News & Thoughts

Subscribe to News & Thoughts feed
Engineering Education
Updated: 5 hours 37 min ago

Micro-Learning: Why Aren’t You on the Bandwagon?

Tue, 2018-03-06 16:05

by Danielle Wallace, eLearning Brothers

It’s not surprising, given the benefits associated with micro-learning, that it’s rapidly becoming the best way to offer your team necessary data to do their jobs properly. Whether your goal is to retrain people on your team, streamline the management process or ensure a level of retention, micro-learning can help make a difference. It is all about offering more to your company for less.

Micro-Learning: Why Aren’t You on the Bandwagon?

Share on Facebook

Survey: Americans not confident colleges can prepare them for AI-driven workforce

Tue, 2018-03-06 16:03

by Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive
Though 73% of Americans believe the growth of artificial intelligence will lead to net job loss, only 23% believe their jobs will be at risk, according to a survey of 3,297 U.S. citizens by Gallup and Northeastern University. But while most Americans do not fear losing work, only 22% of survey respondents with a bachelor’s degree said their education left them “well” or “very well prepared” to use AI as it becomes more widespread in their jobs.  Americans are uncertain whether institutions can provide them with the skills needed to use AI. While 51% of employed U.S. adults believe they would need additional education to obtain a new job should they lose their current one to technology, only 18% are “extremely confident” they could obtain the necessary education.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/survey-americans-not-confident-colleges-can-prepare-them-for-ai-driven-wor/

Share on Facebook

Do women in STEM experience hostile work environments?

Mon, 2018-03-05 16:20

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News

Women in STEM jobs are more likely to experience hostile work environments, including discrimination and sexual harassment, according to a new nationally-representative Pew Research Center study. Research in the study reveals that gender “is perceived as more of an impediment than an advantage to career success.” Women in three particular groups are more likely to see workplace inequities: women who are employed in STEM settings where men outnumber women, women who work in computer jobs, and women who hold postgraduate degrees.

Do women in STEM experience hostile work environments?

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

Why academic assessment is poised for a scientific revolution

Mon, 2018-03-05 16:20

BY JEFF KING, eCampus News

Consider academia’s approach to measurement: Academic transcripts can depict students’ achievements within courses and majors, but they often overlook opportunities to track and validate their growth across courses and fields, where critical interdisciplinary skills are forged. If we are to close looming gaps in our workforce, postsecondary leaders must embrace a shift that measures learning in a more holistic and granular fashion. The first step in this shift is embracing a unit of measurement that is both more precise and more comprehensive, as well as being evidence-based. Here’s how we’re already doing that at the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO).

Why academic assessment is poised for a scientific revolution

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

Coursera’s Bet On The Upskilling Of American Workers

Mon, 2018-03-05 16:15

by Michael Bernick, Forbes

The ominous “future of work” continues to dominate headlines this year. We are told to prepare for the technological change that is rendering many current skills and job duties obsolete. To help us prepare, an industry of workforce degrees, certifications, badges and other training is rapidly expanding. Our public education institutions–universities, community colleges, adult education schools—are developing workforce certificates, and “stackable” workforce certificates, to add to their degree programs. Over the past year, they have been joined in upskilling products by the online training giants, the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), including Udacity, Udemy, and most of all Coursera.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelbernick/2018/02/21/courseras-bet-on-the-upskilling-of-american-workers/#490a92d05eb2

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

Your Marketing Guide to the 4 Kinds of Adult Learners #elearning #infographic

Mon, 2018-03-05 16:10

by Wiley
The adult learner market is growing, but does your institution know who this audience is and what they want? Click on the infographic below to learn about the behaviors, motivations, and needs of the four different populations of adult learners so your institution can develop more effective recruitment strategies.

https://edservices.wiley.com/4-kinds-of-adult-learners-infographic/

Share on Facebook

Why academic assessment is poised for a scientific revolution

Mon, 2018-03-05 16:04

BY JEFF KING, eCampus News

Consider academia’s approach to measurement: Academic transcripts can depict students’ achievements within courses and majors, but they often overlook opportunities to track and validate their growth across courses and fields, where critical interdisciplinary skills are forged. If we are to close looming gaps in our workforce, postsecondary leaders must embrace a shift that measures learning in a more holistic and granular fashion. The first step in this shift is embracing a unit of measurement that is both more precise and more comprehensive, as well as being evidence-based. Here’s how we’re already doing that at the University of Central Oklahoma (UCO).

