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How Credentials Can Help Students Prepare for Future Success

News & Thoughts - Tue, 2018-11-06 16:03

by Linda Noonan, edTech Times

MBAE launched the Credentials for Success initiative to try to help close this skills gap. The goal is to expand opportunities for students to earn industry-recognized credentials in high school, so they can enhance their employability early on. Linda says credentials should be offered at schools as an option, not an end-all be-all requirement. “This is basically another tool that schools can access, should they choose, to serve their kids, and to help get their kids future ready—regardless of what that future will hold. Whether it’s college or not,” says Linda. In Florida, where schools receive a financial incentive for each student that earns an industry-recognized credential that is tied to labor market demand, “Students who enrolled in the program have demonstrated higher GPAs, higher graduation rates, higher post-secondary enrollment rates, and students had higher placement rates in employment following high school graduation. And with industry certifications, they surpassed their peers in overall average earnings by the third year they were in the workforce.”

How Credentials Can Help Students Prepare for Future Success: Linda Noonan Discusses MBAE’s New Initiative

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Non-degree Programs May Not Serve Men and Women Equally

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:25

by Pete Musto and Dorothy Gundy, VOA

For example, 74 percent of men with a certificate but no four-year college degree were employed. By comparison, 67 percent of women with a certificate but no four-year degree were employed. In terms of pay, 46 percent of women with a credential but no four-year degree made less than $30,000 a year. The same was true for 25 percent of men, New America found. Seventeen percent of men with only a non-degree credential earned more than $75,000. Just five percent of women with similar credentials earned that much.

https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/non-degree-programs-may-not-serve-men-and-women-equally/4630745.html

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Academics Propose a ‘Blockchain University,’ Where Faculty (and Algorithms) Rule

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:20

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Experiments with blockchain in higher education are underway at multiple campuses around the country, and many researchers are looking into how to use the technology to verify and deliver credentials. Massachusetts Institute for Technology, for example, began issuing diplomas via blockchain last year.  The plan by Oxford researchers goes beyond digital diplomas—and beyond many typical proposals to disrupt education in general. It argues for a completely new framework for how college is organized, how professors are paid, and how students connect with learning. In other words, it’s a long shot.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-25-academics-propose-a-blockchain-university-where-faculty-and-algorithms-rule

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Contextualizing coding across subjects enhances entire curriculum

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:16

By Lauren Barack, Education Dive

Peter Nilsson is teaching his students at Massachusetts’ Deerfield Academy how to code through humanities text — which includes rap music, speeches and news stories — by having them use those skills to analyze linguistic details, according to The Hechinger Report.  More states are adding computer science classes and standards to their curriculum, with 40 states and the District of Columbia now allowing students to take computer science classes and count them as part of their math and science high school graduation requirements. To expand access, schools are also looking to weave more computer science skills into other core classes, from music courses where students compose through computer equipment to science classes where they build computer simulations to understand principles.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/contextualizing-coding-across-subjects-enhances-entire-curriculum/540258/

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Professor, Please Meet Your Instructional Designer

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:10

By Doug Lederman
Invisibility of instructional designers is among most surprising — and to designers themselves, upsetting — findings of new Inside Higher Ed Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology. As online enrollments grow and many colleges ramp up their digital course and program offerings, the role of instructional designers — staff members who work with instructors to adapt or build new digital courses — is growing in importance. But new data from Inside Higher Ed’s just-released 2018 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology suggest that instructional designers — and colleges and universities that want them to play a central role helping instructors create high-quality, well-built courses — have a lot of work to do in building awareness of their role.

https://www.insidehighered.com/digital-learning/article/2018/10/31/survey-professors-shows-surprising-lack-awareness-instructional

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Conflicted Views of Technology: A Survey of Faculty Attitudes

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:05

By Doug Lederman, Inside Higher Ed

The proportion of college instructors who are teaching online and blended courses is growing. So is their support for using technology to deliver instruction.  But their belief in the quality and effectiveness of online courses and digital technology isn’t keeping pace.  Those are among the findings — conflicting and confounding, as is often the case — of Inside Higher Ed’s 2018 Survey of Faculty Attitudes on Technology, published today in partnership with Gallup.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/survey/survey-faculty-views-technology-explores-online-teaching-oer-assessment

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Is Open Content Enough? Where OER Advocates Say the Movement Must Go Next

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-11-05 16:03

By Sydney Johnson, EdSurge

Kent McGuire, director of the Education Program at William and Flora Hewlett Foundation:  [Technology] will continue to move and we’ve no choice but to try to keep pace with the affordances that technology brings. But as you move from the technical to the social, cultural and political dimensions of this movement to open things up pedagogically, that stuff feels both harder, more multi-faceted and more important to get at. If we only get at the technical stuff, I worry about whether or not the divides and the variation and the stratification in access and outcomes don’t actually get magnified.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-30-is-open-content-enough-where-oer-advocates-say-the-movement-must-go-next

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WHICH WILL DOMINATE ONLINE TUTORING: AI OR THE GIG ECONOMY?

