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Engineering Education
Updated: 12 hours 38 min ago

6 Study Hacks To Help You Ace Your Online Course

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:25

by SOPHIE NICOLAS, Junkee

Studying online can actually be pretty fun. You don’t have to endure any awkward first day ice breakers, or sit through boring lectures. In fact, you can literally just skip the boring bits and cut to the chase. You pretty much run your own schedule.  But sometimes without uni friends to motivate you, or without an attendance record to force you to go to class, it’s easy to feel a bit blasé about your study. Here are six study hacks you need to ace your online course.

http://junkee.com/6-study-hacks-to-help-you-ace-your-online-course/122035

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Online classes take teaching from stage to screen

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:20

Thomas Klassen, Toronto Star

University and college students will soon be back in their classrooms. However, more and more students now study online, rather than in a classroom. This is both positive and worrisome. I know, as earlier this summer I taught my first online university course. Online education is a transformative disruption in teaching and learning. Freed from physical constraints, learning becomes more accessible and teaching techniques more innovative. More than one-quarter of post-secondary students in Canada have registered in at least one online course.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2017/09/05/online-classes-take-teaching-from-stage-to-screen.html

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Coursera’s Online MBAs Could Be Big Business

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:16

Adam Lashinsky, Fortune

Coursera and its ilk—Udacity and Minera Project are two examples—are an appropriate topic of conversation on the day after Americans honor those who work. Coursera’s take is that higher education is too expensive and too airy-fairy to meet the needs of today’s students. What’s needed are specific classes that serve the needs of today’s students, like courses on how to code specific software languages and brand-new fields like machine learning and data science. Coursera also is working with individual employers like Google to design classes that employees and developers need to succeed on their platforms.  Coursera sells access to groupings of courses it calls “specializations,” sold as a subscription for $49 a month. It also has created online degrees with prestigious universities, including a $20,000 MBA from the University of Illinois (my alma mater) that Maggioncalda says would cost $118,000 in person.

http://fortune.com/2017/09/05/courseras-online-mbas-could-be-big-business/

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Standardization in Online Education

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:15

By Ashley A. Smith, Inside Higher Ed
Accreditor’s [HLC] rejection of Scottsdale Community College’s online expansion suggests that consistency and mandated faculty training could become a focus for quality control in online education.  A regional accreditor recently denied an Arizona community college’s bid to increase its online degree offerings, with a decision that highlights challenges colleges may face when seeking to expand their online presence. In a peer review report, which Inside Higher Ed obtained, HLC’s reviewers described “strong foundational components critical to online delivery and a clear passion for such delivery.  In particular, the reviewers found a lack of required training for online instruction. “SCC’s contract with the faculty was cited as the reason training could not be mandated. Further authority for reviewing and overseeing online delivery was pushed down to the department level.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2017/09/15/accreditor-denies-arizona-community-colleges-bid-expand-online

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Gamification: What E-Learning Modules Can Learn from Video Games

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:09

By Henry Kronk, e-learning inside
When most people start a new job at a fast food restaurant, they might expect to watch a requisite – and boring – training video. But for new cooks at KFC, the initiation process is definitely weirder. As new employees enter on their first day, they are now given an Oculus Rift VR headset to wear. The game they must play is best described as an insane VR escape room where they must correctly progress through the five steps of the KFC cooking process before they can get out. Colonel Sanders himself heckles each employee throughout the process. The new system might sound like a quirky publicity stunt, but KFC claims that it takes players an average of 10 minutes to beat the game, while the previous teaching method took 25 minutes.

Gamification: What E-Learning Modules Can Learn from Video Games

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New report illustrates challenges part-time students face

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:05

by Pat Donachie, Education Dive

Higher education institutions are failing to adequately service part-time students, with only about a quarter of such students attaining a degree within the eight years they begin college, according to a new report from the Center for American Progress, with four out of every ten students who enrolled exclusively part-time in their first year not returning for their second. Part of the issue is due to a lack of comprehensive data at the national level, according to Marcella Bombardieri, the author of the report and a senior policy analyst on the postsecondary education team for CAP. She noted that often community college administrators, when asked about what they were doing to assist part-time or transfer students, would respond that “everything” they do is for those student groups, because they often make up the most significant proportion of community college enrollees.

http://www.educationdive.com/news/new-report-illustrates-challenges-part-time-students-face/504501/

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How online graduate programs offer degrees at significant savings

Thu, 2017-09-14 17:03

by PBS

As technology evolves and more online graduate programs become available at a much lower cost, should we reconsider traditional higher education in a classroom setting? Hari Sreenivasan reports on how some students earning master’s degrees at Georgia Tech are paying little or nothing for online courses from a top program.

http://www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/online-graduate-programs-offer-degrees-significant-savings/

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Future Higher Ed IT Spending Will Be Driven by Cloud and Mobile

