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Engineering Education
Updated: 20 hours 21 min ago

The Evolving Transactional Nature of Credentialing: Alternative Credentials Today

Thu, 2018-09-20 17:22

by Jonathan Finkelstein , the Evolllution

As the distinction between learning at colleges, universities and workplaces continues to erode, credentials are supplanting the traditional role of the degree in terms of skills verification. Unlike the degree, credentials offer individuals the opportunity to showcase all aspects of “life-wide” learning, providing substantially more detailed insight into a person’s transferable abilities for both the classroom and the workforce. In Part One of this two-part interview, Jonathan Finkelstein discusses traditional postsecondary approaches to credentialing, and argues that the increasingly transactional nature of credentials justifies a more granular approach to skills verification.

 

The Evolving Transactional Nature of Credentialing: Alternative Credentials Today

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Many College Courses Are Either Overloaded or Underfilled. That May Be Hurting Retention.

Thu, 2018-09-20 17:15

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Crafting an efficient schedule of college course offerings means solving a complex puzzle. And more colleges these days are turning to algorithms to help reduce the number of classes that are either overloaded or full of empty seats. A study out last week of about 200 colleges found that many course schedules are “unbalanced,” with 45 percent of courses analyzed filled to less than 70 percent capacity and 23 percent of courses classified as “overloaded,” meaning more than 95 percent full. That inefficiency is having an impact on retention, the study found. The greater the inefficiency of the course catalog, the lower the graduation rate at the institutions analyzed.  But even if an AI system can show college leaders where they need to create more courses, there’s still a bigger problem: The college may not have the resources to hire additional faculty to create those sections.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-09-11-many-college-courses-are-either-overloaded-or-underfilled-that-may-be-hurting-retention

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The Work You Want to Do After Graduation

Thu, 2018-09-20 17:05

by Michael S. Roth, President, Wesleyan
Many readers of this blog know that I have championed pragmatic liberal learning—a broad education that combines skills and contextual understanding to provide a resource for life “beyond the university.” Students at Wesleyan hear me repeat the great line of former Wesleyan president Victor Butterfield: “If these turn out to be the best four years of your lives, then we have failed you.” Wesleyans learn to translate liberal learning into purposeful work after graduation.

http://roth.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2018/09/11/the-work-you-want-to-do-after-graduation/

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Trustee: U Wyoming needs more distance learning options – Wyoming News Exchange

Thu, 2018-09-20 17:02

Rock Springs resident Laura Schmid-Pizzato, who was appointed to the University of Wyoming Board of Trustees on Tuesday, told the Laramie Boomerang she’s largely interested in increasing access to UW education for citizens throughout the state.  part-time lecturer at Western Wyoming Community College, Schmid-Pizzato said she thinks the university should be able to increase course offering to residents around Wyoming who aren’t able to relocate to Laramie. “I want to make sure they have the opportunity for higher education,” she said. “I taught online classes and there’s lots of different ways to provide the education.”

https://www.gillettenewsrecord.com/news/wyoming/article_7ce8363d-2472-5621-a4a2-3f18c25ed434.html

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University students want profs to consider free options over textbooks

Thu, 2018-09-20 17:01

by Kate Bueckert, CBC

The Ontario Undergraduate Student Alliance (OUSA) has relaunched it’s #TextbookBroke campaign to highlight the high cost of textbooks and urge professors to choose free alternatives. The group initially launched the campaign in January, and during it, students shared stories about how not being able to afford textbooks impacted their education. “We saw students were spending about an average of $500 on textbooks,” said Shannon Kelly, vice president of student affairs for the Wilfrid Laurier University Students’ Union and vice president of finance for OUSA. “Some students had to pick and choose between what textbooks they felt that they actually needed and could afford.”

https://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/kitchener-waterloo/university-waterloo-wilfrid-laurier-textbook-broke-free-1.4817656

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Integrating Makerspaces Throughout the Curriculum

