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Engineering Education
Updated: 22 hours 19 min ago

5 questions CEOs are asking about AI

Sun, 2018-11-18 16:20

by Jill Dyche, CIO

Recently in a risk management meeting, I watched a data scientist explain to a group of executives why convolutional neural networks were the algorithm of choice to help discover fraudulent transactions. The executives—all of whom agreed that the company needed to invest in artificial intelligence—seemed baffled by the need for so much detail. “How will we know if it’s working?” asked a senior director to the visible relief of his colleagues. Although they believe AI’s value, many executives are still wondering about its adoption. The following five questions are boardroom staples:

https://www.cio.com/article/3318639/artificial-intelligence/5-questions-ceos-are-asking-about-ai.html

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4 ed tech trends colleges should be ready for

Sun, 2018-11-18 16:15

Hallie Busta, Education Dive
The blockchain and artificial intelligence are among several technologies and practices poised to impact higher ed. The way America goes to college is changing. Rising tuition and new workforce development pathways are encouraging prospective students to consider alternative post-secondary education options. Meanwhile, higher education is consolidating and the colleges remaining are taking programs online to reach a wider audience. And technologies such as augmented and virtual reality are changing the nature of instruction. Yet interest in addressing and even capitalizing on these changes has been measured among higher education leaders. Just 12% of college presidents ranked institutional research in information technology as an important area of development in the American Council on Education’s (ACE’s) latest American College President Study, according to ACE President Ted Mitchell during a presentation at Educause’s annual convention last week in Denver. That’s not to say transformation isn’t quietly underway. “It’s currently happening, and right under our noses,” said Mitchell.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/4-ed-tech-trends-colleges-should-be-ready-for/541384/

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Why Higher Ed’s Global Brands Are Starting Nondegree Online Programs

Sun, 2018-11-18 16:13

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed
Are we at the leading edge of a trend that will see demand for master’s programs from regional institutions eroded by the emergence of nondegree/non-credit-bearing online programs from elite institutions? A drop in the demand for master’s degrees would have significant consequences for many colleges and universities. Over the last 45 years, the number of master’s degrees conferred annually by colleges and universities in the U.S. has more than tripled, from 236,000 in 1970 to 759,000 in 2015. Many schools rely on revenues from master’s programs to offset the costs associated with undergraduate degrees, and in particular, the growth of undergraduate tuition discounting. Whereas over 80 percent of undergraduates receive some institutional financial aid, less than 40 percent of master’s candidates have their tuition discounted. The average annual tuition for a master’s program is around $15,000 per year and over $20,000 at private institutions. At many regional universities, the tuition for master’s programs runs much higher.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/blogs/technology-and-learning/why-higher-eds-global-brands-are-starting-nondegree

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Who is really responsible for identifying, tracking student outcomes?

Sun, 2018-11-18 16:09

By Hallie Busta, Education Dive
How are colleges and universities using data and analytics to capture and support efforts to improve student outcomes? And whose job is it, anyway?  A report out earlier this year based on a study by three industry groups explores the roles of three key stakeholder groups whose responsibilities, they found, overlap more often than anticipated when it came to measuring student success. Those groups are institutional research, student affairs and information technology; more than 900 responses were collected.  “No one part of the field owns student success,” said D. Christopher Brooks, director of research at the Educause Center for Analysis and Research (ECAR), during a panel session Wednesday discussing the findings at the association’s annual meeting in Denver. “It requires partnerships across the institution, breaking down the silos and looking for ways we can collaborate from the beginning of the process.”

https://www.educationdive.com/news/who-is-really-responsible-for-identifying-tracking-student-outcomes/541134/

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So You Think You Need a Chief Digital Officer?

