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5 things every college must know about cloud computing

News & Thoughts - Tue, 2018-07-17 17:10

BY KEITH RAJECKI, eCampus News

Many universities have been relatively slow to embrace the cloud for a few simple reasons. First, because it’s not always cheap or easy to overhaul IT systems. And second, because cloud represents a fundamental technological change and perceived challenges that many organizations do not feel they have the expertise, bandwidth, or resources to address.

Fortunately, there are ways around these challenges, and it starts by remembering that cloud computing is part of a journey to a modern campus—not the ultimate destination. What’s needed is a strategic approach that combines on-premise services with advanced cloud solutions.

5 things every college must know about cloud computing

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STRAIGHTERLINE LAUNCHES NEW PARTNERSHIP WITH NEW ENGLAND COLLEGE

News & Thoughts - Tue, 2018-07-17 17:05

byBeth Dumbauld, Straighter Line

StraighterLine, the student success and college readiness company, and the New Hampshire-based New England College have partnered to offer students an accelerated associate degree pathway program. New England College will use more than 20 of StraighterLine’s online general education credits for this new program, helping create an affordable and flexible option for students that costs less than $10,000. Offered 100% online, this accelerated program is offered thought the college’s School of Graduate and Professional Studies and provides students an opportunity to earn an Associate of Arts in Professional Studies in as little as 15 months. Interested students will start by successfully completing a free credit-bearing course. Once enrolled, remaining tuition is $9,900 for the entire 60-credit program and financial aid is available. Classes start August 20, 2018.

https://www.straighterline.com/press/straighterline-launches-new-partnership-new-england-college-offer-new-englands-affordable-associate-degree/

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Accreditor clears path for $1.9 billion Strayer-Capella merger

News & Thoughts - Tue, 2018-07-17 17:02

by Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive
The merger between Capella University’s parent company, Capella Education Company, and Strayer Education Inc., the parent company of Strayer University, has been approved by the Higher Learning Commission and is expected to close on or before Aug. 1. The resulting company will be named Strategic Education Inc., according to a July 9 Security Exchange Commission filing.  The $1.9 billion deal will create one of the largest for-profit companies in the country, serving roughly 80,000 students between them. The two institutions will continue to operate as “independent and separately accredited institutions.”  Strayer shareholders will own 52% of the combined stock and Capella shareholders will own 48%.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/accreditor-clears-path-for-19-billion-strayer-capella-merger/527421/

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Lies, Damned Lies and Rankings

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-07-16 17:25

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed
Temple reveals that scandal over false information submitted for rankings of its online M.B.A. was much broader than earlier known. Dean, found to have dismantled system for checking accuracy of data, is ousted. Temple University on Monday announced that its business school had submitted false data for years for rankings purposes. The university said that it had asked Moshe Porat, dean of the business school, to resign, saying that he had dismantled the business school’s system for verifying the accuracy of data being submitted for rankings. An outside review found that the employee responsible for preparing the data said he did so at the dean’s direction, although Porat denied this to the outside investigator.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/10/temple-ousts-business-dean-after-report-finds-online-mba-program-years-submitted

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Who shoulders most of nation’s ~$1.5 trillion in student debt? Women

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-07-16 17:21

by CBS News
Women owe about $890 billion of the country’s $1.48 trillion student loan debt, nearly double the $490 billion owed by men, placing them at a financial disadvantage as they begin their careers, according to a recently released report from the American Association of University Women (AAUW). The study, which analyzed data from the U.S. Department Education from the 2015-2016 school year, also found that women graduating with bachelor’s degree owe on average $2,700 more in student loans than men do. Women, who account for 56 percent of enrolled college students, are far more likely than men to graduate owing money — 71 percent for female grads vs. 66 percent for male grads, according to the AAUW.

https://www.universitybusiness.com/news/who-shoulders-most-nations-14-trillion-student-debt-women

