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Organizations Struggling to Keep Pace with SDN, Networking Trends

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-09-30 17:20

By David Ramel, Campus Technology
Organizations are hard put to keep pace with new developments in the networking industry, according to a new report. “Between multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) and software-defined networking (SDN), there were about 15 years where the networking world was pretty static,” said Avi Freedman, co-founder and CEO of network analytics firm Kentik, which conducted the survey. “Right now we’re in a world moving as fast as the ISP world did back in the 90s. Every few weeks there’s something new.” The firm polled 531 networking pros during the recent Cisco Live 2018 conference to determine current networking trends and how organizations are addressing industry challenges.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/09/12/organizations-hard-put-to-keep-pace-with-sdn.aspx

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Survey: 1 in 4 Professors Ban Mobile Phone Use in Class

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-09-30 17:15

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology
Should cell phones be permitted in class? In a recent survey of faculty members at colleges and universities across the country, feelings on the subject were mixed. While 26 percent of respondents said they do allow students to use mobile phones in the classroom, about the same number — 25 percent — said they do not. Half of respondents allow limited use of the devices.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/09/19/survey-1-in-4-professors-ban-mobile-phone-use-in-class.aspx

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8 Universities Leveraging Community Partnerships to Boost Student Outcomes

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-09-30 17:09

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology
The Association of Public and Land-grant Universities (APLU) and Coalition of Urban Serving Universities (USU) recently announced grants to eight public universities that are forging community partnerships to improve students’ access to and overall success in college. Supported by funding from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Collaborative Opportunity Grants provide each institution with $50,000 to “collaborate, accelerate and improve implementation efforts,” as well as additional support and resources from APLU and USU. Four of the grantees — University of Cincinnati, George Mason University, the University of Texas at San Antonio and Wayne State University — are receiving funding for the first, time, while the other four — California State University, Fresno, Cleveland State University, the University of Memphis and the University of South Alabama — were awarded Collaborative Opportunity Grants in 2017 and are receiving additional funding to expand their projects.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/09/17/8-universities-leveraging-community-partnerships-to-boost-student-outcomes.aspx

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7 ways AI will shape the future of education and work

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-09-30 17:05

BY LAURA ASCIONE, eCampusNews
Artificial intelligence, or AI, is set to have a broad impact on future jobs, and the effects will trickle down to higher ed.  While artificial intelligence (AI) hasn’t yet had a wide-reaching impact on the workforce, AI skills are predicted to remain in increasingly high demand. With so many industries seeing the potential for AI applications come to fruition, the economy will need highly-trained workers to fill what is likely to be a rising demand for such skills.

7 ways AI will shape the future of education and work

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Adobe Analytics unveils Virtual Analyst to find insights in unused data

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-09-30 17:02

by Kimberly Collins, ClickZ

Enterprises today amass a huge amount of data—but end up using only a small sliver of it for actual analysis. Companies use just 1-3% of hundreds of billions of data points per customer to unlock insights. Naturally, the question arises, what’s happening with the other 97-99% of that data? What risks and opportunities are we missing? Adobe Analytics may be able to help us find out. Adobe announced the next generation of “Virtual Analyst” in Adobe Analytics. It’s an AI assistant tool that will analyze vast amounts of data to provide recommendations on what to examine further. They say it’s “designed for the non-quant, to help them perform tasks of a data scientist.”

Adobe Analytics unveils Virtual Analyst to find insights in unused data

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Penn to offer first Ivy League bachelor’s degree online

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-09-29 17:25

by Susan Snyder, the Inquirer

The University of Pennsylvania this summer announced its first online master’s degree. Now it will be offering an online bachelor’s degree, too, and says it’s the first Ivy League university to do so. The new bachelor of applied arts and sciences degree, targeted to working adults and other nontraditional students, will be offered through Penn’s College of Liberal and Professional Studies and will launch in 2019, the university announced Tuesday morning. The Liberal and Professional Studies College for years has offered an alternative path into the highly competitive Ivy League university, often taking students who transfer in from community colleges. Students had access to the same classes on campus and the same faculty as other students.

http://www2.philly.com/philly/education/penn-first-ivy-league-bachelors-degree-online-20180918.html

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U. of Pennsylvania Says It Will Be First Ivy to Offer Online Bachelor’s Degree

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-09-29 17:20

By Beth McMurtrie, Chronicle of Higher Ed
The U. of Pennsylvania’s new bachelor’s-degree program, aimed at nontraditional students, illustrates the growing credibility and popularity of online education. Starting next fall, the University of Pennsylvania will offer what it says is the first online bachelor’s degree at an Ivy League college, an illustration of the growing credibility and popularity of online education. Designed for adult learners, the program will confer a bachelor of applied arts and sciences, and will enroll students through the School of Arts and Sciences’ College of Liberal and Professional Studies, which serves working adults and other nontraditional students.

https://www.chronicle.com/article/U-of-Pennsylvania-Says-It/244558

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FBI Issues Warning on Educational Technology

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-09-29 17:15

By Sara Friedman, THE Journal
Some schools might have a problem on their hands when it comes to the use of educational technology and the need to protect student privacy, according to an alert issued by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The alert warns schools that the widespread collection of student data could have privacy and safety implications if the information is compromised or exploited. Multiple attacks on school information technology systems occurred in 2017 through actors hacking into multiple school district servers, according to the FBI. Student contact information, education plans, homework assignments, medical records and counselor reports were stolen, and then the thieves used that information to contact, extort and threaten students with the release of their personal information.