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:20

by Meghan Bogardus Cortez, Education Dive
This year, IT spending across industries will increase by 4.5 percent, rising to $2.1 trillion, and then increase by another 4 percent in 2018. IDC, which conducted the research, indicates that cloud infrastructure and mobile devices will be the source of the upswing. “Cloud and mobile are still the big drivers for IT spending, despite the attention devoted to new technologies like augmented reality, artificial intelligence and robotics,” says Stephen Minton, IDC vice president for customer insights and analysis, on Campus Technology. Universities are also prioritizing cloud and mobile as they update their technology. A survey last year indicated that 81 percent of university IT leaders were planning to increase their cloud spending. In 2016, 39 percent of their applications were cloud-based, but that number is expected to rise to 62 percent by 2021.

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2017/09/future-higher-ed-it-spending-will-be-driven-cloud-and-mobile

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The Rise of the Online Exam Proctor

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:15

By Cait Etherington, e-learning Inside

It’s a fact: Sometimes students cheat on exams. This is why exam proctors remain necessary at all levels of the education system. In most cases proctors are anonymous individuals who pass out exams and then pace up and down watching you while you write. The proctor is also the person who typically says time is up and retrieves your exam…whether or not you’ve completed it. In short, they are the eyes and ears of the education system in testing situations, but the days of human proctors may be numbered.

https://news.elearninginside.com/the-rise-of-the-online-exam-proctor/

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Learning to learn could be built into online courses

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:15

by Punch
Why do some of us learn easily and quickly, while others struggle, left behind plodding along? Part of the answer, at least in the online learning space, is that learning is a real skill in and of itself, and some people are more skilled at it than others. And the good news for the plodders is that it is a skill that can be readily grasped when we break it down. I’ve analysed the data from over 100,000 learners on the University of Melbourne’s various MOOCs or massive open online courses – every click, tap, swipe they make, every document they consult and every word they write in chat forums and exercises. What emerged was a remarkably consistent pattern of which learning behaviours work and which don’t. It means that it should be possible to design online learning systems that not only teach skills and knowledge, but also at the same time teach students how best to learn.

http://punchng.com/learning-to-learn-could-be-built-into-online-courses/

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Is Your School Prepared for the Future of Education

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:15

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

The future of education is digital. We live in an increasingly digital world, where technology is a part of our lives in so many ways. Now more than ever, it is crucial that we incorporate digital technology into education. To prepare students for higher education and future jobs, we must ensure that they are familiar with technology.  Administrators who want to prepare their K-12 school for the future of education should look at the ways they use technology in the classroom. Schools that are future-ready are those that blend technology with learning seamlessly and include technology in nearly every lesson. To prepare for this digital future, many schools are adopting a one-to-one program. In this type of program, there is one computer or tablet for every student. Schools with one-to-one programs have seen a boost in students’ achievement, especially when it comes to their 21st-century skills.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/school-ready-future-education/

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Online classes take teaching from stage to screen

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:05

Thomas Klassen, Toronto Star

University and college students will soon be back in their classrooms. However, more and more students now study online, rather than in a classroom. This is both positive and worrisome. I know, as earlier this summer I taught my first online university course. Online education is a transformative disruption in teaching and learning. Freed from physical constraints, learning becomes more accessible and teaching techniques more innovative. More than one-quarter of post-secondary students in Canada have registered in at least one online course.

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2017/09/05/online-classes-take-teaching-from-stage-to-screen.html

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Coursera’s Online MBAs Could Be Big Business

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:03

Adam Lashinsky, Fortune

Coursera and its ilk—Udacity and Minera Project are two examples—are an appropriate topic of conversation on the day after Americans honor those who work. Coursera’s take is that higher education is too expensive and too airy-fairy to meet the needs of today’s students. What’s needed are specific classes that serve the needs of today’s students, like courses on how to code specific software languages and brand-new fields like machine learning and data science. Coursera also is working with individual employers like Google to design classes that employees and developers need to succeed on their platforms.  Coursera sells access to groupings of courses it calls “specializations,” sold as a subscription for $49 a month. It also has created online degrees with prestigious universities, including a $20,000 MBA from the University of Illinois (my alma mater) that Maggioncalda says would cost $118,000 in person.

http://fortune.com/2017/09/05/courseras-online-mbas-could-be-big-business/

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6 Study Hacks To Help You Ace Your Online Course

Wed, 2017-09-13 17:02

by SOPHIE NICOLAS, Junkee

Studying online can actually be pretty fun. You don’t have to endure any awkward first day ice breakers, or sit through boring lectures. In fact, you can literally just skip the boring bits and cut to the chase. You pretty much run your own schedule.  But sometimes without uni friends to motivate you, or without an attendance record to force you to go to class, it’s easy to feel a bit blasé about your study. Here are six study hacks you need to ace your online course.

