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Engineering Education
Updated: 21 hours 13 min ago

First-ever online law program starts at Syracuse University

Mon, 2019-01-21 16:08

by WSYR

Law is the chosen field for nearly three dozen people in Syracuse University’s newest law school class that started their program this week. The university is offering a law degree program online– the first ever full interactive law program approved by the American Bar Association. “I live within two miles of five law schools in Chicago, all of which have part-time programs, but I really am comfortable with this type of learning,” said Ray Scannell, an online law student through SU. Educators say the program is just as rigorous as if the students came to Dineen Hall everyday.

https://www.localsyr.com/news/local-news/first-ever-online-law-program-starts-at-syracuse-university/1696438243

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How to make online learning work for you

Mon, 2019-01-21 16:05

by Valley Star

Many students juggle work and family, according to the National Center for Education Statistics, which found that 62 percent of students work full- or part-time, and 29 percent have at least one dependent. Today’s college students are just as likely to be moms and dads themselves, full-time and part-time employees or members of the U.S. armed forces. Needing flexibility and variety in course offerings, more students are turning to online learning to design a path that fits their lifestyle. As a result, online learning is seeing significant growth. A recent study found more than 6 million students take online courses across the U.S., and that number continues to rise. For example, at ASU Online, programs have grown significantly, with a 60 percent increase in freshman enrollment since fall 2016 to more than 35,000 students in over 175 undergraduate and graduate degree programs.

https://www.valleymorningstar.com/online_features/money_and_finance/how-to-make-online-learning-work-for-you/article_9710c03a-7d8e-597e-aa0d-e855ca16a96c.html

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Can MOOCs Predict the Future of Online Education?

Mon, 2019-01-21 16:02

by JONATHAN SHAW, Harvard Magazine

Anant Agarwal agrees that it is much too soon to write off online education on the basis of an evaluation of MOOCs alone. “Edx remains committed to developing a sustainable business model, and making sure that we are able to reimagine education both in quality and scale for everybody, but it is going to take time,” he says. “Seven years in the grand scheme of things is a very short period of time to assess whether the technology has had a big impact” (although 40 million learners reached in every country in the world is a good start). “Once we get sustainable, and the non-profit begins generating a surplus, we can invest in quality and in reaching people we would not otherwise have reached.” Right now, he says, “I think we are just barely scratching the surface.”

https://harvardmagazine.com/2019/01/mooc

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With some of the world’s top-ranking universities located in the region, can American AI outsmart the rest of the world?

Sun, 2019-01-20 16:23

Current

Across North and South America, automation is transforming the nature of work and is set to replace around a third of roles. Yet at the same time, AI is generating new opportunities and job prospects. To ensure long-term economic success, many experts believe nurturing the AI talent pipeline will be essential. But how do the universities across the region fare?

https://www.distrelec.de/current/en/robotics/americas-innovative-universities-ai-robotics/

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Purdue U’s access to adult learners

Sun, 2019-01-20 16:14

By Hallie Busta , Education Dive
By the time the ink was dry on Purdue University’s acquisition of for-profit Kaplan University, the higher ed sector was entrenched in two distinct camps: those who thought the deal unfairly let a for-profit college operate under the guise of a nonprofit, and those who argued the move was critical for the public land-grant university to compete in the growing online education realm. For $1, Purdue got Kaplan’s some 30,000 students and 2,500 instructors, forming the basis of its online college, Purdue University Global. The deal’s low price also obligates the university to share revenue from the new entity with Kaplan Higher Education, which handles several of its administrative functions, including admissions support, financial aid, marketing and advertising.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/how-purdue-global-is-expanding-purdue-us-access-to-adult-learners/545554/

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Americans want to regulate AI but don’t trust anyone to do it

Sun, 2019-01-20 16:13

by Karen Hao, MIT Technology Review

Americans have mixed support for the continued development of AI and overwhelmingly agree that it should be regulated, according to a new study from the Center for the Governance of AI and Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute. These are important lessons for policymakers and technologists to consider in the discussion on how best to advance and regulate AI, says Allan Dafoe, director of the center and coauthor of the report. “There isn’t currently a consensus in favor of developing advanced AI, or that it’s going to be good for humanity,” he says. “That kind of perception could lead to the development of AI being perceived as illegitimate or cause political backlashes against the development of AI.”