 

https://thejournal.com/articles/2018/09/18/fbi-issues-warning-on-educational-technology.aspx

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How to use social media to engage Gen Z in class and beyond

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-09-29 17:09

BY SANDRA FYFE, eCampus News

Colleges need to have a savvy social-media presence to attract and hold Generation Z’s attention as well as to address their academic, personal, and career needs. To reach students, colleges must develop effective digital tactics both inside and outside the classroom. And to reach Gen Z where they live, you need to use their favorite platforms—Twitter, Instagram, and Snapchat, says Nicole Kraft, who teaches journalism at Ohio State University, which ranks sixth in BestColleges.com’s Stars of Social Media Colleges 2018. According to Kraft, professors need to teach students how to use platforms properly before giving assignments.

How to use social media to engage Gen Z in class and beyond

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Perspectives on the Future of the Profession: Looking Forward, Then and Now

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-09-29 17:05

by Paige Francis, P.B. Garrett, Cindy Mitchell, Sharon Pitt and Theresa Rowe, EDUCAUSE Review

IT professionals are engaged in more than could even have been imagined two decades ago. Yet the issues discussed then continue to resonate today and offer insight into the future of the profession. Nearly twenty years ago, a panel of technology leaders selected by EDUCAUSE Review answered questions about the future of the higher education IT field.1 Much has changed since. IT professionals are engaged in more than could even have been imagined two decades ago. Yet the issues discussed then continue to resonate today and offer insight into the future of the profession. Below we offer our thoughts on, and answers to, these same questions.

https://er.educause.edu/articles/2018/8/perspectives-on-the-future-of-the-profession-looking-forward-then-and-now

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Massive open online courses have got a second wind

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-09-29 17:02

By Malini Goyal, ET

When I started my college, I had two choices: rant about India’s education system or do something about it. I chose the latter,” says Sanyam Bhutani, 21, a BTech student at SRM College, Chennai.  He chose Udacity — a massive open online course (MOOC) platform that allows users to study courses offered by some prestigious global universities, sitting in their bedrooms — to get ahead of the rest. Bhutani, who is in his final year of college, was soon able to equip himself with adequate skills to float a startup called neuroascent.ml, which pitches for global projects in machine learning and computer vision.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/industry/services/education/massive-open-online-courses-have-got-a-second-wind/articleshow/65914966.cms

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As students return to college, a basic question persists: What are they learning?

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-09-28 17:25

by John Marcus, Hechinger Report

“When you look at college mission statements, they’re loaded with grand pronouncements about the skills and habits of mind they’re going to inspire in their students,” said Alexander McCormick, an associate professor of educational leadership and policy studies at Indiana University Bloomington. Yet “even as they teach their students to back up their claims with evidence, they don’t have much evidence to back up those claims.”  “What students are supposed to be doing or learning diverges wildly,” said Nate Johnson, founder and principal consultant of the firm Postsecondary Analytics, who follows this. “You have students majoring in everything from philosophy to heating and air-conditioning repair to accounting. Even if you had measurable assessments in all those different areas, adding them up to say students made X amount of progress isn’t the same as what you can say about 9-year-olds or 10-year-olds hitting certain benchmarks in reading.”

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Bye-bye to Netflix in Purdue’s largest lecture halls

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-09-28 17:20

By Halona Black, Education Dive
To free up bandwidth for internet traffic related to lectures and other academic needs, Purdue University is restricting access to online streaming websites such as Netflix, Hulu and iTunes during class time in its four largest lecture halls. The university found in a 2016 study that 4% of internet use in its Lilly Hall of Life Sciences was to academic sites while 34% went to sites such as Netflix and Hulu, Inside Higher Ed reported. An additional 64% went to sites with mixed applications, such as Amazon and Google. The lecture halls in which the restrictions are being piloted can hold hundreds of students who often come to class with multiple devices. Since the pilot launched at the start of the fall semester, the wireless system has experienced much less traffic, administrators say, leaving more bandwidth for academic purposes. Faculty members can access the banned sites for teaching purposes.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/bye-bye-to-netflix-in-purdues-largest-lecture-halls/532493/

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Penn to offer Ivy League’s first online bachelor’s degree