Sun, 2018-11-18 16:05

Knowledge@ Wharton
Back in 2000, many enterprises wondered whether they needed a head of e-commerce. Today, the question has become: Do you need a chief digital officer (CDO) to drive business in the digital age? But that’s not the fundamental question, write Scott A. Snyder and Shaloo Kulkarni in this opinion piece. “By making sure you start with the right questions instead of the answer you will be more likely to put yourself on a path towards being a digital leader,” they add. Snyder is a senior fellow at Wharton and a partner, digital and innovation, at Heidrick & Struggles. Kulkarni is principal, digital transformation, at the firm.

http://knowledge.wharton.upenn.edu/article/do-you-need-a-chief-digital-officer/

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College students at risk of cyberbullying

Sat, 2018-11-17 16:25

By: Adán Rubio, Daily Toreador

Hateful comments, hacking or threats are just some forms of cyberbullying one may endure. With the use of technology on college campuses, students may be more susceptible to this issue. With college students consistently being plugged in, cyberbullying may be a problem they have to face, whether it be on social media or through email. Most people may associate any kind of bullying with student interactions in high school or middle school. But anyone, college student or not, could fall victim to cyberbullying.

http://www.dailytoreador.com/news/college-students-at-risk-of-cyberbullying/article_0c745e24-e087-11e8-aafa-07fda0fcc38a.html

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An Online Mentoring Model That Works

Sat, 2018-11-17 16:20

By: Mary Jane Pearson, Faculty Focus

Recent findings indicate that higher education enrollment is being outpaced by online enrollments while overall enrollment in higher education has declined over the last three years (Betts, 2017). Data analyzed from the U.S. Department of Education confirm that enrollment in online courses in higher education has more than tripled in the years from 2002 to 2014: 2002, 1.6 million; 2014, 5.8 million (Poulin & Straut, 2016). Robinia (2008), in a study on the efficacy of online teaching faculty, found that effective faculty supported the value of instructional expertise and peer/mentoring support. Mentoring adjunct faculty is beneficial as it helps them become connected and part of a community; they feel valued and inspired, and they are invested in the university in which they teach (Linton, 2017). Moreover, such mentoring should exist throughout the retention of the adjunct faculty member, and not be limited to only new adjunct faculty, to continue to achieve positive results with students.

https://www.facultyfocus.com/articles/online-education/an-online-mentoring-model-that-works/

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How artificial intelligence and virtual reality are changing higher ed instruction

Sat, 2018-11-17 16:15

Natalie Schwartz, Education Dive
Technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI) and virtual reality (VR) are rapidly expanding opportunities for teaching and learning, and they are giving college administrators new and different ways to track student outcomes. To learn more about the impact of these technologies, we attended a handful of panels on the topic led by higher education and technology leaders at Educause’s annual conference in Denver this week. From teaching with VR to tracking student success with AI, we explore how colleges and universities are using new technologies to conduct research, teach students and create smarter campuses.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/how-artificial-intelligence-and-virtual-reality-are-changing-higher-ed-inst/541247/

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Online Education Ascends: New Record Enrollments Nationally

Sat, 2018-11-17 16:10

Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

The Education Department’s National Center for Education Statistics, published Tuesday shows that while overall postsecondary enrollment dropped by almost 90,000 students, nearly half a percentage point, from fall 2016 to fall 2017 — confirming data previously published by the National Student Clearinghouse — the number of all students who took at least some of their courses online grew by more than 350,000, a healthy 5.7 percent. The proportion of all students who were enrolled exclusively online grew to 15.4 percent (up from 14.7 percent in 2016), or about one in six students. The share of all students who mixed online and in-person courses grew slightly faster, to 17.6 percent in 2017 from 16.4 percent in 2016. And the proportion of all students who took at least one course online grew to 33.1 percent, from 31.1 percent in 2016. That last data point represents a steady march in the normalization of online learning, as the proportion of all enrolled students who had studied online stood under a quarter in 2012. But while fans of online learning are likely to be heartened by that slow but sure rise in acceptance, the pure increase in online enrollments — at a time of overall dips in postsecondary attendance — may be just as noteworthy.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/11/07/new-data-online-enrollments-grow-and-share-overall-enrollment

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‘Outcast mavericks’ teach traditional universities a few things about online education