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/612734/americans-want-to-regulate-ai-but-dont-trust-anyone-to-do-it/

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3 Higher Ed Predictions for 2019

Sun, 2019-01-20 16:11

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

Predictions abound at the beginning of a new year, and Encoura’s Eduventures chief research officer, Richard Garrett, has weighed in with three of his own for 2019. First, Garrett said he expects “at least five more R1 universities” to introduce low-priced online master’s degrees, akin to Georgia Tech’s master’s in analytics ($9,900) or the University of Texas at Austin’s master’s in computer science ($10,000). While these programs traditionally have emphasized the MBA, data science and cybersecurity, the new breed of graduate study will focus on fields such as healthcare management and accounting, he said. These programs will be characterized by the “same admission standards, same rigor, same faculty,” but the schools will emphasize “mass enrollment at a low price.”

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2019/01/10/3-higher-ed-predictions-for-2019.aspx

 

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Online classes cost reduced to same as on-campus classes

Sun, 2019-01-20 16:05

Ryan Stark, Daily Helmsman
The price of online courses through the University of Memphis have been reduced to become the same price as on-campus courses. Previously, online courses at the UofM required an additional tuition premium that made them more expensive than on-campus courses. The Board of Trustees has approved a proposal to reduce the price of online classes equal to on-campus classes. “What this means for UofM students is that regardless of what modality they elect to take their classes in, be it traditional, on-the-ground courses or online courses, the tuition rate will be the same,” said Raajkumar Kurapati, the Chief Financial Officer at the UofM. “Students can mix and match classes (online or on-ground) to fit their needs and not have to pay an additional tuition premium.”

http://www.dailyhelmsman.com/news/online-classes-cost-reduced-to-same-as-on-campus-classes/article_bece8c08-1461-11e9-85d7-8fa01ad4df95.html

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DeVos Announces More Support for College Online Learning

Sun, 2019-01-20 16:02

By Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside
Betsy DeVos, the Secretary of Education, has made one thing clear from the beginning of her tenure: She’s a huge supporter of college online learning. This week she continued to follow through on her promise to support the cause. In an announcement on January 7, DeVos said she would change the rules for what counts as a course at the postsecondary level and as a result, extend federal funds to a wider range of postsecondary providers. The announcement is good news for certain institutions that have clashed with federal regulators in the past over what counts as a course, but not everyone is happy about DeVos’s latest announcements.

https://news.elearninginside.com/devos-announces-more-support-for-college-online-learning/

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6 Best Practices for Managing an Online Educational Infrastructure

Sat, 2019-01-19 16:25

Dark Reading
Universities must keep pace with rapidly changing technology to help thwart malicious hacking attempts and protect student information.    Retailers, healthcare providers, and social media platforms may be the first organizations that come to mind regarding consumer data security. However, other organizations — including institutions of higher education — are also tasked with the responsibility of protecting their customers’ sensitive and valuable personal information from cybercriminals. Because increasing numbers of students opt for some level of distance learning, today’s institutions of higher education are collecting vast amounts of virtual data. And as in any industry, universities must keep pace with rapidly changing technology to help thwart malicious hacking attempts and protect student information. This is especially important for universities that serve primarily nontraditional students — for example, adults taking online classes.

https://www.darkreading.com/endpoint/privacy/6-best-practices-for-managing-an-online-educational-infrastructure/a/d-id/1333552

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Negotiators for accreditation rulemaking have deep stakes in online, alternative education