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-09-28 17:15

By James Paterson, Education Dive
The University of Pennsylvania will become the first Ivy League college to offer an online bachelor’s degree with the launch of an interdisciplinary program next fall aimed at working adults and other nontraditional learners. Offered through the School of Arts and Sciences’ College of Liberal and Professional Studies (LPS), the applied arts and sciences degree encompasses general education courses and interdisciplinary concentrations as well as two on-campus experiences. The program will take a different approach to instruction than traditional residential courses by using the unique properties of e-learning, officials said. An advisory board of management executives is working with LPS to advise on workforce trends and skills needs.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/penn-to-offer-ivy-leagues-first-online-bachelors-degree/532805/

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The top 5 myths about online learning

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-09-28 17:08

by WXYZ

Sept. 15 marked National Online Learning Day and Dr. Jill Langen of Baker College Online stopped by to debunk a few myths about cyber learning in higher education. Here are the top 5 myths about online learning, according to Baker College Online:

https://www.wxyz.com/news/these-are-the-top-5-myths-about-online-learning

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Organizations Struggling to Keep Pace with SDN, Networking Trends

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-09-28 17:05

By David Ramel, Campus Technology
Organizations are hard put to keep pace with new developments in the networking industry, according to a new report. “Between multiprotocol label switching (MPLS) and software-defined networking (SDN), there were about 15 years where the networking world was pretty static,” said Avi Freedman, co-founder and CEO of network analytics firm Kentik, which conducted the survey. “Right now we’re in a world moving as fast as the ISP world did back in the 90s. Every few weeks there’s something new.” The firm polled 531 networking pros during the recent Cisco Live 2018 conference to determine current networking trends and how organizations are addressing industry challenges.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/09/12/organizations-hard-put-to-keep-pace-with-sdn.aspx

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Bringing Primary Source Materials to Life with AR

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-09-28 17:03

by Meg Loyd, Campus Technology

In several Augmented Archives programs, students use augmented reality (AR) to create museum exhibits of the college’s most precious and historic archival materials — utilizing the technology to encourage high levels of patron interaction with primary source materials that otherwise require restricted physical access. The AR exhibits are created for the public and the many types of users who may be interested in interacting with these materials digitally. Archivists and instructional technologists work with students in different contexts, and at different points in the progress through their academic careers at Washington College, to move the overall initiative forward.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/09/18/bringing-primary-source-materials-to-life-with-ar.aspx

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New learning opportunities for displaced persons

News & Thoughts - Thu, 2018-09-27 17:25

by MIT Open Learning
This week, the MIT Refugee Action Hub (ReACT) announced that it is now accepting applications for the second offering of the Certificate Program in Computer and Data Science. The one-year course of study is designed for refugees and other displaced people around the world, and offers them the opportunity to earn a certificate in a rigorous, yet accessible program that allows young adults to reactivate their potential and restart careers. The inaugural group of students will be completing their studies in January 2019. The blended program will continue to offer a core online curriculum of the edX catalogue along with an immersive set of in-person workshops and classes offered by MIT faculty and staff. These offerings include an entrepreneurship program, led by the MIT Bootcamps and a MakerLab run by the Little Devices Lab. Admir Masic, faculty lead and the Esther and Harold E. Edgerton Career Development Professor in the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, founded ReACT in 2017 with a mission to provide blended learning opportunities to refugees around the world.

http://news.mit.edu/2018/mit-react-expands-learning-opportunities-refugees-displaced-populations-0921

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Professors find ways to prevent cheating for online classes

News & Thoughts - Thu, 2018-09-27 17:23

By: Natassia Henry, Daily Toreador

Many students may think professors are not aware of the various cheating tactics students try, but Lisa Low, assistant professor of practice in public relations at Texas Tech, said that could not be further from the truth. “Very few (professors) are not, not aware of the many ways to collude,” Low said. Professors are understanding when it comes to the lifestyles of students. Low said if students are in a jam, it is better for them to talk to their professor rather than cheat, because once a student cheats, the professors are obligated to report it. Once that is done, it is no longer in the hands of the professor.

http://www.dailytoreador.com/news/professors-find-ways-to-prevent-cheating-for-online-classes/article_74838ffa-bdc1-11e8-81c8-d72d20ca3dc0.html

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THE LATEST COURSE CATALOG TREND? BLOCKCHAIN 101

News & Thoughts - Thu, 2018-09-27 17:15

by Wired
On a clear, warm night earlier this year, several dozen students at the University of California, Berkeley, folded themselves into gray chairs for a three-hour class on how to think like blockchain entrepreneurs. The evening’s challenge, presented by Berkeley city councilmember Ben Bartlett, was to brainstorm how blockchain technology might be used to alleviate the city’s growing homeless problem. New York University, Georgetown, and Stanford are among the other institutions that offer blockchain technology courses to get students thinking about its potential uses and to better prepare them for the workforce. Job postings requiring blockchain skills ballooned by 200 percent in the first five months of this year, compared with the same period a year earlier, though they remain less than 1 percent of software development jobs, according to the research firm Burning Glass Technologies. Universities like MIT, Cornell, and Columbia are launching labs and research centers to explore the technology and its policy implications and seed the development of rigorous curricula on the topic.

https://www.wired.com/story/latest-course-catalog-trend-blockchain-101/

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