Sat, 2018-11-17 16:05

DAINA LAWRENCE, GLOBE AND MAIL

Online and distance education have been the bread and butter for decades for some Canadian postsecondary institutions, including Athabasca University in Alberta and Victoria-based Royal Roads University. But the country’s traditional halls of higher learning, known more for their on-campus offerings, are increasing their online programs as well to ensure they don’t lose or inconvenience students who want the flexibility of taking classes and programs online. Now, Canada’s traditional universities are knocking on the doors of Dr. Grundy and his online-centric counterparts to see what they can do to adopt more e-learning into their academic models. “We’ve certainly been open with people who want to explore the way we do it and there’s certainly increasing interest, for sure, from everybody,” he says.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/business/article-outcast-mavericks-teach-traditional-universities-a-few-things-about/

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Putting Standardization Second (or Lower) in Online Learning

Sat, 2018-11-17 16:02

Scott Moore, Inside Higher Ed

The primary goal should be to deliver an excellent learning experience. The definition of “excellent” will vary by program, by institution, by faculty member and by student. You have one set of needs in a liberal arts undergraduate program and a different set in a master’s engineering program. However, the common goal should be the same: to deliver an excellent learning experience. It’s not that budget and standardization aren’t important, but there is such a thing as focusing on them too early and placing too high a priority on them.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/views/2018/11/07/online-learning-should-prioritize-quality-and-mission-over

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Evidence on Value of Personalized Learning Still Needs to Catch Up

Fri, 2018-11-16 16:25

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology
Although educators have enthusiastically promoted personalized learning, there’s still “imperfect evidence” that it leads to improved outcomes for students. Likewise, curriculum for personalized learning is “underdeveloped,” and policies still exist that could “hinder” its success. In other words, it could be set up to fail, according to a recent RAND Corp. perspective. As the assessment suggested, educators “who want to use rigorous research evidence to guide their designs will find many gaps and will be left with important unanswered questions about which practices or combinations of practices are effective.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/11/05/evidence-on-value-of-personalized-learning-still-needs-to-catch-up.aspx

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IT Security Tops Educause Issues List 4 Years Running

Fri, 2018-11-16 16:20

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

In the coming year, IT organizations in colleges and universities expect to be grappling with “data-enabling” their institutions, funding, and setting up their units as institutional leaders and change agents. That’s what IT leaders told Educause in its latest survey to determine the top 10 IT issues for higher education.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/11/05/it-security-tops-educause-issues-list-4-years-running.aspx

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Harvard or MIT? Choice may become obsolete with ‘stackable’ online degrees custom-built like Lego, edX CEO says

Fri, 2018-11-16 16:15

by Peace Chiu, South China Morning Post

Speaking in Cambridge, Massachusetts last week, edX founder and CEO Professor Anant Agarwal said the firm was working towards launching “stackable” MicroBachelors courses in three years. “You can think of education as Lego,” said the electrical engineering and computer science expert, who was recently awarded a Yidan Prize for his innovations in education development. He said MicroBachelors courses could be used to customise an undergraduate degree and shorten study time.

https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/education/article/2171613/harvard-or-mit-choice-may-become-obsolete-stackable-online

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Voice engine optimization

Fri, 2018-11-16 16:05

by Emily Alford, ClickZ

By 2020, as many as 70 million U.S. households will own an Amazon Echo, Google Home, or Sonos One. That’s probably because smart speakers and voice assistants save time and make life easier; at least that’s what smart speaker owners say. According to the IAB, 18% of American consumers already own smart devices, and 65% of those owners say they couldn’t imagine going back to life without them. Studies show that more than half of consumers are using smart devices for convenience. It’s just much easier to ask Alexa how long to roast a chicken than it is to Google it yourself. And studies indicate that consumers would like to extend that use of voice search to finding local businesses and making purchases. In fact, 27% are already using voice search as their primary means of finding local businesses.

https://www.clickz.com/voice-engine-optimization-strategy/220274/

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4 ed tech trends colleges should be ready for