Sat, 2019-01-19 16:20

By Natalie Schwartz, Education Dive
The U.S. Education Department has released the list of industry representatives who are set to participate in the negotiated rulemaking session on college accreditation scheduled to begin later this month. The diverse group of stakeholders represents students, accreditors and various types of higher education institutions, including the University of Alaska, the parent company of for-profits Strayer University and Capella University, Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) and Brigham Young University.  The agency has indicated the sessions will tackle a range of issues, including the definition of the credit hour, accreditor oversight and requirements for teacher-student interaction in online programs. The stakeholders will have until the end of March to come to an agreement about the proposed regulatory overhaul.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/negotiators-for-accreditation-rulemaking-have-strong-stakes-in-online-alte/545545/

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The Language of MOOCs

Sat, 2019-01-19 16:14

By Roberto Rey Agudo, Inside Higher Ed

Can providers of massive open online courses achieve their goal of educating the most possible people when their offerings are overwhelmingly in English? No, Roberto Rey Agudo argues. Much has been made of the global nature of MOOCs, and the fact that these courses are enabling students from many countries to learn together. Coursera has 181 partners in 27 countries; edX has 130 partners worldwide. In spite of their international reach, English is the language of instruction for over 80 percent of their courses. In contrast, English makes up about 50 percent of internet content, and English speakers 30 percent of the total users. Can edX and Coursera be global platforms and be functionally monolingual?

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/views/2019/01/09/moocs-overwhelming-dependence-english-limits-their-impact-opinion

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AI will displace 40 percent of world’s workers as soon as 2035, leading expert warns

Sat, 2019-01-19 16:10

By Christopher Carbone, Fox News

Forty percent of the world’s jobs could be done by machines in as soon as 15 years, according to a top expert on artificial intelligence (AI). Kai Fu Lee, a pioneer in AI who also works in venture capital in China, told “60 Minutes” that a wide range of blue-collar and white-collar jobs will be overtaken by machines in the next two decades. “AI will increasingly replace repetitive jobs, not just for blue-collar work, but a lot of white-collar work,” Lee, who has worked for Apple and Google, told CBS. “Chauffeurs, truck drivers, anyone who does driving for a living — their jobs will be disrupted more in the 15 to 25-year time frame.” The venture capitalist, who wrote a book about AI last year, said in the show that “many jobs that seem a little bit complex – chef, waiter, a lot of things – will become automated.”

https://www.foxnews.com/tech/ai-will-displace-40-percent-of-worlds-workers-as-soon-as-2035-leading-expert-warns

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Americans want to regulate AI but don’t trust anyone to do it

Sat, 2019-01-19 16:07

by Karen Hao, MIT Technology Review

Americans have mixed support for the continued development of AI and overwhelmingly agree that it should be regulated, according to a new study from the Center for the Governance of AI and Oxford University’s Future of Humanity Institute. These are important lessons for policymakers and technologists to consider in the discussion on how best to advance and regulate AI, says Allan Dafoe, director of the center and coauthor of the report. “There isn’t currently a consensus in favor of developing advanced AI, or that it’s going to be good for humanity,” he says. “That kind of perception could lead to the development of AI being perceived as illegitimate or cause political backlashes against the development of AI.”

https://www.technologyreview.com/s/612734/americans-want-to-regulate-ai-but-dont-trust-anyone-to-do-it/

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Purdue U’s access to adult learners

Sat, 2019-01-19 16:02

By Hallie Busta , Education Dive
By the time the ink was dry on Purdue University’s acquisition of for-profit Kaplan University, the higher ed sector was entrenched in two distinct camps: those who thought the deal unfairly let a for-profit college operate under the guise of a nonprofit, and those who argued the move was critical for the public land-grant university to compete in the growing online education realm. For $1, Purdue got Kaplan’s some 30,000 students and 2,500 instructors, forming the basis of its online college, Purdue University Global. The deal’s low price also obligates the university to share revenue from the new entity with Kaplan Higher Education, which handles several of its administrative functions, including admissions support, financial aid, marketing and advertising.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/how-purdue-global-is-expanding-purdue-us-access-to-adult-learners/545554/