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-11-04 16:25

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

The market for online tutoring is growing rapidly. In April, Technavio estimated the sector would continue to expand at a CAGR of nearly 7% through 2022. Two forces are driving this growth: the gig economy and AI. While these two currently co-exist in peace, many predict that, across the board, the former is just an intermediary step to the inevitable latter. People who make this argument point usually to the large sums current gig economy platforms are investing in AI, along with the mainstay of capitalism which goes: “everything that can be automated for a competitive advantage, will be automated.”

 

Which Will Dominate Online Tutoring: AI or the Gig Economy?

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CEO steps down at online education unicorn Udacity

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-11-04 16:20

By Cromwell Schubarth, Silicon Valley Business Journal

Vishal Makhijani is stepping down as CEO of online education unicorn Udacity Inc., which last month reportedly cut staff. The move comes after Makhijani earlier this year released numbers for the first time to tout the Mountain View company’s growth as a step toward a possible IPO. “We are supporting our former and current employees through the transition,” the company said in a statement at the time. We continue to hire for key roles.” In its numbers released in February, Udacity said it had doubled its revenue in 2017, pulling in some $70 million — largely from students in the company’s “nanodegree” program. It said it employs about 500 to run its programs around the world. It said it has 10 million students across its paid and free classes, with over 50,000 enrolled in the nanodegree programs.

https://www.bizjournals.com/sanjose/news/2018/10/26/udacity-ceo-vishal-makhijani-ipo.html

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Using Digital Learning to Promote Lifelong Learning

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-11-04 16:15

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

It’s easy to focus on the immense potential that edtech brings to K12 classrooms, but the use of digital learning to promote lifelong learning has received less attention. And yet digital learning is just as powerful of a tool—if not moreso–for adults who want to expand their horizons. Here four ways that lifelong learners can use digital tools:

Using Digital Learning to Promote Lifelong Learning

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Karl Rove and David Axelrod partner for online class on winning elections

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-11-04 16:10

BY JUDY KURTZ, the Hill

An unlikely pair — David Axelrod and Karl Rove — is teaming up, reaching and teaching across the aisle about winning elections. The political odd couple — Axelrod was a senior adviser to former President Obama while Rove famously served under former President George W. Bush — has put on their teaching hats to instruct a MasterClass on politics called “Campaign Strategy and Messaging,” ITK has exclusively learned. The course, which includes 24 separate lessons, will be the first one focused on politics from MasterClass, the online education company, and the first class to be taught by two instructors.

https://thehill.com/blogs/in-the-know/in-the-know/413138-karl-rove-and-david-axelrod-partner-for-online-politics-class

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65 New Online Business Courses You Can Take for Free (or Close to Free)

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-11-04 16:04

By Jessica Stillman, INC

Schools from Harvard to MIT will teach you everything from agile design to supply chain management. The bad news about the modern world is that, thanks to tech, things are changing so fast you’re almost certainly going to have to keep updating your skills throughout your career if you want to be successful. The good news? Thanks to tech, it’s also easier — and cheaper — to do that than ever before. I am talking, obviously, about the incredible wealth of free or close to free online courses out there. You can already learn just about anything, from Renaissance art to programming in Python, via MOOC (for the uninitiated, that’s Massive Open Online Course). But as rich and varied as these online offerings already are, Dhawal Shah, founder of online learning portal Class Central, insists we’re just getting started.

https://www.inc.com/jessica-stillman/60-new-online-business-course-you-can-take-for-free-or-close-to-free.html

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Adaptive learning helps students finish faster

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-11-04 16:02

BY DENNIS PIERCE, eCampus News

Time and cost are two key barriers standing in the way of college completion, and that’s especially true for working adults going back to school. To eliminate these barriers and help registered nurses make faster progress toward earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) degree, the University of Memphis School of Health Studies is using adaptive learning technology and other practices to accelerate completion—reportedly saving participants more than $100,000 in collective tuition costs in a single year. “Students shouldn’t get bogged down with paying to learn things they already know,” says Richard Irwin, dean of UofM Global, the university’s online program. “Adaptive learning helps students move through the content at a more rapid pace.”

