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Engineering Education
Updated: 5 hours 35 min ago

Soon, Both Students and Teachers Will Be (Online Learning) Digital Natives

Thu, 2018-05-31 17:02

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

Much has been made for nearly the last two decades about digital natives in the context of education. First described by Marc Plensky in a 2001 landmark essay published in On the Horizon, these are the learners that grew up in the digital age. They spent more hours as young people watching TV or playing video games than they did reading. And, as some continue to complain today, they’re taught by digital immigrants. (“As Digital Immigrants learn – like all immigrants, some better than others – to adapt to their environment, they always retain, to some degree, their “accent,” that is, their foot in the past,” Plensky writes.)

Soon, Both Students and Teachers Will Be (Online Learning) Digital Natives

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Partnerships between K-12, higher ed pay dividends in variety of ways

Wed, 2018-05-30 17:25

by James Paterson, Education Dive
Educators in K-12 and higher education are finding that partnerships can benefit both sectors, according to a report from EdTech: Focus on K-12 that highlights cases where the two have creatively collaborated. Megan Toliin, director of technology and innovation for the Education Department at Indiana University–Purdue in Indianapolis said in an interview that area K-12 educators received assistance with technology for their blended classrooms in one such effort, and both college students studying technology and education got experience in schools that benefited both parties. The article describes a variety of ways such partnerships can be developed, including colleges helping K-12 schools with gathering and analyzing data, which is critical for budgeting and reporting. And universities can also use the data for research purposes.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/partnerships-between-k-12-higher-ed-pay-dividends-in-variety-of-ways/523904/

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Georgia Tech Envisions ‘Deliberate Innovation, Lifetime Education’ in New Report

Wed, 2018-05-30 17:20

by Susie Ivy, Georgia Tech

The Georgia Institute of Technology announces the official release of Deliberate Innovation, Lifetime Education, a report based on input and recommendations from the Commission on Creating the Next in Education, an Institute-wide commission of more than 50 faculty, staff, and students. Using the year 2040 as a long-term vantage point, the Commission was asked to explore and evaluate innovative approaches to higher education, and address issues facing current and future students. The group was also tasked with making recommendations on alternative educational models that reduce costs, improve the effectiveness of current methodologies, and increase opportunities and accessibility to serve the needs of the next generation and beyond.

http://www.news.gatech.edu/2018/04/24/georgia-tech-envisions-deliberate-innovation-lifetime-education-new-report

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Augmented reality could rule the classrooms of the future

Wed, 2018-05-30 17:15

by JAKE RICHARDSON, the Big Think

An analysis of research study papers pertaining to the use of AR for learning found that: ….”most of the studies reported that AR in educational settings lead to better learning performance and promoting learning motivation, which was because AR supplies the authenticity graphical content and interaction. Also, deeper student engagement improved perceived enjoyment and positive attitudes of AR are reported as the effectiveness of using AR.” Another study reached a similar conclusion: “Outcomes were consistent across all of the studies reviewed in that participants showed both an increase in conceptual knowledge and increases in topic interest and engagement.”

http://bigthink.com/jake-richardson/augmented-reality-could-rule-the-classrooms-of-the-future

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Will Blockchains Revolutionize Education?

Wed, 2018-05-30 17:10

by David McArthur, EDUCAUSE Review

Researchers, educators, and developers have envisioned various roles for blockchains in education and training, including their use for storing standards and issuing credentials. Several possibilities arise based on ideas from blockchains that provide trustworthy intellectual property records. For example, an educational standards committee might upload formal statements of their official competency hierarchies to a blockchain. Further, smart contracts managed in blockchain systems such as Ethereum could establish conditions under which a student would receive a certificate from a provider, and a series of those contracts could define a full degree program.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/5/will-blockchains-revolutionize-education

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Declining Majority of Online Adults Say the Internet Has Been Good for Society

Wed, 2018-05-30 17:05

BY AARON SMITH AND KENNETH OLMSTEAD, Pew Internet
At the same time, the contours of connectivity are shifting: One-in-five Americans are now ‘smartphone only’ internet users at home.  Americans tend to view the impact of the internet and other digital technologies on their own lives in largely positive ways, Pew Research Center surveys have shown over the years. A survey of U.S. adults conducted in January 2018 finds continuing evidence of this trend, with the vast majority of internet users (88%) saying the internet has, on balance, been a mostly good thing for them personally. But even as they view the internet’s personal impact in a positive light, Americans have grown somewhat more ambivalent about the impact of digital connectivity on society as a whole.

http://www.pewinternet.org/2018/04/30/declining-majority-of-online-adults-say-the-internet-has-been-good-for-society/

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Show What You Know: The Shift To Competency

Wed, 2018-05-30 17:02

by Tom Vander Ark, Forbes

“GPAs are worthless as a criteria for hiring, and test scores are worthless,” said Laszlo Bock, former head of HR at Google. “Google famously used to ask everyone for a transcript and GPAs and test scores, but we don’t anymore, unless you’re just a few years out of school. We found that they don’t predict anything,” added Bock. In the now famous 2013 interview with the New York Times, Bock signaled the beginning of the end of courses and credits as the primary measure of learning and the beginning of the show what you know era. Professions (including law, real estate, and accounting) have long relied on test-based measured of readiness. Some professions have gone a step beyond to require demonstrated competence (e.g., doctors and pilots are required to pass tests, endure simulations, and perform in a variety of live settings).