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Canvas Catches, and Maybe Passes, Blackboard

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-07-16 17:15

By Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed
Canvas has unseated Blackboard Learn as the leading LMS at U.S. colleges and universities, according to new data from MindWires Consulting. In a blog post on Monday, Michael Feldstein, partner at MindWires Consulting and co-publisher of the e-Literate blog, wrote that Canvas now has 1,218 installations at U.S. institutions, compared with Blackboard’s 1,216. Although the two-figure difference may seem insignificant — and Blackboard and some of its allies say the data don’t accurately reflect the two companies’ relative reach — most analysts agree that Canvas’s ascent, largely at Blackboard’s expense, is noteworthy.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/07/10/canvas-catches-and-maybe-passes-blackboard-top-learning

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When Faculty Lines Pay for Themselves

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-07-16 17:06

By Colleen Flaherty, Inside Higher Ed

Faculty members often fear administrative efforts to “optimize” academic operations. That’s because some such efforts result in the elimination or shrinkage of programs deemed to be unsuccessful by key metrics, but worthwhile in harder-to-measure ones: the program with low numbers of majors but that delivers a large share of general education credits, for example, or that rounds out the liberal arts curriculum. Sometimes, though, optimization efforts can actually help academic departments. Case in point: Stephen F. Austin State University, which used the services of Ad Astra Information Systems to close holes in its scheduling system — and then used newfound funds from expected higher course enrollments to approve 19 additional full-time, non-tenure-track faculty lines.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/10/stephen-f-austin-optimizes-course-schedule-add-faculty-lines-paid-themselves

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Study Shows How Working Community College Students Fared

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-07-16 17:05

by Marjorie Valbrun, Inside Higher Ed

Among the key findings of the report:

  • Of the 44 percent of students who worked while enrolled in their first year of postsecondary education, 18 percent worked 35 hours or more per week, 14 percent worked between 21 and 34 hours per week, and 11 percent worked fewer than 21 hours per week.
  • Twenty percent of beginning students who worked 20 hours or fewer while enrolled in 2011-12 had attained an associate degree by 2014, compared with 10 percent of students who did not work while enrolled in their first year and 9 percent of students who worked full-time during their first year.

https://www.insidehighered.com/quicktakes/2018/07/10/study-shows-how-working-community-college-students-fared

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Lies, Damned Lies and Rankings

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-07-16 17:02

By Scott Jaschik, Inside Higher Ed
Temple reveals that scandal over false information submitted for rankings of its online M.B.A. was much broader than earlier known. Dean, found to have dismantled system for checking accuracy of data, is ousted. Temple University on Monday announced that its business school had submitted false data for years for rankings purposes. The university said that it had asked Moshe Porat, dean of the business school, to resign, saying that he had dismantled the business school’s system for verifying the accuracy of data being submitted for rankings. An outside review found that the employee responsible for preparing the data said he did so at the dean’s direction, although Porat denied this to the outside investigator.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/07/10/temple-ousts-business-dean-after-report-finds-online-mba-program-years-submitted

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A college program that ‘never ends’

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-07-15 17:25

by James Paterson, Education Dive
College that “never ends” may be the future, according to a Washington Post story describing a new University of Michigan program that offers scholarships for students to come back and take courses throughout their lives. It also describes a trend toward other online learning initiatives designed to re-educate or update workers. The program at Michigan’s Ross School of Business offers 42 courses in leadership, marketing, human resources and finance that would normally cost about $10,000 a week. Ross charges the students an up-front subscription fee to access the courses, which officials say are intended to be flexible and change with needs in the workforce and economy. In 2015-16, 40 students signed up for the program, and last year 200 of the university’s 580,000 alumni did.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/a-college-program-that-never-ends/526969/

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For refugees in Kenya, an education in hope