Wed, 2018-09-19 17:26

By Joshua Bolkan, THE Journal
The makerspace isn’t just a fixed space where kids come and go to complete busywork. It’s an extension of a well-established approach to educating students that has applications and deep implications across disciplines. As makerspaces start to pop up in schools across the country, some educators, particularly those teaching non-STEM subjects, may be wondering what exactly they’re supposed to do with them. Policymakers and administrators, meanwhile, want to make sure the spaces and resources are well utilized and are providing as much educational bang for the buck as possible. Luckily, integrating makerspaces throughout the curriculum is fairly easy with the right frame of mind.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/09/04/integrating-makerspaces-throughout-the-curriculum.aspx

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College students predicted to fall by more than 15% after the year 2025

Wed, 2018-09-19 17:20

by Jill Barshay, Hechinger Report

Only a handful of states, colored in blue, are predicted to see an increase in the number of students attending regional four-year colleges and universities between 2012 and 2029. The rest will see declines in students. In the red-colored states, the drop in students will exceed 15%. The dots represent large metropolitan areas. These urban college markets, such as San Diego, may diverge from their state’s or region’s trends. Nathan D. Grawe, Carleton College.  What does the declining birthrate mean for colleges and universities and the students who hope to get a college degree a decade from now? The answer depends on where you live in the United States and how selective the college is. For most colleges and universities, the outlook is grim. But that could be a good thing for their future students.

 

College students predicted to fall by more than 15% after the year 2025

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How Audio Feedback Via Social Media Can Drive Engagement and Enhance Instruction

Wed, 2018-09-19 17:15

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

While online learning excels in certain areas, it chronically suffers in others. Among the latter, student engagement, personal connection, and student-teacher interaction have been areas of focus for educators and researchers practically since the birth of the digital learning environment. Engagement in all learning environments, furthermore, is a topic of ongoing concern. A recent study conducted by Yueting Xu, a researcher at the School of English and Education, Guangdong University of Foreign Studies in Guanghzhou, China, purports to have found a piece of the puzzle. An instructor of a university level English language course decided that, instead of providing written feedback, she would use a popular social media platform WeChat to record her comments on student assignments verbally.

How Audio Feedback Via Social Media Can Drive Engagement and Enhance Instruction

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The Evolving Transactional Nature of Credentialing: Alternative Credentials Today

Wed, 2018-09-19 17:08

 

by Jonathan Finkelstein , the Evolllution

As the distinction between learning at colleges, universities and workplaces continues to erode, credentials are supplanting the traditional role of the degree in terms of skills verification. Unlike the degree, credentials offer individuals the opportunity to showcase all aspects of “life-wide” learning, providing substantially more detailed insight into a person’s transferable abilities for both the classroom and the workforce. In Part One of this two-part interview, Jonathan Finkelstein discusses traditional postsecondary approaches to credentialing, and argues that the increasingly transactional nature of credentials justifies a more granular approach to skills verification.

The Evolving Transactional Nature of Credentialing: Alternative Credentials Today

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Adjunct instructors can cause lower grades for students

Wed, 2018-09-19 17:03

by James Paterson, Education Dive
Community colleges rely heavily on adjunct professors, but new research suggests that the part-time instructors may adversely affect student performance at two-year institutions, particularly in STEM and health field courses. Research conducted by Di Xu, an assistant professor of educational policy at the University of California, Irvine, shows that while students having an adjunct instructor got better grades in introductory courses, they were more likely to drop subsequent courses in the field of study or get, on average, 4% lower grades than if they were instructed by a full-time faculty member. The research notes that the use of adjuncts is greatest at community colleges, which play “a critical role in addressing the national equity agenda by disproportionately serving underrepresented groups.”

https://www.educationdive.com/news/adjunct-instructors-can-cause-lower-grades-for-students/532033/

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Many College Courses Are Either Overloaded or Underfilled. That May Be Hurting Retention.