Adaptive learning helps students finish faster

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Don’t let your diploma hit its expiration date

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-11-03 17:25

NOLAN TAYLOR, Indianapolis Recorder

It’s not uncommon to see adults rely on the younger generation to fill in the “knowledge gap” for tasks like setting up a new smartphone or posting information on the internet. But consider the many cases where we as adults need to know for ourselves, like being up-to-date enough to help our children with homework (things have changed a bit since we were in school), meeting the demands of a current job or pursuing possibilities of advancement. In some sense, our diplomas and degrees have expiration dates that we can only extend by keeping current.  With so many great options, how do you decide how to keep current or how to update your skills?

http://www.indianapolisrecorder.com/business/article_f3d1b2c0-d86d-11e8-8184-c347d2e5f5ea.html

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Don’t let your diploma hit its expiration date

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-11-03 17:20

NOLAN TAYLOR, Indianapolis Recorder

It’s not uncommon to see adults rely on the younger generation to fill in the “knowledge gap” for tasks like setting up a new smartphone or posting information on the internet. But consider the many cases where we as adults need to know for ourselves, like being up-to-date enough to help our children with homework (things have changed a bit since we were in school), meeting the demands of a current job or pursuing possibilities of advancement. In some sense, our diplomas and degrees have expiration dates that we can only extend by keeping current.  With so many great options, how do you decide how to keep current or how to update your skills?

http://www.indianapolisrecorder.com/business/article_f3d1b2c0-d86d-11e8-8184-c347d2e5f5ea.html

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Fully Online edX Masters Programs

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-11-03 17:15

Sue Gee , iProgrammer
Earlier this month edX announced that starting next fall it would offer fully online Master’s degrees, including ones related to computer science and data science. Some of them build on existing MicroMaster’s programs providing “stackable credentials” along the way. In his blog post making this announcement Anant Agarwal, CEO of edX wrote that the average Master’s graduate increases their salary by $17,000 per year, yet the average Master’s degree costs between $30,000-$120,000. The cost of a Master’s degrees on edX is planned to be between $10,000-$23,000, making it a realistic proposition for many more individuals. “We built these programs for you, our learners, so that you can earn a top ranked graduate degree, at a disruptive price, in a flexible way.

https://www.i-programmer.info/news/150-training-a-education/12242-edx-masters-program.html

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Academics Propose a ‘Blockchain University,’ Where Faculty (and Algorithms) Rule

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-11-03 17:10

By Jeffrey R. Young, EdSurge

Experiments with blockchain in higher education are underway at multiple campuses around the country, and many researchers are looking into how to use the technology to verify and deliver credentials. Massachusetts Institute for Technology, for example, began issuing diplomas via blockchain last year.  The plan by Oxford researchers goes beyond digital diplomas—and beyond many typical proposals to disrupt education in general. It argues for a completely new framework for how college is organized, how professors are paid, and how students connect with learning. In other words, it’s a long shot.

https://www.edsurge.com/news/2018-10-25-academics-propose-a-blockchain-university-where-faculty-and-algorithms-rule

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Contextualizing coding across subjects enhances entire curriculum

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-11-03 17:05

By Lauren Barack, Education Dive

Peter Nilsson is teaching his students at Massachusetts’ Deerfield Academy how to code through humanities text — which includes rap music, speeches and news stories — by having them use those skills to analyze linguistic details, according to The Hechinger Report.  More states are adding computer science classes and standards to their curriculum, with 40 states and the District of Columbia now allowing students to take computer science classes and count them as part of their math and science high school graduation requirements. To expand access, schools are also looking to weave more computer science skills into other core classes, from music courses where students compose through computer equipment to science classes where they build computer simulations to understand principles.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/contextualizing-coding-across-subjects-enhances-entire-curriculum/540258/

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WHICH WILL DOMINATE ONLINE TUTORING: AI OR THE GIG ECONOMY?

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-11-03 17:02

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

The market for online tutoring is growing rapidly. In April, Technavio estimated the sector would continue to expand at a CAGR of nearly 7% through 2022. Two forces are driving this growth: the gig economy and AI. While these two currently co-exist in peace, many predict that, across the board, the former is just an intermediary step to the inevitable latter. People who make this argument point usually to the large sums current gig economy platforms are investing in AI, along with the mainstay of capitalism which goes: “everything that can be automated for a competitive advantage, will be automated.”

Which Will Dominate Online Tutoring: AI or the Gig Economy?

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Struggle for the Future: Schools Lag in Preparing Students for the Age of Automation

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-11-02 17:25

David Cantor, T74

As advances in artificial intelligence and robotics have increasingly substituted for human labor in performing routine tasks and sometimes those that required years of training, the premium on social abilities still beyond the reach of automation — like working well with others and adaptability — has shifted the way schools prepare students for their careers. Over the past decade, educators and policymakers have introduced a myriad of policies and programming to meet new challenges — sometimes directly, as with career and technical education and expanded offerings in STEM and information technology fields, but also in the catchall effort to boost self-directed thinking through higher standards, instruction requiring close student engagement, and better tests.

Struggle for the Future: Schools Lag in Preparing Students for the Age of Automation

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