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-07-15 17:20

By Deirdre Fernandes, Boston Globe
The Kakuma Refugee Camp, 80 miles from anywhere in northwest Kenya, is a world apart, a holding center for thousands dispossessed by war and conflict. Opportunity knocks rarely here, but a once-obscure New Hampshire university has made it the idealistic focus of its global plans. Under a thatched-roof shed at the edge of northwest Kenya, Achayo Loum logs on to her laptop to tackle the day’s assignment: writing a college essay on counterfeiting in the fashion industry. She is one of the first participants in a program at Kakuma that will, when she completes it, make her a graduate of a school she really only knows from website photos: Southern New Hampshire University. Loum’s world has an unlikely visitor.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/07/07/education-hope/o7JpxrSdkyxzhQH4YpTYdI/story.html

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Serving and learning: MSL student takes classes while stationed in Kuwait

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-07-15 17:15

by Herald Republican

One of the features that originally drew Mike Thompson to Trine University’s Lou Holtz Master of Science in Leadership program was the flexibility of online classes. That flexibility became very important to Thompson when, halfway through the program, he was called to active duty by the U.S. Army and deployed to Kuwait. A member of the Army and Indiana National Guard for 26 years altogether, Thompson, who holds the rank of staff sergeant, has been able to continue working on his MSL while deployed, completing two classes from Camp Arifjan in Kuwait.

http://www.kpcnews.com/heraldrepublican/article_e695d617-724d-53a3-8edb-cd7a337332a3.html

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A college program that ‘never ends’

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-07-15 17:10

by James Paterson, Education Dive
College that “never ends” may be the future, according to a Washington Post story describing a new University of Michigan program that offers scholarships for students to come back and take courses throughout their lives. It also describes a trend toward other online learning initiatives designed to re-educate or update workers. The program at Michigan’s Ross School of Business offers 42 courses in leadership, marketing, human resources and finance that would normally cost about $10,000 a week. Ross charges the students an up-front subscription fee to access the courses, which officials say are intended to be flexible and change with needs in the workforce and economy. In 2015-16, 40 students signed up for the program, and last year 200 of the university’s 580,000 alumni did.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/a-college-program-that-never-ends/526969/

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For refugees in Kenya, an education in hope

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-07-15 17:06

By Deirdre Fernandes, Boston Globe
The Kakuma Refugee Camp, 80 miles from anywhere in northwest Kenya, is a world apart, a holding center for thousands dispossessed by war and conflict. Opportunity knocks rarely here, but a once-obscure New Hampshire university has made it the idealistic focus of its global plans. Under a thatched-roof shed at the edge of northwest Kenya, Achayo Loum logs on to her laptop to tackle the day’s assignment: writing a college essay on counterfeiting in the fashion industry. She is one of the first participants in a program at Kakuma that will, when she completes it, make her a graduate of a school she really only knows from website photos: Southern New Hampshire University. Loum’s world has an unlikely visitor.

https://www.bostonglobe.com/metro/2018/07/07/education-hope/o7JpxrSdkyxzhQH4YpTYdI/story.html

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2018 Best Online Schools for Students with Disabilities

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-07-15 17:02

by Guide to Online Schools
These 55 colleges represent the most disability-friendly online schools for providing the highest level of support, the widest breadth of accommodations, and the most comprehensive resources for students with disabilities. All schools on this list received a Disability-Friendly score greater than 55, receiving high marks in most, if not all, of the following categories: thoroughness of resources, Universal Design for Learning training, availability of distance learning accommodations, and variety of services provided.