Fri, 2018-11-16 16:03

Hallie Busta, Education Dive
The blockchain and artificial intelligence are among several technologies and practices poised to impact higher ed. The way America goes to college is changing. Rising tuition and new workforce development pathways are encouraging prospective students to consider alternative post-secondary education options. Meanwhile, higher education is consolidating and the colleges remaining are taking programs online to reach a wider audience. And technologies such as augmented and virtual reality are changing the nature of instruction. Yet interest in addressing and even capitalizing on these changes has been measured among higher education leaders. Just 12% of college presidents ranked institutional research in information technology as an important area of development in the American Council on Education’s (ACE’s) latest American College President Study, according to ACE President Ted Mitchell during a presentation at Educause’s annual convention last week in Denver. That’s not to say transformation isn’t quietly underway. “It’s currently happening, and right under our noses,” said Mitchell.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/4-ed-tech-trends-colleges-should-be-ready-for/541384/

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Distance Learning in Corporate Training – The Business of Learning podcast, Episode 11

Fri, 2018-11-16 16:01

Training Industry

For National Distance Learning Week, Ken Conn (past president and chairman of the board, U.S. Distance Learning Association) and Melissa Loble (senior vice president of customer success and partnerships, Instructure) share their thoughts on distance learning, what the future of online training looks like, and what corporate L&D leaders can learn from K-12 and university education.

https://trainingindustry.com/articles/e-learning/the-business-of-learning-episode-11-distance-learning-in-corporate-training/

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Amazon Wants to Teach Kids to Code

Thu, 2018-11-15 16:26

by Dorothy Gundy, VOA

Amazon wants to get more young people to consider becoming computer engineers. The American technology company this week launched a program that aims to teach more than 10 million students a year how to code. Amazon says it will pay for summer camps and other costs for young people from low-income families. It also will offer teacher training at low-income schools. The program is called Amazon Future Engineer. Amazon hopes the programs will help bring more African-American, Hispanic and female students to the field of computer science.

https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/amazon-wants-to-teach-kids-to-code/4638850.html

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Ignore AI Fear Factor at Your Peril: A Futurist’s Call for ‘Digital Ethics’

Thu, 2018-11-15 16:20

by Doug Black, Enterprise Tech

This time, AI isn’t fooling around. This time, AI is in earnest, and so are its related technologies: robotics, 3-D printing, genomics, machine/deep learning, man-machine interface, IoT, HPC at the edge, quantum – the gamut of new data-driven technologies. In decades past, AI has gotten off to hyped false starts, but not this time, the building blocks are in place for the convergence of data-driven power evolving toward an AI supernova that will bring with it profound changes to human existence over the decades to come. With this expectation has come serious thinking – and worrying – about AI’s potential negative impacts. Naturally, AI investors and developers are going full speed ahead while airily dismissing AI fear as generally baseless. Rarely from within the industry do we hear voices – Elon Musk’s is an exception – calling for controls on AI.

 

https://www.enterprisetech.com/2018/11/03/ignore-the-ai-fear-factor-at-your-peril-a-futurists-call-for-digital-ethics/

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Make sure you’re not investing in zombie AI

Thu, 2018-11-15 16:15

DAN ROTELLI, Venture Beat

Among the throngs of zombie AI systems, though, exist a few quality AI systems. These systems are highly intelligent, and though they have some minor human dependencies, they produce incredibly reliable results. The developers of these systems want customers to have a good grasp of the ‘magic’ behind the intelligence – ‘magic’ that really amounts to specific settings, mechanics, controls, even known limitations. True AI can be recognized by its interactivity and trainability. These systems combine intuitive interfaces with algorithms, instructions that tell the robotic brain what logic to use. And with a little coaching along the way, true AI gets smarter and learns to differentiate right from wrong. Compared to zombie systems, true AI systems require more time investment initially but are typically more sustainable in the long run because the coaching continually improves them over time.

https://venturebeat.com/2018/11/03/make-sure-youre-not-investing-in-zombie-ai/

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