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Best Practices for Gamification in Schools

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-03-26 17:15

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

In education, “gamification” refers to using elements of game play (such as rules, competition, and point scoring) as a teaching tool that increases student engagement and motivation. Gamification can include badges, leaderboards, and any type of educational competition or game. While the concept of gamification isn’t new, the digital tools available to today’s teachers make gamification more innovative and engaging than ever before. Research indicates that gamification helps students develop more positive attitudes toward learning, increases cognitive and social growth, improves attention spans, and more. To ensure your students benefit as much as possible from gamification, try following these best practices for gamification in schools.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/best-practices-for-gamification-in-schools/

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Personalized learning is for online courses, too

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-03-26 17:08

By Autumn A. Arnett, Education Dive
eCornell CEO Paul Krause said his organization, which started as an entrepreneurial unit of Cornell University’s main campus and now provides much of the institution’s online infrastructure and marketing, has laid out a model for massive open online course (MOOCs) providers to look to as an example for monetization.  Personalization is important, said Krause during a conversation in Austin last week. Even in an online or blended space, he said, offering relevant, engaging experiences is the best way to get the desired outcomes for the average students. To achieve the needed level of personalization, Krause said instructors and course designers should find ways to embed high levels of peer-to-peer interaction, even within online modules, and incorporate course examples that are timely and relevant to students.

https://www.educationdive.com/news/personalized-learning-is-for-online-courses-too/

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Why College Professors Still Struggle with EdTech

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-03-26 17:05

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Some striking recent statistics indicate that while 92% of educators say that they would like to use more edtech in their classroom in the future (because they believe it enhances student engagement and learning outcomes) and yet only 14% of them actually use digital learning materials on a week by week basis. College professors account for a large proportion of the educators who, though they appreciate the value of edtech, do not actually use it to teach. So why is there such apathy or resistance toward edtech in the higher education classroom?

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/college-professors-still-struggle-edtech/

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UPCEA Intros Digital Badges for Excellence in Online Learning

News & Thoughts - Mon, 2018-03-26 17:03

By Rhea Kelly, Campus Technology

The University Professional and Continuing Education Association (UPCEA) has launched a program to recognize excellence in online higher education: the Hallmarks of Excellence in Online Leadership Review. The program evaluates online education programs based on seven key elements, such as internal advocacy, entrepreneurial initiative and faculty support, and then issues Credly digital badges to qualifying colleges and universities.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/03/15/upcea-intros-digital-badges-for-excellence-in-online-learning.aspx

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5 Ways to Use Digital Badges in the Classroom

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-03-25 17:25

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Similarly, digital badges award students for their achievements, skills, or other positive qualities. It might seem like a digital image of a badge won’t make much difference. But believe it or not, digital badges have the power to transform the way your students view learning and assessment.  How?  Here are five ways to use digital badges in your classroom:

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/5-ways-to-use-digital-badges-in-the-classroom/

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In the Future, Artificial Intelligence and Education Will Go Hand-in-Hand

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-03-25 17:20

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Artificial intelligence is becoming a part of our daily reality, so we should anticipate it making changes in the realm of education. We are already becoming invested in our personal AI assistants, such as Siri and Alexa, and we are eagerly awaiting self-driving vehicles. What was once only considered a future possibility is here – and it is here to stay. According to research, the compound annual growth rate of artificial intelligence in education is expected to be “47.50% during the period 2017-2021.” That’s a huge leap! As our lives become more intertwined with technology and AI, it will also follow students into the classroom. And, it just may be what the US Education system needs.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/in-the-future-artificial-intelligence-and-education-will-go-hand-in-hand/

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Two UMD courses will have free online textbook access in the fall

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-03-25 17:15

by Christine Condon, DBK News

Two University of Maryland biology courses will be among many in the University System of Maryland to offer students free online textbook access next year with the help of a system grant program. BSCI201 and 202, introductory courses in human anatomy and physiology, will use a free, open-source textbook from OpenStax beginning in the fall, said biology professor Sara Lombardi. To make the switch, university lecturers for the courses received a $1,500 grant from the Maryland Open Source Textbook initiative, which offers grants to encourage faculty to utilize open educational resources. The grants were announced March 6.

http://www.dbknews.com/2018/03/14/umd-textbooks-free-open-source/

 

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Coursera Announces First Online Bachelor’s Degree

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-03-25 17:10

By Cait Etherington, eLearning Inside

As described on the Cousera website, their new online Bachelor of Science in Computer Science degree will be offered by the University of London. Students will “learn in-demand computing skills,” develop their “abilities to solve complex problems,” and nurture both their innovation and creativity. They will also develop “real-world computer science skills” by developing their own software projects. Subject areas owill include Machine Learning, Data Science, Artificial Intelligence, Web Development, Virtual Reality, and Game Development. The degree is expected to launch in April 2019, pending approval by the University of London.