Why academic assessment is poised for a scientific revolution

Share on Facebook

Coursera’s Bet On The Upskilling Of American Workers

Mon, 2018-03-05 16:02

by Michael Bernick, Forbes

The ominous “future of work” continues to dominate headlines this year. We are told to prepare for the technological change that is rendering many current skills and job duties obsolete. To help us prepare, an industry of workforce degrees, certifications, badges and other training is rapidly expanding. Our public education institutions–universities, community colleges, adult education schools—are developing workforce certificates, and “stackable” workforce certificates, to add to their degree programs. Over the past year, they have been joined in upskilling products by the online training giants, the Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs), including Udacity, Udemy, and most of all Coursera.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelbernick/2018/02/21/courseras-bet-on-the-upskilling-of-american-workers/#490a92d05eb2

Share on Facebook

Professional learning: Three apps that bring the classroom to your smartphone

Sun, 2018-03-04 16:25

by Standard Digital

Our phones can easily mimic a classroom. You can watch videos, listen to podcasts, read slides and comment on lectures in real time. The following three apps combine all these experiences to deliver a real-world portable classroom that enables you to sharpen your skills on the go, giving you that ever-elusive edge in tackling business challenges.

https://www.standardmedia.co.ke/business/article/2001270570/three-apps-that-bring-the-classroom-to-your-smartphone

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

Confidence Crisis in Online Accessibility

Sun, 2018-03-04 16:20

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher ED
Community colleges are increasingly unsure whether their online courses meet federal accessibility requirements, survey finds. Confidence in the accessibility of online courses at community colleges has fallen dramatically in the last decade, a survey from the Instructional Technology Council reveals. Training is now mandatory for three-fourths of faculty members prior to teaching online, the survey found. Lokken said this is a “significant improvement” over previous years, but he notes that a quarter of colleges still lack any training requirements for online instructors. This year, the top five faculty-related issues administrators faced challenges with were: (1) Engaging the faculty in development of online pedagogy; (2) evaluation of faculty members; (3) training; (4) workload issues and (5) compensation.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/02/21/community-colleges-question-whether-online-courses-meet

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

Cyber Warfare Is Growing. We Need Rules to Protect Ourselves.

Sun, 2018-03-04 16:15

by Dom Galeon, Futurism

Cybersecurity has become one of today’s more pressing issues, and it’s likely to get worse in the future. That’s why the secretary-general of the U.N. is now calling for nations to come up with clearer rules to protect civilians from hacking.  Cyber warfare could simply end up becoming a race for a better technology. Guterres’ plea becomes all the more urgent when viewed with an eye for the future: “I am absolutely convinced that, differently from the great battles of the past, which opened with a barrage of artillery or aerial bombardment, the next war will begin with a massive cyber attack to destroy military capacity… and paralyze basic infrastructure,” the U.N. Secretary-General warned.

Cyber Warfare Is Growing. We Need Rules to Protect Ourselves.

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

‘Poorly Paid’ Professors

Sun, 2018-03-04 16:10

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed

Faculty members earn 15 percent less than others with advanced degrees, study finds. They work equally long hours. Professors earn about 15 percent less than others with advanced degrees, finds a study published Tuesday by the National Bureau of Economic Research. The study, “Why Are Professors ‘Poorly Paid’?,” uses data from the Current Population Survey to compare the salaries and other characteristics of those with Ph.D., Ed.D., J.D. or M.D. degrees. Those who reported their profession as “postsecondary teacher” were compared to everyone else. The study was conducted by Daniel S. Hamermesh, an economist at Barnard College.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/02/21/new-data-show-wage-gap-between-professors-and-other-advanced-degree-holders

Share on Facebook

Confidence Crisis in Online Accessibility

Sun, 2018-03-04 16:05

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher ED
Community colleges are increasingly unsure whether their online courses meet federal accessibility requirements, survey finds. Confidence in the accessibility of online courses at community colleges has fallen dramatically in the last decade, a survey from the Instructional Technology Council reveals. Training is now mandatory for three-fourths of faculty members prior to teaching online, the survey found. Lokken said this is a “significant improvement” over previous years, but he notes that a quarter of colleges still lack any training requirements for online instructors. This year, the top five faculty-related issues administrators faced challenges with were: (1) Engaging the faculty in development of online pedagogy; (2) evaluation of faculty members; (3) training; (4) workload issues and (5) compensation.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/02/21/community-colleges-question-whether-online-courses-meet

Share on Facebook

Cyber Warfare Is Growing. We Need Rules to Protect Ourselves.

Sun, 2018-03-04 16:03

by Dom Galeon, Futurism

Cybersecurity has become one of today’s more pressing issues, and it’s likely to get worse in the future. That’s why the secretary-general of the U.N. is now calling for nations to come up with clearer rules to protect civilians from hacking. Cyber warfare could simply end up becoming a race for a better technology. Guterres’ plea becomes all the more urgent when viewed with an eye for the future: “I am absolutely convinced that, differently from the great battles of the past, which opened with a barrage of artillery or aerial bombardment, the next war will begin with a massive cyber attack to destroy military capacity… and paralyze basic infrastructure,” the U.N. Secretary-General warned.

Cyber Warfare Is Growing. We Need Rules to Protect Ourselves.