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Purdue’s Online Strategy, Beyond ‘Global’

Fri, 2019-01-18 16:25

by Mark Lieberman, Inside Higher Ed

Purdue last month established a central administrative office, Purdue Online, to act as an online program manager of sorts for the institution’s three on-ground campuses as well as Purdue Global, which now exists as a public benefit corporation and does not receive state funding.  Representatives of the original Purdue campuses have been meeting regularly with instructors and deans at Purdue Global, sharing ideas and identifying areas of potential academic collaboration while drawing lines between the two entities’ focus areas and target audiences. Purdue administrators have also been paying close attention to high-profile competitors on the online landscape, including Arizona State University, which administrators cite as a model for their ambitions.

http://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/01/09/purdue-prepares-online-expansion-support-newly-acquired-profit

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How Can Online Instructors Get Students to Talk to Each Other?

Fri, 2019-01-18 16:24

By Bonni Stachowiak, EdSurge

It can be a delicate balance to try to not overwhelm students by the quantity of educational technology we use in a class, while still keeping things interesting through the element of surprise. The easier a tool is to use, the more likely students will feel comfortable engaging with each other. As an example of the kind of tool that is easy to use, I was recently introduced to a brainstorming tool called Tricider (thank you Michelle Pacansky-Brock, faculty mentor for digital innovation at California Community Colleges). Tricider has us identify what crowdsourced decision we want to make, or what type of brainstorming we’d like to spark, and we are up and running. Students can add ideas, pros and cons, and vote on items. The instructor can decide if you want to let anyone who has the link be able to collaborate, protect your ideas with a password, or require people to set up accounts before they can engage.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2019-01-09-how-can-online-instructors-get-students-to-talk-to-each-other

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(Early) Signs of (Modest) Online Saturation

Fri, 2019-01-18 16:15

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed
Bold pronouncements about trends in the fast-moving, and somewhat data-poor, landscape of online learning should be approached with great skepticism — which is why this isn’t one. What it is is a high-level view of some data in an analysis published last month by Public Insight, which collects and makes available public data in accessible formats. The blog post by the company’s CEO, Dan Quigg, carried the provocative title of “Has Distance Education Hit Its Peak?” — a question inspired by federal data showing that the proportion of all academic programs that were offered via distance education declined to 10.5 percent in 2016 from 10.8 percent in 2017. It was the first such decline since the federal government’s main higher education database, the Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, began collecting data on online education in 2013.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2019/01/09/are-we-seeing-early-signs-saturation-online-academic-programs

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Negotiators for accreditation rulemaking have deep stakes in online, alternative education

Fri, 2019-01-18 16:10

By Natalie Schwartz, Education Dive
The U.S. Education Department has released the list of industry representatives who are set to participate in the negotiated rulemaking session on college accreditation scheduled to begin later this month. The diverse group of stakeholders represents students, accreditors and various types of higher education institutions, including the University of Alaska, the parent company of for-profits Strayer University and Capella University, Southern New Hampshire University (SNHU) and Brigham Young University.  The agency has indicated the sessions will tackle a range of issues, including the definition of the credit hour, accreditor oversight and requirements for teacher-student interaction in online programs. The stakeholders will have until the end of March to come to an agreement about the proposed regulatory overhaul.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/negotiators-for-accreditation-rulemaking-have-strong-stakes-in-online-alte/545545/

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From campus to computer: How one school is transforming online education

Fri, 2019-01-18 16:05

Study International

What drives international students to choose the digital screen over the global campus? Many may assume it’s the financial benefit of staying put. Remaining in your home country saves you money on flights, as well as the hefty costs attached to securing accommodation. Others disagree, claiming that technology is the future and that soon, the majority higher education courses will be delivered in a virtual format without the need for physical classroom presence. To address this shift in learning styles, Harvard Business School (HBS) in the US decided to alter the title of their online platform to raise awareness of the trend.

https://www.studyinternational.com/news/from-campus-to-computer-how-one-school-is-transforming-online-education/

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