Wed, 2018-09-19 17:03

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Crafting an efficient schedule of college course offerings means solving a complex puzzle. And more colleges these days are turning to algorithms to help reduce the number of classes that are either overloaded or full of empty seats. A study out last week of about 200 colleges found that many course schedules are “unbalanced,” with 45 percent of courses analyzed filled to less than 70 percent capacity and 23 percent of courses classified as “overloaded,” meaning more than 95 percent full. That inefficiency is having an impact on retention, the study found. The greater the inefficiency of the course catalog, the lower the graduation rate at the institutions analyzed.  But even if an AI system can show college leaders where they need to create more courses, there’s still a bigger problem: The college may not have the resources to hire additional faculty to create those sections.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-09-11-many-college-courses-are-either-overloaded-or-underfilled-that-may-be-hurting-retention

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Expanded UF Online partnership will provide education benefits to more than 80,000 hourly Disney employees nationwide

Tue, 2018-09-18 17:20

by University of Florida

University of Florida Online is once again partnering with a leading employer – The Walt Disney Company – to expand access to high quality online bachelor’s degrees. Disney Aspire, recently launched by The Walt Disney Company, is a comprehensive education benefits program focused on the career development of Disney’s workforce. With the Disney Aspire initiative, more than 80,000 full-time and part-time hourly employees, who have more than 90 days of service, will be eligible to have 100 percent of their tuition, required textbooks and course materials, plus application and program fees paid up front by the company. As part of this relationship, Disney employees may apply to one of several fully online bachelor’s degrees – the Bachelor of Arts or Bachelor of Science in business administration from the Warrington College of Business; the Bachelor of Science in sport management from the College of Health and Human Performance; and the Bachelor of Science in public relations, and the Bachelor of Science in telecommunication from the College of Journalism and Communications. If granted admission by the University of Florida, Disney cast members could begin UF Online classes in January 2019 as part of the University’s spring semester. Disney employees and Cast Members can learn more and sign up at aspire.disney.com.

http://news.ufl.edu/articles/2018/09/expanded-uf-online-partnership-will-provide-education-benefits-to-more-than-80000-hourly-disney-employees-nationwide.php

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Close the distance

Tue, 2018-09-18 17:15

by Kathleen Golden, Smart Brief

Online courses give learners and instructors flexible class options, but they also pose difficulties that instructors must overcome. Research shows that online students crave more interactions with their peers and instructors. Unfortunately, it’s challenging to forge meaningful connections with people in the course through email or text-driven forums alone. The distance between students and their instructor often creates a divide — one that’s been proven to affect learning outcomes as well as student satisfaction. Video assessment can help online teachers bridge this divide. Video assessment refers to instructors evaluating recordings of students completing a task, demonstrating a skill or any other activity that showcases their knowledge.

http://www.smartbrief.com/original/2018/09/close-distance

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11 ways presidents can engage students with social media

Tue, 2018-09-18 17:10

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampus News
MSI presidents–and higher-ed presidents in general–can greatly benefit from a few key social media practices.  Only slightly more than one-third (36 percent) of presidents at minority-serving institutions (MSIs) use Twitter, compared to 55 percent of all college and university presidents–and they’re missing out on a big opportunity, according to new research. Of that MSI group, most don’t post or tweet regularly, meaning they miss chances to connect with current and prospective students, as well as stakeholders and supporters, according to Presidential Engagement of Students at Minority Serving Institutions, which gauges how MSI leaders can use social media to connect with and engage students. The report comes from the Penn Center for Minority Serving Institutions, and its leader profiles and social media suggestions aren’t necessarily limited to MSI presidents.

11 ways presidents can engage students with social media

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Is college the right, or only, path to a good-paying job?

Tue, 2018-09-18 17:05

by Ramona Schindelheim, Working Nation

It is clear colleges and universities will be facing some major headwinds unless they rethink their roles in preparing students for the workforce, according to one respected expert on higher education. “There’s a rising demand for talent, and colleges and universities are a major engine of talent production in this country. I continue to argue that they will be for the foreseeable future, but their position is much more precarious than it was a few years ago,” according to Jamie Merisotis, the President and CEO of the Lumina Foundation, a foundation whose mission is to make post-high school learning opportunities available to all.

Is college the right, or only, path to a good-paying job?