Share on Facebook

With AI taking away many jobs, reskilling has become critical: Coursera founder

Sat, 2018-03-03 16:25

by Shilpa Phadnis, Times of India

AI is the new electricity and it has made significant advances to transform industries. There’s still a lot of work humans can do in the foreseeable future and we don’t seem to find enough people in some areas. We can’t find enough healthcare workers, teachers or wind turbine technicians in the US. Our educational system globally has not been historically great in reskilling for newer job roles. We need a new social contract to do that. For India, lack of an incumbent structure might be an advantage, where it can use digital education to leapfrog.

https://timesofindia.indiatimes.com/people/andrew-ng-interview/articleshow/62995821.cms

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

Cost to Connect Rural America: $19 Billion or Less

Sat, 2018-03-03 16:20

By Dian Schaffhauser, THE Journal
A group of private and public organizations said that, for less than $20 billion, every unserved rural school, library, health provider and community college in the country that doesn’t already have high-capacity broadband could get it and share it out. In a new study, the Schools, Health & Libraries Broadband (SHLB) Coalition proposed that high-speed internet be fed to these “anchor institutions,” which could then act as “middle-mile” providers to distribute the service to surrounding users through a mix of wired and wireless technologies.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/02/20/cost-to-connect-rural-america-19-billion-or-less.aspx

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

More students are taking on crippling debt they can’t repay—it’s time for higher education to share the risks

Sat, 2018-03-03 16:15

by Adam Looney, Brookings

In a new Brookings paper that uses administrative data to look at “large-balance borrowers,” New York University’s Constantine Yannelis and I find that the share of students graduating with more than $50,000 in student debt has more than tripled since 2000, increasing from 5 percent of borrowers in 2000 to 17 percent of student borrowers in 2014. That group now holds the majority of outstanding student debt owed to the government—about $790 billion of the $1.4 trillion total at the end of 2017. Among these borrowers, we’re seeing a troubling trend: They’re repaying their loans more slowly, if at all. In a country where education is still the doorway to opportunity, we should be wary of changes to our student lending system that prevent low-income students from obtaining the quality education their high-income peers can more easily afford.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2018/02/16/more-students-are-taking-on-crippling-debt-they-cant-repay-its-time-for-higher-education-to-share-the-risks/

Share on Facebook

Tweet This Post

The Demise Of The Full-Time MBA

Sat, 2018-03-03 16:10

by Michael Horn, Forbes

For nearly two decades, Clayton Christensen of the Harvard Business School has been predicting that disruptive innovations would impact management education—and that even the likes of the Harvard Business School would feel their might. As recent headlines attest, that no longer feels so far away or like a crazy prediction. Wake Forest halted its two-year full-time program in 2014. In August, the University of Iowa’s Tippie College of Business announced it was shuttering its full-time MBA program. And in October, the University of Wisconsin—one of the nation’s oldest and most prestigious public business schools—suggested it might as well.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/michaelhorn/2018/02/14/the-demise-of-the-full-time-mba/

Share on Facebook

More students are taking on crippling debt they can’t repay—it’s time for higher education to share the risks

Sat, 2018-03-03 16:04

by Adam Looney, Brookings

In a new Brookings paper that uses administrative data to look at “large-balance borrowers,” New York University’s Constantine Yannelis and I find that the share of students graduating with more than $50,000 in student debt has more than tripled since 2000, increasing from 5 percent of borrowers in 2000 to 17 percent of student borrowers in 2014. That group now holds the majority of outstanding student debt owed to the government—about $790 billion of the $1.4 trillion total at the end of 2017. Among these borrowers, we’re seeing a troubling trend: They’re repaying their loans more slowly, if at all. In a country where education is still the doorway to opportunity, we should be wary of changes to our student lending system that prevent low-income students from obtaining the quality education their high-income peers can more easily afford.

https://www.brookings.edu/blog/up-front/2018/02/16/more-students-are-taking-on-crippling-debt-they-cant-repay-its-time-for-higher-education-to-share-the-risks/

Share on Facebook

Understanding the New College Majority

Sat, 2018-03-03 16:02

by Lindsey Reichlin Cruse, M.A., Eleanor Eckerson, Barbara Gault, , Institute for Women’s Policy Research

Independent college students, once considered “nontraditional,” now constitute the majority of students in the United States. As of 2012, just over half of all U.S. college students were independent (51 percent)—meaning they had at least one defining characteristic outlined in the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), including being at least 24 years old; married; a graduate or professional student; a veteran; an orphan, in foster care, or ward of the court; a member of the armed forces; an emancipated minor; someone who is homeless or at risk of becoming homeless; or having legal dependents other than a spouse (Federal Student Aid n.d.; IWPR 2016a).

https://iwpr.org/publications/independent-students-new-college-majority/

Share on Facebook

Pages