http://junkee.com/6-study-hacks-to-help-you-ace-your-online-course/122035

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These are the ‘robot proof’ jobs of the future: Pew Research

Tue, 2017-09-12 17:22

by Beth Corsentino, CNBC
A recent study found that more than half of Americans are afraid they will lose their job to a robot. While plenty of jobs could be in jeopardy, there are certain fields that could be considered “robot proof.” Lee Rainie, director of Internet and technology research at the Pew Research Center, calls these positions “high touch jobs” that are not in danger of being outsourced, he explained to CNBC’s “On The Money” recently. Fox example, positions like hair stylists, doctors, nurses or even physical therapists could turn into high growth industries. “Anything that involves dealing directly with the public and taking care of them, either their needs in health or other places” are likely to survive the robot onslaught, Rainie said.

https://www.cnbc.com/2017/09/01/these-are-the-robot-proof-jobs-of-the-future-pew-research.html

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Revolutionizing the university for the digital era

Tue, 2017-09-12 17:16

By Michael S. Roth, Washington Post

At its core, the new education Cathy Davidson envisions creates a platform for student-centered, active learning. Technology will be a part of that, but only if it enhances student agency. She cites approvingly the conclusion of Tressie McMillan Cottom, a sociologist of technology: “If you believe technology is the answer to everything that plagues higher education, you probably don’t understand technology or higher education.” “The New Education” provides strong examples of successful academic innovations.

https://www.washingtonpost.com/outlook/revolutionizing-the-university-for-the-digital-era/2017/09/01/c82386a2-6740-11e7-8eb5-cbccc2e7bfbf_story.html

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Schools launch online learning options

Tue, 2017-09-12 17:15

By Carol Paur, Lake Geneva News
The Lake Geneva school district is expanding its online options for students in the middle schools and Badger high school. Introduced in May, the district is offering what it calls Lake Geneva Online Learning Options (LGOLO) as another choice for their students. These courses will supplement, not take over classroom instruction. “This came out of a need to expand course selections,” said Russ Tronsen, Badger High School principal. “This will be a potential tool for us.”

http://www.lakegenevanews.net/news/schools-launch-online-learning-options/article_12e58ab4-9a1f-5768-b673-41782b261692.html

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The Rise of the Online Exam Proctor

Tue, 2017-09-12 17:10

By Cait Etherington, e-learning Inside

It’s a fact: Sometimes students cheat on exams. This is why exam proctors remain necessary at all levels of the education system. In most cases proctors are anonymous individuals who pass out exams and then pace up and down watching you while you write. The proctor is also the person who typically says time is up and retrieves your exam…whether or not you’ve completed it. In short, they are the eyes and ears of the education system in testing situations, but the days of human proctors may be numbered.

https://news.elearninginside.com/the-rise-of-the-online-exam-proctor/

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Online university seeks students; UA System’s eVersity reaching Arkansans without degrees

Tue, 2017-09-12 17:04

By Aziza Musa, Arkansas Online

As of late, Michael Moore is measuring progress in what has been his main task for the past four years: building a stand-alone, online-only university for the system. That school, eVersity, first opened to students in September 2015, taking aim at the state’s estimated 213,987 adult learners who started college but never finished and promising them accessibility and affordability. Now — two years in — Moore said he would give everything but enrollment an A grade. Enrollment — on which eVersity will soon rely exclusively for revenue — remains its biggest challenge and would earn a B-minus, he said, adding that the university has about 650 students, just short of the university’s anticipated mark of 1,000. “We’re a few months behind that,” he said. “One of the lessons we learned early on that I think caught all of us off guard was that so many of our students are bringing to us so many credit hours that what we needed early on in the first few months were more upper-division courses, and we played a little catch-up trying to get those upper-division courses.”

http://www.arkansasonline.com/news/2017/sep/04/online-university-seeks-students-201709/?f=news

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Why Digital Technology Is to Higher Ed What Electricity Was to Manufacturing: The next 50 years

Tue, 2017-09-12 17:03

By Joshua Kim, Inside Higher Ed

We might be in for a similar 50 year transition as we in higher ed figure out how to take advantage of all the affordances of digital technologies. An interesting thought experiment to run is to ask if starting from scratch, would we design our colleges and universities the same way as they are now? Giving ourselves the freedom to think about redesigning our institutions from a clean slate may yield some interesting changes. Given our shift in understanding of the critical role of active learning, would we continue to build tiered lectured halls with fixed seats? How might we change the organization of our classrooms, labs, libraries, and residential facilities to encourage project based and experiential learning? If we started from the premise of abundant information available on ubiquitous mobile screens, how might we design our physical environments to encourage collaboration and social learning?

https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/technology-and-learning/why-digital-technology-higher-ed-what-electricity-was-manufacturing

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