Coursera Announces First Online Bachelor’s Degree

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Udacity U-Turns on Money-Back Guarantee

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-03-25 17:06

by Lindsay McKenzie, Inside Higher Ed

Udacity has quietly scrapped its pledge, nixing the program, which guaranteed a job within six months of graduation or 100 percent of students’ money back, at the end of last year. Announced with much fanfare, the job guarantee applied to Udacity’s Nanodegree Plus program, an enhanced version of the nanodegree with access to a career adviser and career concierge services. Udacity stopped accepting new enrollments into the Nanodegree Plus program in December 2017, and the program will come to a complete end in June. The program was priced at $299 a month ($100 more than a regular nanodegree) and was available in four areas — Android developer, iOS developer, machine learning engineer and senior web developer. Udacity says on its website that most nanodegrees take students between six months and a year to complete.

https://www.insidehighered.com/news/2018/03/16/udacity-ends-pledge-students-get-hired-or-get-their-money-back

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In the Future, Artificial Intelligence and Education Will Go Hand-in-Hand

News & Thoughts - Sun, 2018-03-25 17:03

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

Artificial intelligence is becoming a part of our daily reality, so we should anticipate it making changes in the realm of education. We are already becoming invested in our personal AI assistants, such as Siri and Alexa, and we are eagerly awaiting self-driving vehicles. What was once only considered a future possibility is here – and it is here to stay. According to research, the compound annual growth rate of artificial intelligence in education is expected to be “47.50% during the period 2017-2021.” That’s a huge leap! As our lives become more intertwined with technology and AI, it will also follow students into the classroom. And, it just may be what the US Education system needs.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/in-the-future-artificial-intelligence-and-education-will-go-hand-in-hand/

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Educators Tend to Forget That Most Online Students Still Live Near Campus

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-03-24 17:25

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

The majority of online students live within 100 miles of the university in which they are enrolled. According to a report updated in 2017 by College Atlas, the figure stands at 80%. Only 1 in 5 online students live far away from their campus. What’s more, the proportion of online students who live near their university has only grown in recent years. A 2016 survey of online college students by Learning House and Aslanian Market Research found that, among undergraduates, 57% lived less than 50 miles away, while 17% were between 50-100 miles out. Four years earlier, in 2012, those figures stood at 47% and 16%, respectively. The growth was even greater for graduate students.

Educators Tend to Forget That Most Online Students Still Live Near Campus

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MERLOT Updated for Mobile OER Hunting

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-03-24 17:20

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

MERLOT, the granddaddy of open educational resources developed by the California State University system, has entered its third decade of operation with a new facelift. The project, as always, provides a gateway to OER. But with its newest release, search functionality has been expanded and coding has been done using responsive web design to make it mobile device-friendly.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/03/15/merlot-updated-for-mobile-oer-hunting.aspx

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Why You Should Teach Online Courses

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-03-24 17:15

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

This week, an English professor at Loyola University New Orleans penned an article for Inside Higher Ed titled “Why I Won’t Teach Online.” Professor Christopher Schaberg acknowledged that he used the internet for many things, and that there were several benefits of online courses.   At Loyola College New Orleans, tuition alone is nearly $40,000 per year. In many other institutions it’s even higher.  It’s a cliché to say that many professors are out of touch with current technology that could aid them in the lecture hall. But as Professor Schaberg demonstrates, his colleagues are actually more out of touch with the socioeconomic realities of college-going learners in the U.S. He is by no means alone. A study released by Inside Higher Ed and Gallup in the fall of 2017 found that one third of university professors oppose teaching their courses online, while another third remain ambivalent on the subject.

