified learning activities may enhance students’ learning outcome/effectiveness, provide more diversified learning methods and motivation, and offer easy modifications for different learning needs.

https://olj.onlinelearningconsortium.org/index.php/olj/article/view/1466

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