https://www.forbes.com/sites/tomvanderark/2018/05/21/show-what-you-know-the-shift-to-competency/#6687f2a81a5b

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Making The Learning Experience Student-Centered To Combat The Skills Gap From College To Career

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:26

by Troy Markowitz, Forbes

When students are cognizant of the relevance between their education and their desired career, 63% are more likely to agree that their education was worth the cost and 50% are more likely to agree that they received a high-quality education. Today, however, college graduates are unable to make potential employers aware of the skills they’ve developed through their coursework and co-curricular activities, leading to dissatisfaction with the quality and value of their postsecondary education.

This skills gap, or what I’ve more precisely denoted as the “awareness gap,” is dangerous for the longevity of institutions and also the foundation of our educational system.

https://www.forbes.com/sites/troymarkowitz/2018/05/10/making-the-learning-experience-student-centered-to-combat-the-skills-gap-from-college-to-career/#6b3e9fb25c56

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An 80 credit-hour bachelor’s degree?

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:20

By Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive
Lucas Kavlie, vice president for compliance and accreditation at Western Governor’s University, makes an argument that if the nation wants to decrease student debt burdens and increase student completion rates, the best way to achieve both is to “move the finish line closer” and create degree programs that require fewer credit hours.  “Institutions are judged on whether or not the students in their program are graduating in four or six years,” Kavlie said in a recent phone conversation with Education Dive. “If people were smart, they’d say we can raise our four-year grad rates by lowering the number of credit hours that people need to do” to get to the degree. He pointed out that under the Affordable Healthcare Act, a full-time employee is one who works 30 or more hours per week and, assuming two hours of out-of-class work for every hour of in-class instruction, students technically hit this mark with 10 credit hours per semester.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/an-80-credit-hour-bachelors-degree/523566/

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Student ROI more dependent on degree than status of institution – Shalina Chatlani, Education Dive

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:14

When it comes to student return on investment, differences in marketplace value among fields of study means that students are often able to earn higher salaries with significantly less education, because what they make no longer depends on “how many degrees” are earned or “where you go to college,” said Anthony Carnevale, director of Georgetown University’s Center on Education and the Workforce, during a recent episode of “In Focus” from Georgetown’s School of Continuing Studies.  Carnevale said there’s a $3.3 million career-earnings difference between the highest-paying bachelor’s degree and the lowest-paying bachelor’s degree, and because of this gap, 40% of people with bachelor’s degrees make more than those with graduate degrees, on average.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/student-roi-more-dependent-on-degree-than-status-of-institution/523421/

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Brookings survey finds worries over AI impact on jobs and personal privacy, concern U.S. will fall behind China

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:10

 

by Darrell M. West, Brookings

To examine attitudes towards AI, researchers at the Brookings Institution undertook an online national survey of 1,535 adult Internet users between May 9 and May 11, 2018. There has been considerable controversy over the workforce impact of AI and whether it will create new jobs or reduce the number of jobs. When asked about the employment impact, 12 percent indicated they thought artificial intelligence would create jobs, 13 percent believed it would have no effect on jobs, 38 percent said it would reduce jobs, and 37 percent didn’t know or gave no answer. Men (42 percent) were more likely than women (34 percent) to say AI will reduce jobs. The group most likely to feel that way were people aged 25 to 34 years old as 43 percent of them felt that way.

Brookings survey finds worries over AI impact on jobs and personal privacy, concern U.S. will fall behind China

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Should large companies co-provide university courses?

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:10

By Tony Featherstone, Sydney Morning Herald

Picture this: a top law firm and a university law school form a commercial joint venture to provide undergraduate and postgraduate law degrees. Each has equity in the new company. A mix of university lecturers and law firm staff teach the course, providing theory and practice. The course has a higher component of online learning compared to traditional degrees. There is more industry-based learning as students spend time at the law firm.

https://www.smh.com.au/business/small-business/companies-joint-venture-university-courses-degrees-20180508-p4ze2z.html

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Enrollment Declines Steepest in Midwest and Northeast

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:06

By Paul Fain, Inside Higher Ed
Overall college enrollments continue to slide, according to the latest data from the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center, a nonprofit that tracks 97 percent of students who attend degree-granting institutions that are eligible to receive federal financial aid. This spring the center found a decline of more than 275,000 students, or 1.8 percent, compared to the previous spring. The decrease follows six straight years where fewer students attended college in the U.S. Enrollments went down in 34 states this spring, the center said. Six of the 10 states with the largest declines are in the Midwest or Northeast (see below).