Why You Should Teach Online Courses

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Educators Tend to Forget That Most Online Students Still Live Near Campus

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-03-24 17:10

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

The majority of online students live within 100 miles of the university in which they are enrolled. According to a report updated in 2017 by College Atlas, the figure stands at 80%. Only 1 in 5 online students live far away from their campus. What’s more, the proportion of online students who live near their university has only grown in recent years. A 2016 survey of online college students by Learning House and Aslanian Market Research found that, among undergraduates, 57% lived less than 50 miles away, while 17% were between 50-100 miles out. Four years earlier, in 2012, those figures stood at 47% and 16%, respectively. The growth was even greater for graduate students.

Educators Tend to Forget That Most Online Students Still Live Near Campus

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MERLOT Updated for Mobile OER Hunting

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-03-24 17:06

By Dian Schaffhauser, Campus Technology

MERLOT, the granddaddy of open educational resources developed by the California State University system, has entered its third decade of operation with a new facelift. The project, as always, provides a gateway to OER. But with its newest release, search functionality has been expanded and coding has been done using responsive web design to make it mobile device-friendly.

https://campustechnology.com/articles/2018/03/15/merlot-updated-for-mobile-oer-hunting.aspx

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Why You Should Teach Online Courses

News & Thoughts - Sat, 2018-03-24 17:03

By Henry Kronk, eLearning Inside

This week, an English professor at Loyola University New Orleans penned an article for Inside Higher Ed titled “Why I Won’t Teach Online.” Professor Christopher Schaberg acknowledged that he used the internet for many things, and that there were several benefits of online courses.   At Loyola College New Orleans, tuition alone is nearly $40,000 per year. In many other institutions it’s even higher.  It’s a cliché to say that many professors are out of touch with current technology that could aid them in the lecture hall. But as Professor Schaberg demonstrates, his colleagues are actually more out of touch with the socioeconomic realities of college-going learners in the U.S. He is by no means alone. A study released by Inside Higher Ed and Gallup in the fall of 2017 found that one third of university professors oppose teaching their courses online, while another third remain ambivalent on the subject.

Why You Should Teach Online Courses

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Education needs innovation to keep it fresh. Can social learning environments provide the boost?

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-03-23 17:27

by Kulmeet Bawa, ET Rise

Much of today’s established working population comes from an era that offered only static learning using limited resources. Most of us had to be self-motivated and acquire skills on the job to emerge as high-performers. The modern generation of learners, on the other hand, use technology to shape their careers in a more deliberate and thoughtful manner by signing up on websites and apps such as Coursera, edX, Byju et al. Learning has become an immersive experience for them.

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/small-biz/startups/newsbuzz/education-needs-innovation-to-keep-it-fresh-can-social-learning-environments-provide-the-boost/articleshow/63242961.cms

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Universities Deploy Chatbots to Aid Students in the Admissions Process and Beyond

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-03-23 17:20

by Meghan Bogardus Cortez, EdTech

Chatbots assist people daily with everything from ordering pizza to dealing with customer service issues. So, it’s no surprise that higher education institutions are embracing them to interact with their No. 1 customer: students. Whether it’s navigating the admissions process or scheduling classes, universities have embraced artificial intelligence to streamline student interactions and offer timely support.

https://edtechmagazine.com/higher/article/2018/03/universities-deploy-chatbots-aid-students-admissions-process-and-beyond

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10 Resources for finding edtech jobs

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-03-23 17:15

by Matthew Lynch, Tech Edvocate

If you’re on the hunt for a new job in education technology, or just simply curious about the opportunities that might be out there, you should explore some new roles. Whether you’re looking for a job, looking to hire, or just looking, consider checking out the following resources in education technology career building.

http://www.thetechedvocate.org/10-resources-for-finding-edtech-jobs/

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Grading with AI: How Kadenze Powers Its Online Fine Arts Courses

News & Thoughts - Fri, 2018-03-23 17:05

By Henry Kronk March, eLearning Inside

MOOCs, online courses, and other eLeraning initiatives have increased access to education for learners around the world. But there’s a kind of unspoken belief generally held in regard to online education: it works well with some subjects, but less so with others. STEM subjects, which typically require mastery of specific, discrete subject matter, are very popular online. But when it comes to more subjective matters, like social and emotional intelligence, the arts, or the fine arts, many find the online setting to pale in comparison to its in-person equivalent. But one company is changing that narrative. To fine art purists, Kadenze does the unthinkable. Not only does it offer art courses that span “Designing Synthesizer Sounds” to “Custom Handlettering”; it grades student work with artificial intelligence (AI).

Grading with AI: How Kadenze Powers Its Online Fine Arts Courses

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