 

https://www.guidetoonlineschools.com/online-schools/students-with-disabilities

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Learning these in-demand skills could add thousands of dollars to your annual salary

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-07-14 17:25

by Carmen Reinicke, CNBC

“New-collar jobs,” positions that require skills but not a bachelor’s degree, are in demand right now, according to ZipRecruiter. When Josh Hannaford saw that IBM used the phrase “no degree, no problem,” advertising for its apprenticeship program, he cried. Then, he applied. “It just blew me away that a company like IBM was recognizing that there was a whole untapped workforce out there and they were going to give us a chance,” said the 21-year-old Hannaford. So-called new-collar jobs, positions that require specific skills but not a bachelor’s degree, are in high demand, according to ZipRecruiter, an online employment marketplace. The skills gap, in which jobs stay vacant for lack of qualified applicants, has given opportunities to people like Hannaford who take the initiative to train for hotly desired skills.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/28/want-to-increase-your-salary-learn-these-key-skills.html

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When we run out of room for data, scientists want to store it in DNA

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-07-14 17:20

by Luke Dormehl, Digital Trends

The reason for this is the unimaginable pace at which we currently produce data. Each day, around 2.5 quintillion bytes of data is created, courtesy of the 3.7 billion humans who now use the internet. In the last two years alone, a mind-boggling 90 percent of the world’s data has been created. That’s where Park and fellow MIT scientist and co-founder Nathaniel Roquet enter the picture. Their startup Catalog has developed technology they believe could transform data storage as we know it; allowing, or so they claim, the entirety of the world’s data to be comfortably fit into a space the size of a coat closet. Catalog’s solution? By encoding data into DNA. That might sound like the plot of a Michael Crichton novel, but their scalable and affordable solution is serious, and has so far received $9 million in venture funding — along with the support of leading professors from Stanford and Harvard Universities.

https://www.digitaltrends.com/cool-tech/dna-data-catalog-startup/

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The tech industry leads the way in revolutionizing student loan debt

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-07-14 17:15

by JAZZY QUICK, Big Think

With the average student loan borrower owing in the $27,900—$50,000 range, it’s no wonder that national student loan debt in America is at a record high of $1.52 trillion. And to make that statistic worse, STEM-based degree programs are pumping out a considerable portion of the borrowers with debt, due to students taking out massive amounts of loans in order to compete in a saturated job market. A survey shared by CommonBond gave data that depicts how the technology industry might be the most affected the most by student loan debt. Currently, approximately 53% of workers have student loan debts, according to CommonBond, and of those borrows, 65% of them are paying off $50,000 or more in student loans.

https://bigthink.com/jazzy-quick/the-tech-industry-leads-the-way-in-revolutionizing-student-loan-debt

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Serving and learning: MSL student takes classes while stationed in Kuwait

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-07-14 17:10

by Herald Republican

One of the features that originally drew Mike Thompson to Trine University’s Lou Holtz Master of Science in Leadership program was the flexibility of online classes. That flexibility became very important to Thompson when, halfway through the program, he was called to active duty by the U.S. Army and deployed to Kuwait. A member of the Army and Indiana National Guard for 26 years altogether, Thompson, who holds the rank of staff sergeant, has been able to continue working on his MSL while deployed, completing two classes from Camp Arifjan in Kuwait.

http://www.kpcnews.com/heraldrepublican/article_e695d617-724d-53a3-8edb-cd7a337332a3.html

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Learning these in-demand skills could add thousands of dollars to your annual salary

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-07-14 17:05

by Carmen Reinicke, CNBC

“New-collar jobs,” positions that require skills but not a bachelor’s degree, are in demand right now, according to ZipRecruiter. When Josh Hannaford saw that IBM used the phrase “no degree, no problem,” advertising for its apprenticeship program, he cried. Then, he applied. “It just blew me away that a company like IBM was recognizing that there was a whole untapped workforce out there and they were going to give us a chance,” said the 21-year-old Hannaford. So-called new-collar jobs, positions that require specific skills but not a bachelor’s degree, are in high demand, according to ZipRecruiter, an online employment marketplace. The skills gap, in which jobs stay vacant for lack of qualified applicants, has given opportunities to people like Hannaford who take the initiative to train for hotly desired skills.

https://www.cnbc.com/2018/06/28/want-to-increase-your-salary-learn-these-key-skills.html

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