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College students predicted to fall by more than 15% after the year 2025

Tue, 2018-09-18 17:03

by Jill Barshay, Hechinger Report

Only a handful of states, colored in blue, are predicted to see an increase in the number of students attending regional four-year colleges and universities between 2012 and 2029. The rest will see declines in students. In the red-colored states, the drop in students will exceed 15%. The dots represent large metropolitan areas. These urban college markets, such as San Diego, may diverge from their state’s or region’s trends. Nathan D. Grawe, Carleton College.  What does the declining birthrate mean for colleges and universities and the students who hope to get a college degree a decade from now? The answer depends on where you live in the United States and how selective the college is. For most colleges and universities, the outlook is grim. But that could be a good thing for their future students.

 

But student demand is expected to grow for the nation’s most elite colleges and universities between 2012 and 2029. The dots represent large metropolitan areas, which sometimes diverge from their state’s growth forecasts. Nathan D. Grawe, Carleton College

Nathan Grawe, an economist at Carleton College in Minnesota, predicts that the college-going population will drop by 15 percent between 2025 and 2029 and continue to decline by another percentage point or two thereafter.

College students predicted to fall by more than 15% after the year 2025

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WHAT IS THE FUTURE OF GAMIFICATION? THE GROWTH ENGINEERING REPORT

Mon, 2018-09-17 17:35

The findings of this report can be arranged into three main categories:

  1. Gamification will evolve. If our understanding of gamification doesn’t evolve with it, it will become outdated. An outdated understanding of its capabilities will limit its potential and we mustn’t let this happen.
  2. The surge in technological innovation will lead to an explosion in new expressions of gamification.
    Further academic research into gamification is essential to its evolution. It will open up new ways to apply the principles of gamification and provide scientific rigour to gamification practice.
  3. This report emphasises the potential of gamification to transform behaviour, business and even society.

Here’s what we have in store…

http://www.elearninglearning.com/edition/weekly-wage-and-hour-training-corporate-elearning-2018-09-01

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Why there is so much more to eLearning than just Cost Reduction

Mon, 2018-09-17 17:20

by Amit Garg, Upside Learning

eLearning has myriad benefits. Studies have shown that eLearning can reduce the overall training time by as much as 40% to 60%. This can help businesses cut down on the assorted expenses and experience a rise in productivity and in turn profitability. Besides the cost part, eLearning also offers several other paybacks for organizations. It provides easier tracking and record keeping, which means L&D can gauge the progress of learners, examine their weak areas and plan future courses based on this analysis. Most importantly, eLearning offers the flexibility of anytime, anywhere training, considering today’s workforce is a busy lot and may not have the time to take training sessions tethered to workstations or training bays. Another advantage is that in a dynamic market where time matters the most, eLearning provides quicker delivery cycles as compared to traditional classroom-based instruction. Learners can set their own pace of learning and can focus on specific elements of the program while skipping what they already know.

http://www.elearninglearning.com/edition/weekly-wage-and-hour-training-corporate-elearning-2018-09-01

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AI will create $13 trillion in value by 2030

Mon, 2018-09-17 17:14

by Liam Tung, ZD Net

McKinsey’s latest forecast of AI’s impact on the global economy is that it will have generated $13 trillion in economic activity across the world by 2030, despite causing upheaval for many people. The company expects AI will add about 1.2 percent of additional GDP growth per year through to 2030, which is much higher than the steam engine’s boost to human productivity of 0.3 percent per year between 1850 and 1910, and twice the impact IT had in the 2000s. The company is expecting AI’s impact on growth to accelerate as the world approaches 2030 and that companies that move first on the technology will capture most of the benefits at the expense of companies that fail to adopt them. The company estimates that 14 percent of the world’s workers will need to change occupations and move to new sectors or different geographies.

https://www.zdnet.com/article/mckinsey-ai-will-create-13-trillion-in-value-by-2013/

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Protecting Your Students’ Privacy on Social Media

Mon, 2018-09-17 17:07

By Common Sense Education

Social media can pose risks to students’ privacy, but these risks can be managed with informed, intentional use. There’s also a huge upside: Teachers can use social media to share best practices, provide an authentic audience for students’ work, cultivate and model digital citizenship among their students and build more connected school communities.

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/09/10/protecting-your-students-privacy-on-social-media.aspx

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