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/05/22/enrollment-declines-steepest-midwest-and-northeast

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Going beyond the hype: How AI can be used to make a difference

Tue, 2018-05-29 17:02

BY ELENA COX, eCampus News
Artificial intelligence’s potential to reduce human error and to scale human expertise is worth understanding.  We can also measure inspired ideas and expertise by administration, faculty, advisors, coaches, and others for correlation to individual success and evidence of performance at scale. We have found variables in the output that are low- to no-cost to test in control trials and then at scale. This combination of actionable data, extracted with precision, and affordable practices that work at scale is the powerful promise of AI to education. Realizing this promise depends on human intelligence and discipline around data practices. With dialogue about AI and ML becoming pervasive, and often surrounded by excitement, it is important that everyone in this sector gain a basic understanding and language on this subject. Otherwise, this dialogue can become another hyperbole.

Going beyond the hype: How AI can be used to make a difference

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How artificial intelligence will change the future of work

Mon, 2018-05-28 17:25

by Fred Dews, Darrell M. West, and Bill Finan; Brookings

Darrell West, director of the Center for Technology Innovation, discusses his recent book “The Future of Work: Robotics, AI, and Automation.” West explains that as robots, artificial intelligence, and automation make it possible to be more productive while working fewer hours, society must change its definition of work.

 

How artificial intelligence will change the future of work

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The Future of Learning and How It Could Change Your Classroom

Mon, 2018-05-28 17:20

by Dan, Beth, and Beckie, Chronicle of Higher Ed

If you want more students to succeed, particularly at a time when more disadvantaged students are coming into higher education, then you need to be more deliberate in figuring out what works and trying to bring it to scale. One person described it to me by saying that the artisanal approach to teaching isn’t going to work anymore. I don’t think that means we’re going to have a bunch of robots teaching students, though. Professors should expect measurement and data and analytics to only increase (at least for those who don’t teach at small colleges). It also means they need to advocate collectively for more support to help them do their jobs better. There’s a big disconnect between what academic leaders say they want to do to support student success and what is actually offered to encourage better teaching. In my report, I really hit that point hard — don’t assume your faculty is technophobic or resistant to change. Their concerns are real, and you should pay attention to what they need.

https://www.chronicle.com/article/The-Future-of-LearningHow/243437

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Will Google Duplex Evolve Into a Virtual Teaching Assistant?

Mon, 2018-05-28 17:14

by Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

Once we get over Google’s boneheaded failure to clearly indicate that the calls were originating from a computer, can we take a step back and try to think about the implications of this technology? What Google is demonstrating with Duplex is the ability of AI (artificial intelligence) to have conversations.  Right now, these conversations are limited.  Duplex will be able to call and make a dinner reservation or a styling appointment, but it is not clear what else the technology will be able to do. The current generation of personal digital voice assistants – Apple’s Siri and Amazon’s Alexa and Google’s Assistant and Microsoft’s Cortana – are just not all that useful.  They seem like a technology in search of a problem to solve.

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/will-google-duplex-evolve-virtual-teaching-assistant

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OPINION: The serious consequences of DeVos’ about-face on for-profit colleges Will students of color suffer the most?

Mon, 2018-05-28 17:10

by Hechinger Report

The Education Department, under Betsy DeVos, halted the gainful employment regulation and proposed a new rule in its stead that would eliminate any sanctions — that is, institutions would no longer lose access to federal aid if the employment rates and salaries of graduates fall below the federal threshold. The Department also suspended the borrower defense rule. And, according to The New York Times, the department has sharply cut back the staff and mission of the enforcement unit. It now consists of only three people and is focusing on student-loan forgiveness rather than investigating the practices of for-profit institutions.

http://hechingerreport.org/opinion-the-serious-consequences-of-devos-about-face-on-non-profit-colleges/

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Georgia Tech Envisions ‘Deliberate Innovation, Lifetime Education’ in New Report

Mon, 2018-05-28 17:06

by Susie Ivy, Georgia Tech

The Georgia Institute of Technology announces the official release of Deliberate Innovation, Lifetime Education, a report based on input and recommendations from the Commission on Creating the Next in Education, an Institute-wide commission of more than 50 faculty, staff, and students. Using the year 2040 as a long-term vantage point, the Commission was asked to explore and evaluate innovative approaches to higher education, and address issues facing current and future students. The group was also tasked with making recommendations on alternative educational models that reduce costs, improve the effectiveness of current methodologies, and increase opportunities and accessibility to serve the needs of the next generation and beyond.

http://www.news.gatech.edu/2018/04/24/georgia-tech-envisions-deliberate-innovation-lifetime-education-new-report

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How Digital Credentialing is Driving the Shift Towards a Learning Economy

Mon, 2018-05-28 17:03

by Louis Soares, Evolllution

Digital credentials are at the forefront of broader technological innovation in the academic sector and signal the possibility of broader cooperation between higher education and the labor market—but, as Louis Soares points out, the revolution towards a true learning economy is far from finished. For evidence of this expansion, the American Council on Education (ACE) has partnered with Credly to allow participants in ACE’s College Credit Recommendation Service to award badges recognizing professional and academic achievements. In this interview, Soares lays the groundwork for continued growth in digital credentialing, and discusses the role of the ACE in exploring, adopting and acculturating technological change in higher education.

How Digital Credentialing is Driving the Shift Towards a Learning Economy

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